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Screen Printing
Screen printing
Screen printing
is a printing technique whereby a mesh is used to transfer ink onto a substrate, except in areas made impermeable to the ink by a blocking stencil. A blade or squeegee is moved across the screen to fill the open mesh apertures with ink, and a reverse stroke then causes the screen to touch the substrate momentarily along a line of contact. This causes the ink to wet the substrate and be pulled out of the mesh apertures as the screen springs back after the blade has passed. Screen printing
Screen printing
is also a stencil method of print making in which a design is imposed on a screen of polyester or other fine mesh, with blank areas coated with an impermeable substance. Ink is forced into the mesh openings by the fill blade or squeegee and by wetting the substrate, transferred onto the printing surface during the squeegee stroke. As the screen rebounds away from the substrate the ink remains on the substrate
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Synthetic Polymer
Synthetic polymers are human-made polymers. From the utility point of view they can be classified into four main categories: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers and synthetic fibers. They are found commonly in a variety of consumer products such as money, super glue, etc. A wide variety of synthetic polymers are available with variations in main chain as well as side chains. The back bones of common synthetic polymers such as polythene, polystyrene and poly acrylates are made up of carbon-carbon bonds, whereas hetero chain polymers such as polyamides, polyesters, polyurethanes, polysulfides and polycarbonates have other elements (e.g. oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen) inserted along the backbone. Also silicon forms similar materials without the need of carbon atoms, such as silicones through siloxane linkages; these compounds are thus said to be inorganic polymers
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Subculture
Subculture, a concept from the academic fields of sociology and cultural studies, is a group of people within a culture that differentiates itself from the parent culture to which it belongs, often maintaining some of its founding principles. Subcultures develop their own norms and values regarding cultural, political and sexual matters
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
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Actinic Light
Actinism (/ˈæktɪnɪzəm/) is the property of solar radiation that leads to the production of photochemical and photobiological effects.[1] Actinism is derived from the Greek ακτίς, ακτῖνος (a ray or beam). The word actinism is found, for example, in the terminology of imaging technology (esp
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Chromate And Dichromate
Chromate salts contain the chromate anion, CrO2− 4. Dichromate salts contain the dichromate anion, Cr 2O2− 7. They are oxoanions of chromium in the 6+ oxidation state . They are moderately strong oxidizing agents. In an aqueous solution, chromate and dichromate ions can be interconvertible.Contents1 Chemical properties1.1 Acid–base properties 1.2 Oxidation–reduction properties2 Applications 3 Natural occurrence and production 4 Safety 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksChemical properties[edit]potassium chromatepotassium dichromateChromates react with hydrogen peroxide giving products in which peroxide, O2− 2, replaces one or more oxygen atoms. In acid solution the unstable blue peroxo complex Chromium(VI) oxide peroxide, CrO(O2)2, is formed; it is an uncharged covalent molecule which may be extracted into ether
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Gelatin
Gelatin
Gelatin
or gelatine (from Latin: gelatus meaning "stiff", "frozen") is a translucent, colorless, brittle (when dry), flavorless food derived from collagen obtained from various animal body parts. It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, pharmaceutical drugs, vitamin capsules, photography, and cosmetic manufacturing. Substances containing gelatin or functioning in a similar way are called "gelatinous." Gelatin
Gelatin
is an irreversibly hydrolyzed form of collagen, wherein the hydrolysis results in the reduction of protein fibrils into smaller peptides, which will have broad molecular weight ranges associated with physical and chemical methods of denaturation, based on the process of hydrolysis
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Works Progress Administration
The Works Progress Administration
Works Progress Administration
(WPA; renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration) was the largest and most ambitious American New Deal
New Deal
agency, employing millions of people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects,[1] including the construction of public buildings and roads. In a much smaller project, Federal Project Number One, the WPA employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects.[1] Almost every community in the United States had a new park, bridge or school constructed by the agency. The WPA's initial appropriation in 1935 was for $4.9 billion (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP).[2] Headed by Harry Hopkins, the WPA provided jobs and income to the unemployed during the Great Depression
Great Depression
in the United States
