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Scioto River
The Scioto River
Scioto River
(/saɪˈoʊtoʊ/ sy-OH-toh or /saɪˈoʊtə/ sy-OH-tə) is a river in central and southern Ohio
Ohio
more than 231 miles (372 km) in length.[4] It rises in Auglaize County
Auglaize County
in west central Ohio, flows through Columbus, Ohio, where it collects its largest tributary, the Olentangy River, and meets the Ohio River
Ohio River
at Portsmouth
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LaRue, Ohio
LaRue is a village in Marion County, Ohio, United States. The population was 747 at the 2010 census. The village is served by Elgin Local School District. LaRue has a public library, a branch of Marion Public Library.[6]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics2.1 2010 census 2.2 2000 census3 History 4 Events 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] LaRue is located at 40°34′38″N 83°22′57″W / 40.57722°N 83.38250°W / 40.57722; -83.38250 (40.577262, −83.382396).[7] According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.48 square miles (1.24 km2), all land.[1] Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1880 614—1890 94854.4%1900 9975.2%1910 772−22.6%1920 7953.0%1930 698−12.2%1940 7142.3%1950 79311.1%1960 8426.2%1970 8673.0%1980 861−0.7%1990 802−6.9%2000 775−3.4%2010 747−3.6%Est. 2016 710 [8] −5.0%U.S
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Slaves
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
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Burial Mounds
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
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New Hampshire, Ohio
New Hampshire is a census-designated place in central Goshen Township, Auglaize County, Ohio, United States.[1] As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 174.[2] Located between Wapakoneta and Lakeview at the intersection of U.S. Route 33 with State Routes 196 and 385, the village maintains a small post office (Zip Code: 45870) and a country store. History[edit] New Hampshire was laid out in 1836.[3] The community was named after the state of New Hampshire.[4] A post office called New Hampshire has been in operation since 1855.[5] Education[edit] The community is served by the Waynesfield-Goshen Local School District. References[edit]^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: New Hampshire, Ohio ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): New Hampshire CDP, Ohio". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved July 11, 2013.  ^ Sutton, Robert (1880)
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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Wyandot Language
Wyandot (sometimes spelled Waⁿdat) is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot or Wyandotte, descended from the Wendat (Huron). It was last spoken by members located primarily in Oklahoma, United States and Quebec, Canada. Linguists have traditionally considered Wyandot as a dialect or modern form of Wendat. Wyandot essentially died out as a spoken language nearly a century ago, though there are now attempts at revitalization. The Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma is offering Wyandot language classes in the Wyandotte Public Schools, grades K–4, and also at the Wyandotte Nation's preschool "Turtle-Tots" program. The Wendat Community of Quebec is offering adult and children's classes in the Wendat language at its village school in Wendake
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Shenandoah River
The Shenandoah River /ˌʃɛnənˈdoʊə/ is a tributary of the Potomac River, 55.6 miles (89.5 km) long with two forks approximately 100 miles (160 km) long each,[3] in the U.S. states of Virginia and West Virginia
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Iroquoian Language
The Iroquoian languages are a language family of indigenous peoples of North America. They are known for their general lack of labial consonants. The Iroquoian languages are polysynthetic and head-marking.[2] Today, all surviving Iroquoian languages except Cherokee in Oklahoma and Mohawk are severely endangered or critically endangered, with only a few elderly speakers remaining
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Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states a
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2012 North American Drought
The 2012–13 North American drought, an expansion of the 2010–13 Southern United States drought, originated in the midst of a record-breaking heat wave. Low snowfall amounts in winter, coupled with the intense summer heat from La Niña, caused drought-like conditions to migrate northward from the southern United States, wreaking havoc on crops and water supply.[1] The drought has inflicted, and is expected to continue to inflict, catastrophic economic ramifications for the affected states. It has exceeded, in most measures, the 1988–89 North American drought, the most recent comparable drought, and is on track to exceed that drought as the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.[2] The drought includes most of the U.S., parts of Mexico, and central and Eastern Canada. At its peak on July 17, 2012,[citation needed] it covered approximately 81 percent of the contiguous United States with at least abnormally dry (D0) conditions
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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O'Shaughnessy Dam (Ohio)
Ó Seachnasaigh, O'Shaughnessy, collectively Uí Sheachnasaigh, clan name Cinél nAedha na hEchtghe, is a family surname of Irish origin. The name is found primarily in County Galway and County Limerick. Their name derives from Seachnasach mac Donnchadh, a 10th-century member of the Uí Fiachrach Aidhne, which the Ó Seachnasaigh were the senior clan of
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Battelle Memorial Institute
Battelle Memorial Institute (more widely known as simply Battelle) is a private nonprofit applied science and technology development company headquartered in Columbus, Ohio. Battelle is a charitable trust organized as a nonprofit corporation under the laws of the State of Ohio and is exempt from taxation under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code because it is organized for charitable, scientific and education purposes. The institute opened in 1929 but traces its origins to the 1923 will of Ohio industrialist Gordon Battelle which provided for its creation
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