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Scammell
Scammell
Scammell
Lorries Limited was a British manufacturer of trucks, particularly specialist and military off-highway vehicles, from 1921 to 1988.Contents1 History1.1 Scammell
Scammell
Lorries 1.2 Leyland Group subsidiary 1.3 Closure2 In popular culture 3 Vehicle list 4 Products4.1 Rigid 6/8 4.2 Showtrac 4.3 Handyman 4.4 Trunker 4.5 Contractor 4.6 Crusader 4.7 Commander tank transporter5 See also 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Scammell
Scammell
started as a late-Victorian period wheelwright and coach-building business, G Scammell
Scammell
& Nephew Ltd in Spitalfields, London. George Scammell, the founder, was joined by his nephew Richard and Richard's sons Alfred and James. By the early 1900s, the firm had become financially stable, providing maintenance to customers of Foden steam wagons
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DAF Trucks
DAF Trucks
DAF Trucks
NV is a Dutch truck manufacturing company and a division of Paccar. Its headquarters and main plant are in Eindhoven. Cabs and axle assemblies are produced at its Westerlo
Westerlo
plant in Belgium
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Artillery
Artillery
Artillery
is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms. Early artillery development focused on the ability to breach fortifications, and led to heavy, fairly immobile siege engines. As technology improved, lighter, more mobile field artillery developed for battlefield use. This development continues today; modern self-propelled artillery vehicles are highly mobile weapons of great versatility providing the largest share of an army's total firepower. In its earliest sense, the word artillery referred to any group of soldiers primarily armed with some form of manufactured weapon or armour. Since the introduction of gunpowder and cannon, the word "artillery" has largely meant cannon, and in contemporary usage, it usually refers to shell-firing guns, howitzers, mortars, rockets and guided missiles
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel, which is injected into the combustion chamber, is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to the mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. With the fuel being injected into the air just before combustion, the dispersion of the fuel is uneven; this is called a heterogeneous air-fuel mixture
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6x4 (drivetrain)
A 6×4 drivetrain (six-by-four) is a vehicle with a drivetrain of three axles delivering power to two wheel ends on two of them.[1] It is a form of four-wheel drive[2] but not one of all-wheel drive. It is the most common form of drivetrain of semi-tractors[2] and heavy haul fixed-chassis cargo trucks in larger countries such as the United States and Australia; in Europe, 4×2 and 6×2 variants are more commonplace. See also[edit]Four-wheel drive Six-wheel driveReferences[edit]^ International ProStar ES Class 8 truck: Axle configurations ^ a b NACFE (North American Council for Freight Efficiency) Executive Report – 6x2 (Dead Axle) Tractors [1] "A typical three axle Class 8 tractor today is equipped with two rear drive axles (“live” tandem) and is commonly referred to as a 6 X 4 configuration meaning that it has four-wheel drive
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Suspension (vehicle)
Suspension is the system of tires, tire air, springs, shock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels and allows relative motion between the two.[1] Suspension systems must support both roadholding/handling and ride quality,[2] which are at odds with each other. The tuning of suspensions involves finding the right compromise. It is important for the suspension to keep the road wheel in contact with the road surface as much as possible, because all the road or ground forces acting on the vehicle do so through the contact patches of the tires. The suspension also protects the vehicle itself and any cargo or luggage from damage and wear
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Oil Field
An "oil field" or "oilfield" is a region with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (crude oil) from below ground. Because the oil reservoirs typically extend over a large area, possibly several hundred kilometres across, full exploitation entails multiple wells scattered across the area. In addition, there may be exploratory wells probing the edges, pipelines to transport the oil elsewhere, and support facilities. Because an oil field may be remote from civilization, establishing a field is often an extremely complicated exercise in logistics. This goes beyond requirements for drilling, to include associated infrastructure. For instance, workers require housing to allow them to work onsite for months or years. In turn, housing and equipment require electricity and water. In cold regions, pipelines may need to be heated
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Forestry
Forestry
Forestry
is the science and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests, woodlands, and associated resources for human and environmental benefits.[1] Forestry
Forestry
