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Screw Your Neighbour
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
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Dedicated Deck Card Game
Dedicated deck card games are card games with decks that are specific to that game, rather than using standard playing cards. By the early nineteenth century, educational games were being created, such as "The Historical Game of Grecian History", created by John Wallis. Today's collectible card games are played with dedicated decks. See also[edit] List of dedicated deck card gamesThis card game-related article is a stub
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Gnav
Gnav
Gnav
is a traditional game that is played with either cards or wooden pieces. Related games are Cuccù, Hexenspiel, Gnaio, Vogelspiel, Cambio (also Campio, Camphio, Camfio, or Kamfio), and Kille. The game can be played by 20 or more players, and a minimum of two.[1]Contents1 History of the game 2 Rules 3 Sets3.1 Gnav 3.2 Slabberjan 3.3 Kille 3.4 Cuccù 3.5 Hexenspiel4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory of the game[edit]Swedish Kille deck from 1897.The earliest reference to the game dates to 1490 France where it was known by the name of Mécontent (Malcontent) and was played with a standard 52-card deck.[2] Such a game is still played today in France as Coucou ("cuckoo") and also in English speaking countries as Cuckoo or Ranter-Go-Round
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Playing Cards
A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China
China
during the Tang dynasty.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Persia and Arabia 1.3 Egypt 1.4 Spread across Europe and early design changes 1.5 Later design changes2 Modern deck formats2.1 French suits3 Symbols in Unicode 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 Cited sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit]A Chinese printed playing card dated c
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Playing Card
A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China
China
during the Tang dynasty.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Persia and Arabia 1.3 Egypt 1.4 Spread across Europe and early design changes 1.5 Later design changes2 Modern deck formats2.1 French suits3 Symbols in Unicode 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 Cited sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit]A Chinese printed playing card dated c
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Edmond Hoyle
Edmond Hoyle
Edmond Hoyle
(1672 – 29 August 1769)[1] was a writer best known for his works on the rules and play of card games. The phrase "according to Hoyle" came into the language as a reflection of his generally perceived authority on the subject;[1] since that time, use of the phrase has expanded into general use in situations in which a speaker wishes to indicate an appeal to a putative authority.Contents1 Early life undocumented 2 Treatise on whist2.1 Superseded by new rules3 Other published works3.1 Collected edition 3.2 Reprints4 Modern usage 5 References 6 BibliographyEarly life undocumented[edit] Little is known about Hoyle's life; he is primarily known through his books
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R. F. Foster (games)
Robert Frederick Foster
Robert Frederick Foster
(May 31, 1853 – December 25, 1945)[1][2][3] of New York City, known as R. F. Foster, was a memory training promoter and the prolific writer of more than 50 nonfiction books.[4] He wrote primarily on the rules of play and methods for successful play of card, dice, and board games. Alan Truscott
Alan Truscott
wrote 20 years after his death that Foster "had been one of the great figures in whist and bridge" for 60 years.[5]Contents1 Biography 2 Memory trainer 3 Bibliography 4 Contributions to whist and bridge 5 Notelist 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] R. F. Foster was born in Edinburgh, Scotland
Edinburgh, Scotland
on May 31, 1853, the son of Alexander Frederick and Mary E
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Ranter-Go-Round
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
[...More...]

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Card Game
A card game is any game using playing cards as the primary device with which the game is played, be they traditional or game-specific. Countless card games exist, including families of related games (such as poker). A small number of card games played with traditional decks have formally standardized rules, but most are folk games whose rules vary by region, culture, and person. Many games that are not generally placed in the family of card games do in fact use cards for some aspect of their gameplay. Similarly, some games that are placed in the card game genre involve a board
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Pagat.com
Pagat.com is a website containing rules to hundreds of card games from all over the world. Maintained by John McLeod, it contains information for traditional, commercial, and newly invented card games from all over the world. The site cannot provide official rules to "folk games" as none generally exist, but rather reports how the games are actually played. As a consequence, the game articles provide many variants for the described games. The site relies on volunteer contributors from all over the world, and the game articles provide information on where the games are played as described and who has contributed the rules. The site also describes games that are played with domino-style tiles, which, although similar in spirit, are not strictly speaking card games
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