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Scott Thomas Beauchamp Controversy
The Scott Thomas Beauchamp controversy concerns the publication of a series of diaries by Scott Thomas Beauchamp (b. 1983 St. Louis, Missouri) – a private in the United States Army, serving in the Iraq War, and a member of Alpha Company, 1-18 Infantry, Second Brigade Combat Team, First Infantry Division. In 2007, using the pen name "Scott Thomas", Beauchamp filed three entries in The New Republic (TNR) about serving at forward operating base Falcon, Baghdad. These entries concerned alleged misconduct by soldiers, including Beauchamp, in post-invasion Iraq. Several publications and bloggers questioned Beauchamp's statements. A U.S. Army investigation had concluded the statements in the material were false
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St. Louis
St. Louis (/snt ˈlɪs/) is an independent city (city not in a county) in the U.S. state of Missouri. It is the second largest city in the state of Missouri behind Kansas City, Missouri"> Kansas City. It is situated along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which forms the state line between Illinois and Missouri. The Missouri River"> Missouri River merges with the Mississippi River 15 river miles north of Downtown St. Louis, forming the fourth-longest river system in the world. The estimated 2018 population of the city proper was 302,838 and the bi-state metropolitan area was 2,804,724. Greater St
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Missouri
Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States"> Midwestern United States. With over six million residents, it is the 18th-most populous state of the Union. The largest urban areas are Kansas City metropolitan area"> Kansas City, St. Louis, Springfield, and Columbia; the capital is Jefferson City, located on the Missouri River"> Missouri River. The state is the 21st-most extensive in area. In the South are the Ozarks, a forested highland, providing timber, minerals, and recreation. The Mississippi River"> Mississippi River forms the eastern border of the state. Humans have inhabited the land now known as Missouri for at least 12,000 years. The Mississippian culture built cities and mounds, before declining in the 1300s. When European explorers arrived in the 1600s they encountered the Osage and Missouria nations
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Special
Special or the specials or variation, may refer to:

Columbia Daily Tribune
The Columbia Daily Tribune, commonly referred to as the Columbia Tribune or the Tribune, is one of two daily newspapers in Columbia, Missouri, the other being the Columbia Missourian. It is also the only daily newspaper in Columbia with circulation verified by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), and it has been a member of that since 1915. It was owned by the Watson/Waters family from 1905 to 2016. Although written to serve the Columbia Metropolitan Area, it is the most widely circulated newspaper in the region of Mid-Missouri
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Washington Post
The Washington Post (sometimes abbreviated as WaPo) is a major American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C., with a particular emphasis on national politics and the federal government. It has the largest circulation in the Washington metropolitan area. Its slogan "Democracy Dies in Darkness" began appearing on its masthead in 2017. Daily broadsheet editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year. Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House News Photographers Association awards
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Howard Kurtz
Howard is an English-language given name originating from Old Norse Hávarðr, which means "high guard". A diminutive is "Howie" and its shortened form is "Ward" (most common in the 19th century). Between 1900-1960, Howard ranked in the U.S. Top 200; between 1960–1990, it ranked in the U.S. Top 400; between 1990–2004, it ranked in the U.S
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Michael Goldfarb (political Writer)
Michael Goldfarb (born June 6, 1980) is an American conservative political writer
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The New York Times
The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S. Nicknamed "The Gray Lady," the Times has long been regarded within the industry as a national " Newspaper of record">newspaper of record." The paper's motto, "All the News That's Fit to Print", appears in the upper left-hand corner of the front page. The paper is owned by The New York Times Company"> The New York Times Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure. It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Drudge Report
The Drudge Report is an American conservative, right-wing news aggregation website. It is run by Matt Drudge with the help of Charles Hurt, the site consists mainly of links to news stories from other outlets about politics, entertainment, and current events; it also has links to many columnists
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Associated Press
The Associated Press (AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. Its members are U.S. newspapers and broadcasters. The AP has earned 53 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. It earned a 2019 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the civil war in Yemen. The AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures. AP collects and verifies returns in every county, parish, city and town across the U.S., and declares winners in over 5,000 contests. The AP news report, distributed to its members and customers, is produced in English, Spanish and Arabic. AP content is also available on the agency's app, AP News
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Kuwait
Kuwait (/kʊˈwt/ (About this sound listen); Arabic: الكويتal-Kuwait, Gulf Arabic pronunciation: [ɪl‿ɪkweːt] or [lɪkweːt]), officially the State of Kuwait (Arabic: دولة الكويتAbout this sound Dawlat al-Kuwait), is a country in Western Asia. Situated in the northern edge of Eastern Arabia at the tip of the Persian Gulf, it shares borders with Iraq and Saudi Arabia. As of 2016, Kuwait has a population of 4.2 million people; 1.3 million are Kuwaitis and 2.9 million are expatriates. Expatriates account for 70% of the population. Oil reserves were discovered in commercial quantities in 1938. From 1946 to 1982, the country underwent large-scale modernization
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Fact Checker
Fact checking is the act of checking factual assertions in non-fictional text in order to determine the veracity and correctness of the factual statements in the text. This may be done either before (ante hoc) or after (post hoc) the text has been published or otherwise disseminated. Ante hoc fact-checking (fact checking before dissemination) aims to remove errors and allow text to proceed to dissemination (or to rejection if it fails confirmations or other criteria). Post hoc fact-checking is most often followed by a written report of inaccuracies, sometimes with a visual metric from the checking organization (e.g., Pinocchios from The Washington Post Fact Checker, or TRUTH-O-METER ratings from PolitiFact)
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The Washington Post
The Washington Post (sometimes abbreviated to WaPo) is a major American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. Daily broadsheet editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times's seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year. Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House News Photographers Association awards. In the early 1970s, in the best-known episode in the newspaper's history, reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein led the American press's investigation into what became known as the Watergate scandal. Their reporting in The Washington Post greatly contributed to the resignation of President Richard Nixon
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