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Schlafmütze
Schlafmütze is a fast-paced game of matching and bluffing, which is closely related to the English game spoons (or pig and tongue). The game requires a minimum of two players, but ideally a minimum of three players, and involves each player passing round cards in an attempt to acquire a hand consisting of all the same value cards (e.g. four 7s if the players each have four cards, or 3 Queens if the players each have three cards)
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Shedding-type Game
A shedding-type card game is a game in which the player's objective is to empty one's hand of all cards before all other players
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Speed (card Game)
Speed is a game for two players of the shedding family of card games, in which each player tries to get rid of all of his or her cards.[1]Contents1 Dealing 2 Play2.1 Jokers 2.2 Verbal Win 2.3 Three- and Four-Way Speed 2.4 California Spit 2.5 Spit3 Strategy 4 See also 5 ReferencesDealing[edit] [2] Each player is dealt five cards to form a hand, and each player is dealt 15 cards face down to form a draw pile. If playing with jokers, they are used as wild cards and give each draw pile 16 cards. Two stacks of five cards, placed face down on each side between the players, serve as replacement piles. Finally, two cards are placed face down in the center between the replacement piles. Play[edit] The round begins when the players each flip one of the face-down cards in the center at the same time
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Bluff (poker)
In the card game of poker, a bluff is a bet or raise made with a hand which is not thought to be the best hand. To bluff is to make such a bet. The objective of a bluff is to induce a fold by at least one opponent who holds a better hand. The size and frequency of a bluff determines its profitability to the bluffer. By extension, the phrase "calling somebody's bluff" is often used outside the context of poker to describe cases where one person "demand[s] that someone prove a claim" or prove that he or she "is not being deceptive."[1]Contents1 Pure bluff 2 Semi-bluff 3 Bluffing circumstances 4 Optimal bluffing frequency 5 Bluffing in other games 6 Artificial intelligence 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesPure bluff[edit] A pure bluff, or stone-cold bluff, is a bet or raise with an inferior hand that has little or no chance of improving. A player making a pure bluff believes he can win the pot only if all opponents fold
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Drinking Game
Drinking games are games which involve the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Evidence of the existence of drinking games dates back to antiquity. Drinking games have been banned at some institutions, particularly colleges and universities.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient Greece 1.2 Ancient China2 Types2.1 Endurance 2.2 Speed 2.3 Skill 2.4 Thinking 2.5 Card and dice 2.6 Arts 2.7 Hybrid games 2.8 Mobile app games3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Symposium, with scene of Kottabos
Kottabos
- fresco from the Tomb of the Diver in Paestum, 475 BCWager cup (Dublin, Ireland)[2]Ancient Greece[edit] Kottabos
Kottabos
is one of the earliest known drinking games from ancient Greece, dated to the 5th to 4th centuries BC. Players would use dregs to hit targets across the room with their wine
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Drinking Games
Drinking games are games which involve the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Evidence of the existence of drinking games dates back to antiquity. Drinking games have been banned at some institutions, particularly colleges and universities.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient Greece 1.2 Ancient China2 Types2.1 Endurance 2.2 Speed 2.3 Skill 2.4 Thinking 2.5 Card and dice 2.6 Arts 2.7 Hybrid games 2.8 Mobile app games3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Symposium, with scene of Kottabos
Kottabos
- fresco from the Tomb of the Diver in Paestum, 475 BCWager cup (Dublin, Ireland)[2]Ancient Greece[edit] Kottabos
Kottabos
is one of the earliest known drinking games from ancient Greece, dated to the 5th to 4th centuries BC. Players would use dregs to hit targets across the room with their wine
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Bartok (card Game)
The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Creating new rules 1.2 Penalties2 Mao 3 See also 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the center and mixed
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Screw Your Neighbour
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
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Daifugō
Daifugō
Daifugō
(大富豪, Grand Millionaire) or Daihinmin (大貧民, Extreme Needy) is a Japanese card game for three or more players played with a standard 52-card pack. The objective of the game is to get rid of all the cards one has as fast as possible by playing progressively stronger cards than those of the previous player. The winner is called the daifugō (the grand millionaire) earning various advantages in the next round, and the last person is called the daihinmin (the extreme needy). In that following round, winners can exchange their one or more unnecessary cards for advantageous ones that losers have. The game is very similar to the Chinese climbing card games Big Two and Zheng Shangyou, to the Vietnamese game Tien Len, and to Western card games like President, also known as Capitalism and Asshole, and The Great Dalmuti
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Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
