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Sefer Yetzirah
Sefer Yetzirah
Sefer Yetzirah
(Hebrew: ספר יצירה‬ Sēpher Yəṣîrâh, Book of Formation, or Book of Creation) is the title of the earliest extant book on Jewish esotericism, although some early commentators treated it as a treatise on mathematical and linguistic theory as opposed to Kabbalah. Yetzirah is more literally translated as "Formation"; the word Briah is used for "Creation".[1] The book is traditionally ascribed to the patriarch Abraham, although others attribute its writing to Rabbi
Rabbi
Akiva. Modern scholars haven't reached consensus on the question of its origins
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Abraham Isaac Kook
Abraham Isaac Kook
Abraham Isaac Kook
(Hebrew: אברהם יצחק הכהן קוק‬ Abraham Yitshak ha- Kohen
Kohen
Kuk; 8 September 1865 – 11 September 1935) was an Orthodox rabbi, the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of British Mandatory Palestine, the founder of Yeshiva
Yeshiva
Mercaz HaRav Kook
Mercaz HaRav Kook
(The Central Universal Yeshiva), a Jewish thinker, Halakhist, Kabbalist, and a renowned Torah
Torah
scholar. He is known in Hebrew as הרב אברהם יצחק הכהן קוק‬ HaRav Avraham Yitzchak HaCohen Kook, and by the acronym הראיה‬ (HaRaAYaH), or simply as "HaRav"
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Temurah (Kabbalah)
Temurah is one of the three ancient methods used by Kabbalists
Kabbalists
to rearrange words and sentences in the Bible, in the belief that by this method they can derive the esoteric substratum and deeper spiritual meaning of the words. (The others are Gematria and Notarikon.) Temurah may be used to change letters in certain words to create a new meaning for a Biblical statement. The Hebrew alphabet
Hebrew alphabet
is an Abjad
Abjad
or consonantary alphabet
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Tannaim
Tannaim (Hebrew: תנאים‬ [tanaˈʔim], singular Hebrew: תנא‬ [taˈna], Tanna "repeaters", "teachers"[1]) were the Rabbinic sages whose views are recorded in the Mishnah, from approximately 10-220 CE. The period of the Tannaim, also referred to as the Mishnaic period, lasted about 210 years. It came after the period of the Zugot ("pairs"), and was immediately followed by the period of the Amoraim
Amoraim
("interpreters").[2] The root tanna (אתנא‬) is the Talmudic Aramaic equivalent for the Hebrew root shanah (שנה‬), which also is the root-word of Mishnah. The verb shanah (שנה‬) literally means "to repeat [what one was taught]" and is used to mean "to learn". The Mishnaic period is commonly divided up into five periods according to generations. There are approximately 120 known Tannaim. The Tannaim lived in several areas of the Land of Israel
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Shemhamphorasch
The Shem HaMephorash (Hebrew: שם המפורש, alternatively Shem ha-Mephorash or Schemhamphoras), meaning the explicit name, is an originally Tannaitic term[1] describing a hidden name of God
God
in Kabbalah
Kabbalah
(including Christian and Hermetic variants), and in some more mainstream Jewish discourses
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Toledano Tradition
Z'ev ben Shimon Halevi (English name, Warren Kenton) is an author of books on the Toledano Tradition of Kabbalah, a teacher of the discipline, with a worldwide following, and a founder member of the Kabbalah
Kabbalah
Society.Contents1 Early life 2 Kabbalistic work 3 Influence 4 Bibliography 5 Criticism 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Z'ev ben Shimon Halevi was born, on 8 January 1933, into a Jewish family in London, England, where he continues to live and work, along with his wife, Rebekah. [1] On his father's side of the family, he descends from a rabbinical Sephardi
Sephardi
line with roots in Bessarabia which was, at the turn of the 20th century, a province of Russia. On his mother's side, he is descended from a Polish Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
family
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Tohu And Tikun
Tikkun/Tikun (תיקון‬) is a Hebrew word meaning "Fixing/Rectification". It has several connotations in Judaism: Traditional: Tikkun (book), a book of Torah scroll text, used when learning to chant Torah portions or for correct-fixed scribal calligraphy Tohu and Tikkun: The two stages of Existence described in the Kabbalah of Isaac Luria
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Panentheism
Panentheism (meaning "all-in-God", from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
πᾶν pân, "all", ἐν en, "in" and Θεός Theós, "God")[1] is the belief that the divine pervades and interpenetrates every part of the universe and also extends beyond time and space
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Safed
Safed
Safed
(Hebrew: צְפַת‬ Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas, Biblical: Ṣ'fath; Arabic: صفد‎, Ṣafad) is a city in the Northern District of Israel
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Shekhinah
The Shekhina(h) (also spelled Shekina(h), Schechina(h), or Shechina(h)) (Biblical Hebrew: שכינה‎) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning "dwelling" or "settling" and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God
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Jewish Angelic Hierarchy
In Judaism, angels (Hebrew: מַלְאָךְ‎ mal’akh, plural: מלאכים mal’akhim) are supernatural beings that appear throughout the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew Bible), Rabbinic literature, apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, and traditional Jewish liturgy
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Old Yishuv
The Old Yishuv
Yishuv
(Hebrew: היישוב הישן‎, ha- Yishuv
Yishuv
ha-Yashan) were the Jewish communities of the southern Syrian provinces in the Ottoman period,[1] up to the onset of Zionist aliyah and the consolidation of the New Yishuv
Yishuv
by the end of World War I
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Sephardic Judaism
Sephardic law and customs
Sephardic law and customs
means the practice of Judaism
Judaism
as observed by the Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews, so far as it is peculiar to themselves and not shared with other Jewish groups such as the Ashkenazim. Sephardim do not constitute a separate denomination within Judaism, but rather a distinct cultural, juridical and philosophical tradition. Sephardim are, primarily, the descendants of Jews
Jews
from the Iberian peninsula
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Beit El Synagogue
The Beit El Synagogue
Beit El Synagogue
("House of God" synagogue), (also known as Midrash Hasidim [School of the Devout] and Yeshivat haMekubalim [ Yeshiva
Yeshiva
of the Kabbalists]) has been (and remains to this day) the center of kabbalistic study in
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Shtetl
Shtetlekh (Yiddish: שטעטל‎, shtetl (singular), שטעטלעך, shtetlekh (plural))[1] were small towns with large Jewish populations, which existed in Central and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
before the Holocaust. Shtetlekh were mainly found in the areas that constituted the 19th century Pale of Settlement
Pale of Settlement
in the Russian Empire, the Congress Kingdom of Poland, Galicia (Ukraine) and Romania
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Tzadikim Nistarim
The Tzadikim Nistarim (Hebrew: צַדִיקִים נִסתָּרים‬, "hidden righteous ones") or Lamed Vav Tzadikim (Hebrew: ל"ו צַדִיקִים‬,x"36 righteous ones"), often abbreviated to Lamed Vav(niks),[a] refers to 36 righteous people, a notion rooted within the more mystical dimensions of Judaism. The singular form is Tzadik
Tzadik
Nistar (Hebrew: צַדִיק נִסתָר‬).Contents1 Origins 2 Their purpose 3 Lamedvavniks 4 Notes 5 In popular culture 6 References 7 External linksOrigins[edit] The source is the Talmud
Talmud
itself, explained as follows:As a mystical concept, the number 36 is even more intriguing. It is said that at all times there are 36 special people in the world, and that were it not for them, all of them, if even one of them was missing, the world would come to an end. The two Hebrew letters for 36 are the lamed, which is 30, and the vav, which is 6
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