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Self-propelled Artillery
Self-propelled artillery
Self-propelled artillery
(also called mobile artillery or locomotive artillery) is artillery equipped with its own propulsion system to move towards its target. Within the term are covered self-propelled guns (or howitzers) and rocket artillery. They are high mobility vehicles, usually based on continuous tracks carrying either a large howitzer, field gun, a mortar or some form of rocket or missile launcher. They are usually used for long-range indirect bombardment support on the battlefield. In the past, self-propelled artillery has included direct-fire vehicles, such as assault guns and tank destroyers. These have been heavily armoured vehicles, the former providing close fire-support for infantry and the latter acting as specialized anti-tank vehicles. Modern self-propelled artillery vehicles may superficially resemble tanks, but they are generally lightly armoured, too lightly to survive in direct-fire combat
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Bombardment
A bombardment is an attack by artillery fire or by dropping bombs from aircraft on fortifications, combatants, or towns and buildings. Prior to World War
War
I, the term was only applied to the bombardment of defenseless or undefended objects, houses, public buildings, etc
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Continuous Track
Continuous track, also called tank tread[1] or caterpillar track, is a system of vehicle propulsion in which a continuous band of treads or track plates is driven by two or more wheels. This band is typically made of modular steel plates in the case of military vehicles and heavy equipment, or synthetic rubber reinforced with steel wires in the case of lighter agricultural or construction vehicles. The large surface area of the tracks distributes the weight of the vehicle better than steel or rubber tires on an equivalent vehicle, enabling a continuous tracked vehicle to traverse soft ground with less likelihood of becoming stuck due to sinking. The prominent treads of the metal plates are both hard-wearing and damage resistant, especially in comparison to rubber tires
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Tanks In The Israeli Army
Israeli
Israeli
may refer to:Israelis, citizens or permanent residents of the State of Israel Modern Hebrew, a language Israeli
Israeli
(newspaper), published from 2006 to 2008 Somethin
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Tankette
A tankette is a tracked armoured fighting vehicle[1] that resembles a small tank, roughly the size of a car. It is mainly intended for light infantry support and scouting.[2][3] Colloquially it may also simply mean a small tank.[4] Several countries built tankettes between the 1920s and 1940s, and some saw limited combat in the early phases of World War II. The vulnerability of their light armor, however, eventually led armies to abandon the concept with some exceptions such as the German Wiesel (Weasel) series.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History 3 Examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] Tankettes were made both in two- and three-man models. Some were so low that the occupant had to lie prone.[3] Some models were not equipped with turrets (and together with the tracked mobility, this is often seen as defining the concept), or just a very simple one that was traversed by hand or leg
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Multiple Rocket Launcher
A multiple rocket launcher (MRL) or multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) is a type of rocket artillery system. Rockets have different capabilities than artillery, like longer range, and different payloads, typically considerably larger warheads than a similarly sized artillery platform, or multiple warheads. Unguided rocket artillery is notoriously inaccurate and slow to reload, compared to artillery. To overcome this, rockets are combined in systems that can launch multiple rockets simultaneously. Modern rockets can use GPS or inertial guidance, to combine the advantages of rockets with high accuracy.Contents1 History1.1 World War II2 Types 3 Current usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first multiple rocket launchers, huo che, were made during the medieval Chinese Song dynasty. It was designed to launch multiple rocket arrows from a gunpowder box
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Basra
Basra
Basra
(Arabic: البصرة‎ al-Baṣrah), is an Iraqi city located on the Shatt al-Arab
Shatt al-Arab
between Kuwait
Kuwait
and Iran. It had an estimated population of 2.5 million in 2012.[2] Basra
Basra
is also Iraq's main port, although it does not have deep water access, which is handled at the port of Umm Qasr. The city is part of the historic location of Sumer, one of the ports from which Sinbad the Sailor
Sinbad the Sailor
journeyed.[citation needed] It played an important role in early Islamic history
Islamic history
and was built in 636 (14 AH). Basra
Basra
is consistently one of the hottest cities in Iraq, with summer temperatures regularly exceeding 50 °C (122 °F)
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Mortar (weapon)
A mortar is an indirect fire device that launches projectiles at ranges from 70 meters to 14,000 meters. The mortar has traditionally been used as a weapon to propel explosive shells called mortar rounds in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. The weapon is typically muzzle-loading with a short, often smooth-bore barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. Modern mortars are light and easily portable. They can be used for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Modern portable mortar 1.3 Largest mortars 1.4 Improvised mortars2 Function 3 Design3.1 Distinctive features of mortars 3.2 Spigot mortar 3.3 Gun-mortars4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have been used for hundreds of years, originally in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror
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German Army
General
General
Ulrich de Maizière General
General
Ernst Ferber, COMAFCENT 1973–1975 Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
Jörg Schönbohm, later Undersecretary of DefenseThe German Army
