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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Color
Color
Color
(American English) or colour (Commonwealth English) is the characteristic of human visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of cone cells in the human eye by electromagnetic radiation in the visible spectrum. Color
Color
categories and physical specifications of color are associated with objects through the wavelength of the light that is reflected from them. This reflection is governed by the object's physical properties such as light absorption, emission spectra, etc. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by coordinates
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Marching Band
A marching band is a group in which instrumental musicians perform while marching, often for entertainment or competition. Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. Most marching bands wear a uniform, often of a military style, that includes an associated school or organization's colors, name or symbol. Most high school marching bands, and some college marching bands, are accompanied by a color guard, a group of performers who add a visual interpretation to the music through the use of props, most often flags and rifles. Marching
Marching
bands are generally categorized by function, size, age, gender, instrumentation, marching style, and type of show they perform. In addition to traditional parade performances, many marching bands also perform field shows at sporting events and at marching band competitions
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School
A school is an institution designed to provide learning spaces and learning environments for the teaching of students (or "pupils") under the direction of teachers. Most countries have systems of formal education, which is commonly compulsory.[citation needed] In these systems, students progress through a series of schools. The names for these schools vary by country (discussed in the Regional section below) but generally include primary school for young children and secondary school for teenagers who have completed primary education. An institution where higher education is taught, is commonly called a university college or university. In addition to these core schools, students in a given country may also attend schools before and after primary and secondary education. Kindergarten
Kindergarten
or pre-school provide some schooling to very young children (typically ages 3–5)
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Yellow
Yellow
Yellow
is the color between green and orange on the spectrum of visible light. It is evoked by light with a dominant wavelength of roughly 570–590 nm. It is a primary color in subtractive color systems, used in painting or color printing. In the RGB color model, used to create colors on television and computer screens, yellow is a secondary color made by combining red and green at equal intensity. Carotenoids
Carotenoids
give the characteristic yellow color to autumn leaves, corn, canaries, daffodils, and lemons, as well as egg yolks, buttercups, and bananas. They absorb light energy and protect plants from photodamage.[3] Sunlight
Sunlight
has a slight yellowish hue, due to the surface temperature of the sun. Because it was widely available, yellow ochre pigment was one of the first colors used in art; the Lascaux
Lascaux
cave in France has a painting of a yellow horse 17,000 years old
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Old Gold
Old gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow, generally on the darker side of this range. The first recorded use of old gold as a color name in English was in the early 19th century (exact year uncertain).[2]Contents1 In culture1.1 Politics 1.2 Sports2 See also 3 References 4 External linksIn culture[edit] Politics[edit] Old gold is used as a political color by Mebyon Kernow, a Cornish nationalist party. The color is derived from Cornish kilts and tartans.[citation needed]Sports[edit] Old gold is used for some NFL teams: the New Orleans Saints, the Los Angeles Rams, and the San Francisco 49ers
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
is a limited-contact sport played on a rectangular court. While most often played as a team sport with five players on each side, three-on-three, two-on-two, and one-on-one competitions are also common. The objective is to shoot a basketball (approximately 9.4 inches (24 cm) in diameter) through a hoop 18 inches (46 cm) in diameter and 10 feet (3.048 m) high that is mounted to a backboard at each end of the court. The game was invented in 1891 by Dr. James Naismith. A team can score a field goal by shooting the ball through the basket being defended by the opposition team during regular play. A field goal scores three points for the shooting team if the player shoots from behind the three-point line, and two points if shot from in front of the line. A team can also score via free throws, which are worth one point, after the other team is assessed with certain fouls
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Cheerleading
Cheerleading
Cheerleading
is an activity wherein the participants (referred to as "cheerleaders") cheer for their team as a form of encouragement. It can range from chanting slogans to intense physical activity. It can be performed to motivate sports teams, entertain the audience, or for competition. Competitive routines typically range anywhere from one to three minutes, and contain components of tumbling, dance, jumps, cheers, and stunting. Cheerleading
Cheerleading
originated in the United States, and remains predominantly in America, with an estimated 1.5 million participants in all-star cheerleading
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American Council On Education
The American Council on Education (ACE) is a U.S. higher education organization established in 1918. Located in Washington, DC, it comprises approximately 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations. The organization conducts public policy advocacy, research, and other initiatives related to key higher education issues and plays a significant role in higher education leadership development.Contents1 Leadership 2 Programs and activities 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLeadership[edit] In July 2017, ACE announced that Ted Mitchell,[1] the former undersecretary of post-secondary education at the U.S. Department of Education, would take over for Molly Corbett Broad[2][3] as president. Mitchell began his duties on September 1, 2017.The board chair is Judy C. Miner, chancellor of the Foothill-De Anza Community College District (CA)
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United States Of America
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Awards
An award is something given to a person, a group of people, like a sports team, or an organization in recognition of their excellence in a certain field.[1][2] An award may be accompanied by trophy, title, certificate, commemorative plaque, medal, badge, pin, or ribbon. An award may carry a monetary prize given to the recipient. For example: the Nobel Prize
Prize
for contributions to society, or the Pulitzer prize for literary achievements
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Sporting Colours
Sporting colours, more often known merely as [1]colours or house-colours, are awarded to members of a university or school who have excelled in a sport. Colours are traditionally worn in or on scarves, ties, blazers, gowns, cuff-links, and other items of apparel. The award system gives rise to phrases such as an Oxford Blue, meaning a person who was awarded a Blue by the University of Oxford. Similarly a Cambridge Blue is awarded by the University of Cambridge. Colours are not however, always known as 'a Blue'. A 'university sporting blue' is a generic term which stems from the Oxford and Cambridge Blue, but 'Colours' by definition may be any colour, and often reflect the colours associated with the school uniform, crest, or other significant semiotic. In some award schemes, it is possible to receive a half colour, such as a Half-Blue
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Academic Scarf
The wearing of academic scarves is a tradition found at many colleges and universities in English-speaking countries, and particularly in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Ireland. Sets of two or more coloured stripes have traditionally been used as part of the distinctive visual identity of these institutions.[1] The scarves are usually made of Saxony Wool
Saxony Wool
and about 2 metres long. The college colours are used in clothing and symbols of all kinds, from ties to trophies, but notably in the long woollen winter scarves that students and alumni wear to show their pride in their institutions. At some universities, in addition to collegiate scarves, there are also several non-collegiate scarves which have a well-established meaning. For example, those representing the University in sport may be entitled to wear a particular scarf, depending on their level of achievement, or a university department or club may have its own scarf
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Collegiate University
A collegiate university is a university in which functions are divided between a central administration and a number of constituent colleges. The two principal forms are residential college universities, where the central university is responsible for teaching and colleges may deliver some teaching but are primarily residential communities, and federal universities where the central university has an administrative (and sometimes examining) role and the colleges may be residential but are primarily teaching institutions
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Lancaster University
" Quaker
Quaker
Grey" and red                                          Colleges   Bowland    Cartmel    County    Furness    Fylde    Graduate    Grizedale    Lonsdale    PendleAffiliations N8 Group, ACU, AACSB, AMBA, NWUA, EQUIS, Universities UKWebsite www.lancaster.ac.ukLancaster University, also officially known as the University of Lancaster,[5] is a public research university in the City of Lancaster, Lancashire, England
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