– also known as find the lady and three-card trick – is a confidence game in which the victim, or "mark", is tricked into betting a sum of money, on the assumption that they can find the "money card" among three face-down playing cards. It is the same as the shell game except that cards are used instead of shells.[1] In its full form, three-card Monte is an example of a classic "short con"[2] in which a shill pretends to conspire with the mark to cheat the dealer, while in fact conspiring with the dealer to cheat the mark. The mark has no chance whatsoever of winning, at any point in the game
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Mau Mau (card Game)
Mau Mau is a card game for 2 or more players that is popular in Germany, the United States, Brazil, Poland, and the Netherlands. For more than 5 players, 2 packs of cards may be used. Whoever gets rid of his/her cards first wins the game. Mau Mau is very similar to the game Uno and Flaps, both belonging to the larger Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
or shedding family of card games. However Mau Mau is played with a regular deck of playing cards.Contents1 Rules 2 History 3 Endgame 4 Spelling variants 5 Popular additional rules5.1 Switch 5.2 Peanuckle 5.3 Prší 5.4 Faraón6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingRules[edit] The game is played with a regular deck of playing cards. The players are dealt each a hand of cards (usually 5). The rest are placed face down as the drawing stack
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Craits
Craits
Craits
(sometimes spelled Crates or Creights) is a card game played by anywhere between two and five players. It was invented in the 1970s in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is derived from Crazy Eights; in fact, the name Craits
Craits
is derived from Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
itself. Craits
Craits
is similar to the marketed game Uno, which has its own specialized deck, and many cards assume the functions of Uno's specialized cards.Contents1 Rules1.1 Basic Principles 1.2 The Play 1.3 Functions of each card 1.4 The Count2 Scoring2.1 Scoring Threes 2.2 Shuffle Pressure3 Variations3.1 Variation that gives functions to face cards4 See alsoRules[edit] Basic Principles[edit] A standard deck of 52 playing cards is used; if more than five players wish to play, two decks may be used
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Cheat (game)
Cheat (also known as B.S., bluff, and I-doubt-it[1]) is a card game where the players aim to get rid of all of their cards.[2][3] It is a game of deception, with cards being played face-down and players being permitted to lie about the cards they have played. A challenge is usually made by players calling out the name of the game, and the loser of a challenge has to pick up every card played so far. Cheat is classed as a party game.[2] As with many card games, cheat has an oral tradition and so people are taught the game under different names
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Dupa Biskupa
Dupa biskupa[1] [ˈdupa bisˈkupa] refers to several friendly card games in Poland.[2] The name is a Polish phrase meaning 'bishop's buttocks'.Contents1 General rules 2 Popular culture 3 References 4 External linksGeneral rules[edit] As dupa biskupa is a friendly game, it does not involve any exact amount of rounds and cards to use or even a set number players. There is one general rule; the more players there are, the more cards are in use.[3] The game starts with the deal assuring that each player receives the same number of cards. Starting from the first, players lay down cards in such a way that everyone can see the card. Having laid the card, the player has to do a certain act established before starting the game and attributed to the height and colour of the card or stay still without doing anything (depending on the card being played)
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Durak
Durak
Durak
(Russian: Дурак, IPA: [dʊˈrak] ( listen), "fool") is a card game that is popular in post-Soviet states. The objective of the game is to get rid of all one's cards when there are no more cards left in the deck (see rules). At the end of the game, the last player with cards in their hand is the fool.Contents1 Setup 2 Gameplay2.1 Attack 2.2 Defense 2.3 End of turn 2.4 Winning and losing 2.5 Team play 2.6 "Fool with epaulettes"3 Other variants and rules 4 See also 5 External linksSetup[edit] The game is typically played with two to five people, using a deck of 36 cards, for example a standard 52-card deck from which the numerical cards 2 through 5 have been removed. The game can be played with six people if desired. In theory the limit for a game with one deck of 36 cards is six players, but this gives a considerable advantage to the player who attacks first, and a considerable disadvantage to the player who defends first
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Jack Change It
Jack Change It is a simple card game popular among children. It is usually played by two to six players, although theoretically it can be played with up to ten. This game is a shedding-type card game whose purpose is to discard all of your cards before your opponents.Contents1 Basic game 2 Trick cards2.1 Ace of Hearts 2.2 2 2.3 8 2.4 Jack 2.5 Queen 2.6 King3 Further Variations 4 StrategyBasic game[edit] Using one or more decks of cards, seven cards are dealt to each player, and the remaining cards are placed between the players, with the top card turned face up beside the deck, often called the "pile". The object of the game is to play all your cards on the pile before your opponent(s), and the game ends when one player wins by playing all of their cards, although some games continue until there is only one player left. The player to the left of the dealer plays first, choosing a card that matches either the suit or the rank of the card on the pile
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