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Saving Hope
Saving Hope
Saving Hope
was a Canadian supernatural medical drama television series set in the fictional Hope Zion Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. The show's premise originated with Malcolm MacRury and Morwyn Brebner, who are both credited as creators and executive producers. The pilot was filmed in Toronto. Saving Hope
Saving Hope
initially aired from June 7, 2012, to August 3, 2017, on CTV, and on NBC
NBC
for its first season. During the course of the series, 85 episodes of Saving Hope
Saving Hope
aired over five seasons.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast and characters2.1 Main 2.2 Recurring3 Overview 4 Production4.1 Conception5 Reception5.1 Ratings 5.2 Reviews6 Broadcast 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPlot[edit] The protagonist of the show is Dr. Alex Reid (Erica Durance), a doctor whose fiancé, Dr
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Medical Drama
A medical drama is a television program or film[1] in which events center upon a hospital, an ambulance staff, or any medical environment and most medical episodes are one hour long and set in a hospital. Most current medical dramatic programming go beyond the events pertaining to the characters' jobs and portray some aspects of their personal lives. A typical medical drama might have a storyline in which two doctors fall in love. Communications theorist Marshall McLuhan, in his 1964 work on the nature of media, predicted success for this particular genre on TV because the medium "creates an obsession with bodily welfare".[2]Currently, the longest running medical drama in the world is the British series Casualty, airing since 1986.[3] History[edit] City Hospital, which first aired in 1951, is generally considered to be the first televised medical drama. (The first serialized medical drama was probably the Dr. Kildare
Dr

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Neurosurgeon
orBachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
Surgery
(M.B.B.S.) with Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (F.R.C.S.)orMaster of Surgery
Surgery
(M.S.)or
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1080i
1080i
1080i
(also known as Full HD or BT.709) is an abbreviation referring to a combination of frame resolution and scan type, used in high-definition television (HDTV) and high-definition video. The number "1080" refers to the number of horizontal lines on the screen. The "i" is an abbreviation for "interlaced"; this indicates that only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. A related display resolution is 1080p, which also has 1080 lines of resolution; the "p" refers to progressive scan, which indicates that the lines of resolution for each frame are "drawn" in on the screen sequence. The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9 (a rectangular TV that is wider than it is tall), so the 1080 lines of vertical resolution implies 1920 columns of horizontal resolution, or 1920 pixels × 1080 lines
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HDTV
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
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Stereo
Stereophonic sound
Stereophonic sound
or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). In the 2000s, stereo sound is common in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, and cinema.How stereophonic & duophonic sound systems work
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Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital
is the name for audio compression technologies developed by Dolby Laboratories. Originally named Dolby Stereo
Dolby Stereo
Digital until 1994, except for Dolby TrueHD, the audio compression is lossy
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Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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Ontario
Ontario
Ontario
(/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen); French: [ɔ̃taʁjo]) is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
and is located in east-central Canada.[7][8] It is Canada's most populous province[9] accounting for nearly 40 percent[10] of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area
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NBC
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American English language commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast. The network is headquartered at 30 Rockefeller Plaza
30 Rockefeller Plaza
in New York City, with additional major offices near Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(at 10 Universal City Plaza), and Chicago
Chicago
(at the NBC
NBC
Tower). The network is part of the Big Three television networks. NBC
NBC
is sometimes referred to as the "Peacock Network", in reference to its stylized peacock logo, introduced in 1956 to promote the company's innovations in early color broadcasting
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Coma
Coma
Coma
is a state of unconsciousness in which a person cannot be awakened; fails to respond normally to painful stimuli, light, or sound; lacks a normal wake-sleep cycle; and does not initiate voluntary actions.[1] A person in a state of coma is described as being comatose. A distinction is made in the medical community between a real coma and a medically induced coma, the former is a result of circumstances beyond the control of the medical community, while the latter is a means by which medical professionals may allow a patient's injuries to heal in a controlled environment. A comatose person exhibits a complete absence of wakefulness and is unable to consciously feel, speak, hear, or move.[2] For a patient to maintain consciousness, two important neurological components must function. The first is the cerebral cortex—the gray matter that forms the outer layer of the brain
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Bell Media
Bell Media
Bell Media
Inc. (French: Bell Média) is the mass media subsidiary of BCE Inc.
BCE Inc.
(also known as Bell Canada
Bell Canada
Enterprises, the parent company of the former telephone monopoly Bell Canada). Its operations include television broadcasting and production (including the CTV and CTV Two television networks), radio broadcasting (through Bell Media
Bell Media
Radio), digital media (including CraveTV) and Internet
Internet
properties including Sympatico.ca. Bell Media
Bell Media
is the successor-in-interest to Baton Broadcasting
Baton Broadcasting
(later CTV Inc.), one of Canada's first private-sector television broadcasters
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Psychiatry
Psychiatry
Psychiatry
is the medical specialty devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, study, and treatment of mental disorders.[1][2] These include various maladaptations related to mood, behaviour, cognition, and perceptions. See glossary of psychiatry. Initial psychiatric assessment of a person typically begins with a case history and mental status examination. Physical examinations and psychological tests may be conducted. On occasion, neuroimaging or other neurophysiological techniques are used.[3] Mental disorders are often diagnosed in accordance with clinical concepts listed in diagnostic manuals such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), edited and used by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) and the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA)
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480i
480i
480i
is a shorthand name for the video mode used for standard-definition analog or digital television in Caribbean, Myanmar, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Laos, Western Sahara, and most of the Americas
Americas
(with the exception of Argentina, Paraguay
Paraguay
and Uruguay). The 480 identifies a vertical resolution of 480 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution. The field rate, which is 60 Hz (or 59.94 Hz when used with NTSC
NTSC
color), is sometimes included when identifying the video mode, i.e. 480i60; another notation, endorsed by both the International Telecommunication Union in BT.601
BT.601
and SMPTE in SMPTE 259M, includes the frame rate, as in 480i/30. The other common standard, used in the other parts of the world, is 576i. In analogue contexts, this resolution is often called "525 lines"
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Cardiologist
Cardiology
Cardiology
(from Greek καρδίᾱ kardiā, "heart" and -λογία -logia, "study") is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart as well as parts of the circulatory system. The field includes medical diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology. Physicians
Physicians
who specialize in this field of medicine are called cardiologists, a specialty of internal medicine
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Aspberger Syndrome
Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger's, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests.[1] As a milder autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it differs from other ASDs by relatively normal language and intelligence.[4] Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and unusual use of language are common.[5][6] Signs usually begin before two years old and typically last for a person's entire life.[1] The exact cause of Asperger's is unknown.[1] While it is probably partly inherited, the underlying genetics have not been determined conclusively.[5][7] Environmental factors are also believed to play a role.[1] Brain imaging has not identified a common underlying problem.[5] The diagnosis of Asperger's was removed in the 2013 fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), and people with these sy
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