Army
(German: Deutsches Heer) is the land component of the armed forces of Germany. The present-day German Army
Army
was founded in 1955 as part of the newly formed West German Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
together with the Marine (German Navy) and the Luftwaffe (German Air Force)
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Indirect-fire
Indirect fire
Indirect fire
is aiming and firing a projectile without relying on a direct line of sight between the gun and its target, as in the case of direct fire. Aiming is performed by calculating azimuth and elevation angles, and may include correcting aim by observing the fall of shot and calculating new angles.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Related issues 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] There are two dimensions in aiming a weapon:In the horizontal plane (azimuth); and In the vertical plane (elevation), which is governed by the distance (range) to the target and the energy of the propelling charge.The projectile trajectory is affected by atmospheric conditions, the velocity of the projectile, the difference in altitude between the firer and the target, and other factors. Direct fire
Direct fire
sights may include mechanisms to compensate for some of these
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Rocket
A rocket (from Italian rocchetto "bobbin")[nb 1][1] is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine. Rocket engine
Rocket engine
exhaust is formed entirely from propellant carried within the rocket before use.[2] Rocket
Rocket
engines work by action and reaction and push rockets forward simply by expelling their exhaust in the opposite direction at high speed, and can therefore work in the vacuum of space. In fact, rockets work more efficiently in space than in an atmosphere. Multistage rockets are capable of attaining escape velocity from Earth and therefore can achieve unlimited maximum altitude. Compared with airbreathing engines, rockets are lightweight and powerful and capable of generating large accelerations
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Assault Gun
An assault gun is a form of self-propelled artillery[1] which utilizes an infantry support gun mounted on a motorized chassis, normally an armored fighting vehicle.[2] Assault guns are designed to provide direct fire support for infantry attacks, especially against other infantry or fortified positions.[3] The term is a literal translation of the German word Sturmgeschütz, which was applied to the first purpose-built assault gun, the StuG III, in 1940.[3] Historically, the concept of assault guns was very similar to that of the infantry tank, as both were combat vehicles intended to accompany infantry formations into battle.[4] However, during World War II assault guns were more mobile than tanks and could be utilized as both direct and indirect fire artillery.[4] Although they could approximate the firepower of a tank, assault guns mostly fired high explosive shells at relatively low velocities, which were well suited for their role of knocking out hard points such as fortified posit
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Howitzer
A howitzer /ˈhaʊ.ɪtsər/ is a type of artillery piece characterized by a relatively short barrel and the use of comparatively small propellant charges to propel projectiles over relatively high trajectories, with a steep angle of descent.Pre- World War I
World War I
290 mm howitzer battery at Charlottenlund
Charlottenlund
Fort, Denmark.In the taxonomies of artillery pieces used by European (and European-style) armies in the 17th to 20th centuries, the howitzer stood between the "gun" (characterized by a longer barrel, larger propelling charges, smaller shells, higher velocities, and flatter trajectories) and the "mortar" (which was meant to fire at even higher angles of ascent and descent)
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Tanks Of North Korea
The history and development of the tank in North Korea
North Korea
spans the period from their adoption after World War II
World War II
with the foundation of the Korean People's Army, into the Cold War
Cold War
and the present
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Self-propelled Anti-aircraft Weapon
An anti-aircraft vehicle, also known as a self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) or self-propelled air defense system (SPAD), is a mobile vehicle with a dedicated anti-aircraft capability. The Russian equivalent of SPAAG is ZSU, for zenitnaya samokhodnaya ustanovka, ("anti-aircraft self-propelled mount"). Specific weapon systems used include machine guns, autocannons, larger guns, or missiles, and some mount both guns and longer-ranged missiles (e.g. the Pantsir-S1). Platforms used include both trucks and heavier combat vehicles such as APCs and tanks, which add protection from aircraft, artillery, and small arms fire for front line deployment. Anti-aircraft guns are usually mounted in a quickly-traversing turret with a high rate of elevation, for tracking fast-moving aircraft. They are often in dual or quadruple mounts, allowing a high rate of fire. In addition, most anti-aircraft guns can be used in a direct-fire role against surface targets to great effect
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Tank Destroyer
A tank destroyer or tank hunter is a type of armoured fighting vehicle, armed with a direct-fire artillery gun or missile launcher, with limited operational capacities and designed specifically to engage enemy tanks. Tanks are armoured fighting vehicles designed for front-line combat, combining operational mobility and tactical offensive and defensive capabilities; tanks perform all primary tasks of the armoured troops. The tank destroyer on the other hand is specifically designed to take on enemy tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles.[1] Many are based on a tracked tank chassis, while others are wheeled. Since World War II, gun-armed tank destroyers have fallen out of favor as armies have favored multirole main battle tanks. However, lightly armored anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) carriers are commonly used for supplementary long-range anti-tank work
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