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Scottish Parliament
Government (62)[1]     Scottish National Party
Scottish National Party
(62)Opposition (66)[1]     Conservative (31)      Labour (22)      Green (6)      Liberal Democrats (5)      Independents (2)Presiding Officer (1)     PO (1)Committees16Audit Equal Opportunities Europe and External Relations Finance Procedures Public Petitions Standards and Public Appointments Subordinate Legislation Economy, Ener
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Local Government Of Scotland
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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Voting System
An electoral system is a set of rules that determines how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined. Political electoral systems are organized by governments, while non-political elections may take place in business, non-profit organisations and informal organisations. Electoral systems consist of sets of rules that govern all aspects of the voting process: when elections occur, who is allowed to vote, who can stand as a candidate, how ballots are marked and cast, how the ballots are counted (electoral method), limits on campaign spending, and other factors that can affect the outcome
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Unicameral
In government, unicameralism (Latin uni, one + camera, chamber) is the practice of having one legislative or parliamentary chamber. Thus, a unicameral parliament or unicameral legislature is a legislature which consists of one chamber or house.Contents1 Concept 2 List of unicameral legislatures2.1 National 2.2 Territorial 2.3 Subnational2.3.1 Federations 2.3.2 Devolved governments 2.3.3 Other3 List of historical Unicameral legislatures3.1 National 3.2 Subnational4 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
within the subdivisions of the United States 5 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
in the Philippines 6 ReferencesConcept[edit] Unicameral legislatures exist when there is no widely perceived need for multicameralism. Many multicameral legislatures were created to give separate voices to different sectors of society
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Shadow Cabinet (Scottish Parliament)
Unlike the Westminster arrangement
Westminster arrangement
where there is an 'Official Opposition' to the government of the day, there is no such thing as an 'official' opposition to the Scottish Government. Instead, all parties that are not in government are merely 'opposition parties'
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UK Parliament
HM Government     Conservative Party (245)Confidence and supply     Democratic Unionist
Democratic Unionist
Party (3)HM Most Loyal Opposition     Labour Party (191)Other opposition     Liberal Democrats (98)      Non-affiliated (29)      UKIP (3)      Ind. Labour (3)      Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2)      Green Party (1)      Ind. Social Democrat (1)      Ind
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Additional Member System
The additional member system (AMS), also known as mixed-member proportional representation (MMP) outside the United Kingdom,[1][2][3][4] is a mixed electoral system with one tier of single-member district representatives, and another tier of "additional members" elected to make the overall election results more proportional. The term additional member system, introduced by the Hansard Society, has been largely replaced in the literature by the term mixed member proportional coined by New Zealand's Royal Commission on the Electoral System (1984-1986).[5] This article focuses primarily on semi-proportional implementations of MMP designed to yield moderately proportional election results, similar to the mixed systems used in the UK and referred to locally as AMS
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Executive Agencies Of The Scottish Government
Executive agencies are established by Ministers as part of Scottish Government departments, or as departments in their own right, to carry out a discrete area of work. Agencies are staffed by civil servants. Executive agencies were first established following Sir Robin Ibbs' (then head of the Efficiency Unit) "Next Steps" Report in 1988. The intention was that they would take responsibility for, and bring a new, more customer-focused approach to, individual executive (service delivery) functions within government
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Scottish Public Bodies
Public bodies of the Scottish Government are organisations that are funded by the Scottish Government. It is a tightly meshed network of executive and advisory non-departmental public bodies ("quangoes"); tribunals; and nationalised industries. These public bodies are distinct from executive agencies of the Scottish Government, as they are not considered to be part of the Government and staff of public bodies are not civil servants.Contents1 Governance 2 List of public bodies2.1 Non-ministerial government departments 2.2 Executive NDPBs 2.3 Advisory NDPBs 2.4 Tribunals 2.5 Public corporations 2.6 Executive agencies 2.7 Other significant national bodies 2.8 Former public bodies3 External linksGovernance[edit] The Scottish Government is responsible for appointing a board of directors to run public bodies
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Scottish Government
The Scottish Government
Scottish Government
(Scottish Gaelic: Riaghaltas na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Govrenment) is Scotland's devolved government.[1] The government was established in 1999 as the Scottish Executive under the Scotland Act 1998, which created a devolved administration for Scotland
Scotland
in line with the result of the 1997 referendum on Scottish devolution.[2] The government consists of cabinet secretaries, who attend cabinet meetings, and ministers, who do not
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Crown Office And Procurator Fiscal Service
The Crown
The Crown
Office and Procurator Fiscal
Procurator Fiscal
Service (Scottish Gaelic: Oifis an Ard-Ghnìomhachas agus Seirbheis Neach-casaid an Ard-Ghnìomhachas, Scots: Croun Office an Procurator Fiscal
Procurator Fiscal
Service) is the independent public prosecution service for Scotland, and is a Ministerial Department of the Scottish Government. The department is headed by Her Majesty's Lord Advocate, who under the Scottish legal system is responsible for prosecution, along with the area Procurators fiscal. In Scotland, virtually all prosecution of criminal offences is undertaken by the Crown
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Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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Deputy First Minister Of Scotland
The Deputy First Minister of Scotland
First Minister of Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Leas-Phrìomh Mhinistear na h-Alba; Scots: Heid Meinister Depute o Scotland) is the deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. The post-holder deputises for the First Minister of Scotland
First Minister of Scotland
in period of absence or overseas visits, and will be expected to answer to the Scottish Parliament
Scottish Parliament
on behalf of the First Minister at First Minister's Questions.Contents1 Functioning responsibilities 2 Nomination and election 3 Acting First Minister 4 List of Deputy First Ministers 5 References 6 See alsoFunctioning responsibilities[edit] The post is not recognised in statute (in comparison with the post of First Minister which is established by the Scotland
Scotland
Act 1998), and its holder is simply an ordinary member of the Scottish Government
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Legislative Consent Motion
A Legislative Consent Motion
Legislative Consent Motion
(also known as a Sewel motion) is a motion passed by either the Scottish Parliament, Welsh Assembly, or Northern Ireland Assembly, in which it agrees that the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
may pass legislation on a devolved issue over which the devolved body has regular legislative authority.Contents1 Background 2 Use and application 3 Legal status 4 Current situation and review 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] The Scotland
Scotland
Act 1998 devolved many issues relating to legislation for Scotland
Scotland
to the Scottish Parliament
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Second Sturgeon Government
Nicola Sturgeon
Nicola Sturgeon
formed the second Sturgeon government following her Scottish National Party's victory in the 2016 Scottish Parliament election. Sturgeon was nominated by a vote of the 5th Scottish Parliament for appointment to the post of First Minister on 17 May 2016.[1] She was subsequently appointed by Queen Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
on 18 May, and announced formation of a new Scottish National Party
Scottish National Party
minority government.[2]Contents1 History 2 List of ministers2.1 Cabinet[5][6] 2.2 Junior ministers[7] 2.3 Law officers[4]3 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the May 2016 Scottish Parliament
Scottish Parliament
election, the Scottish National Party (SNP) won 63 of the 129 seats contested. Incumbent First Minister Nicola Sturgeon
Nicola Sturgeon
soon afterwards announced her intention to form a minority government
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