is practiced in plantations and natural stands.[2] The science of forestry has elements that belong to the biological, physical, social, political and managerial sciences.[3] Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as "sinks" for atmospheric carbon dioxide. A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester
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Logging
Logging
Logging
is the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto trucks[1] or skeleton cars. In forestry, the term logging is sometimes used narrowly to describe the logistics of moving wood from the stump to somewhere outside the forest, usually a sawmill or a lumber yard. In common usage, however, the term may cover a range of forestry or silviculture activities. Illegal logging
Illegal logging
refers to what in forestry might be called timber theft by the timber mafia.[2][3] It can also refer to the harvesting, transportation, purchase, or sale of timber in violation of laws
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Glass-reinforced Plastic
Fiberglass
Fiberglass
(US) or fibreglass (UK) is a common type of fiber-reinforced plastic using glass fiber. The fibers may be randomly arranged, flattened into a sheet (called a chopped strand mat), or woven into a fabric. The plastic matrix may be a thermoset polymer matrix – most often based on thermosetting polymers such as epoxy, polyester resin, or vinylester – or a thermoplastic. Cheaper and more flexible than carbon fiber, it is stronger than many metals by weight, and can be molded into complex shapes. Applications include aircraft, boats, automobiles, bath tubs and enclosures, swimming pools, hot tubs, septic tanks, water tanks, roofing, pipes, cladding, casts, surfboards, and external door skins. Other common names for fiberglass are glass-reinforced plastic (GRP),[1] glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP)[2] or GFK (from German: Glasfaserverstärkter Kunststoff)
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Petrol
Gasoline
Gasoline
(American English), or petrol (British English), is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. On average, a 42-gallon barrel of crude oil (159 L) yields about 19 US gallons (72 L) of gasoline when processed in an oil refinery, though this varies based on the crude oil source's assay. The characteristic of a particular gasoline blend to resist igniting too early (which causes knocking and reduces efficiency in reciprocating engines) is measured by its octane rating. Gasoline
Gasoline
is produced in several grades of octane rating
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Operation Desert Shield
Coalition victoryIraqi forces expelled from Kuwait Kuwaiti monarchy restored Destruction of Iraqi and Kuwaiti infrastructure Failed Shia/Kurdish uprisings against the Iraqi government Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein
regime of the Iraqi Baathist government retains power in Iraq UN sanctions against Iraq United Nations Security Council Resolution 687
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Short Tons
The short ton is a unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds (907.18474 kg). The term is most commonly used in the United States where it is known simply as the ton.[1]Contents1 United States 2 United Kingdom 3 International usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesUnited States[edit] In the United States, a short ton is usually known simply as a "ton",[1] without distinguishing it from the tonne (1,000 kilograms or 2,204.62262 pounds), known there as the "metric ton", or the long ton also known as the "Imperial ton" (2,240 pounds or 1,016.0469088 kilograms). There are, however, some U.S. applications where unspecified tons normally means long tons (for example, naval ships)[2] or metric tons (world grain production figures). Both the long and short ton are defined as 20 hundredweights, but a hundredweight is 100 pounds (45.359237 kg) in the U.S
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Cummins
Cummins
Cummins
Inc. is an American Fortune 500
Fortune 500
corporation that designs, manufactures, and distributes engines, filtration, and power generation products.[3] Cummins
Cummins
also services engines and related equipment, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission control and electrical power generation systems. Headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, United States, Cummins
Cummins
sells in approximately 190 countries and territories through a network of more than 600 company-owned and independent distributors and approximately 6,000 dealers
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Two-stroke Diesel Engine
A two-stroke diesel engine is a diesel engine that works in two strokes. A diesel engine is an internal combustion engine that operates using the Diesel cycle. Invented in 1892 by German engineer Rudolf Diesel, it was based on the hot-bulb engine design and patented on February 23, 1893. During the period of 1900 to 1930, four-stroke diesel engines enjoyed a relative dominance in practical diesel applications. Charles F. Kettering
Charles F

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