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Photostat Machine
The Photostat machine, or Photostat, was an early projection photocopier created in the decade of the 1900s by the Commercial Camera
Camera
Company, which became the Photostat Corporation
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Underground Art
Underground art, is any form of art that operates outside of conventional norms in the art world, part of underground culture. This can include essentially any genre of art that is not popular in the art world, including visionary art and street art. Underground art can include art created both legally and illegally, organized or unauthorized, and can essentially exist in any form. Visionary Art
Art
is often considered a form of underground art because of it popularity outside conventional art channels. Rather than being displayed in galleries and museums, most visionary art is displayed online, at music festivals, or other forms of gatherings such as Burning Man and Rainbow Gatherings. Street Art, also is often considered a form of underground art because of its unconventional settings
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China
China
China
(Chinese: 中国; pinyin: Zhōngguó; literally: 'Central State' or 'Middle Kingdom'), officially the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC), is a country in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.428 billion in 2017
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Marilyn Monroe
Marilyn
Marilyn
Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962) was an American actress, model, and singer. Famous for playing comic "blonde bombshell" characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s and was emblematic of the era's attitudes towards sexuality. Although she was a top-billed actress for only a decade, her films grossed $200 million by the time of her unexpected death in 1962.[1] More than half a century later, she continues to be a major popular culture icon.[2] Born and raised in Los Angeles, Monroe spent most of her childhood in foster homes and an orphanage and married at the age of sixteen. While working in a radioplane factory in 1944 as part of the war effort, she was introduced to a photographer from the First Motion Picture Unit and began a successful pin-up modeling career
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Marilyn Diptych
The Marilyn
Marilyn
Diptych
Diptych
(1962) is a silkscreen painting by American pop artist Andy Warhol. The piece is one of the artist's most noted works, and it has been praised by several cultural critics such as Camille Paglia. The original piece is currently owned by the Tate.Contents1 History and analysis 2 Technique 3 References 4 External linksHistory and analysis[edit] The work was completed during the weeks after Marilyn
Marilyn
Monroe's death in August 1962. Warhol's Ferus Gallery
Ferus Gallery
Los Angeles exhibition ran July 9 through August 4, 1962. Monroe's death on Sunday 5 August was news on the Monday, on which day the Warhol exhibition was being taken down
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Sister Mary Corita Kent
Corita Kent
Corita Kent
(November 20, 1918 – September 18, 1986), born Frances Elizabeth Kent and also known as Sister Mary Corita Kent, was an American Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
religious sister, artist, and educator. She was born in Fort Dodge, Iowa,[1] and later lived and worked in Los Angeles and Boston. She worked almost exclusively with silkscreen, also known as serigraphy, pushing back the limitations of the two-dimensional medium by the development of innovative methods
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Bowling
Bowling
Bowling
is a sport or leisure activity in which a player rolls or throws a bowling ball towards a target. It is one of the major forms of throwing sports. In pin bowling variations, the target is usually to knock over pins at the end of a lane. A strike is when all the pins are knocked down on the first roll, whereas a spare is when all the pins are knocked over on the second shot. The maximum score is 300, which is achieved by getting 12 strikes in a row. Three consecutive strikes is a known as a "turkey". Further strings of strikes are referred to as the number with the word "bagger", such as "four-bagger" for four consecutive strikes. The term "hambone" has also been used to describe four consecutive strikes.[1] In target variations, the aim is usually to get the ball as close to a mark as possible
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CMYK Color Model
The CMYK color model
CMYK color model
(process color, four color) is a subtractive color model, used in color printing, and is also used to describe the printing process itself. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). The reason for black ink being referred to as key is because in four-color printing, cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed, or aligned, with the key of the black key plate. Some sources suggest that the "K" in CMYK comes from the last letter in "black" and was chosen because B already means blue.[1][2] However, some people disagree with this because there is no blue in the primary CMYK colors; it is made with cyan and magenta. Some sources claim this explanation, although useful as a mnemonic, is incorrect, that K comes only from "Key" because black is often used as outline and printed first
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