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A View From The Bridge
A View from the Bridge is a play by American playwright Arthur Miller. It was first staged on September 29, 1955, as a one-act verse drama with A Memory of Two Mondays at the Coronet Theatre on Broadway. The run was unsuccessful, and Miller subsequently revised the play to contain two acts; this version is the one with which audiences are most familiar.[1] The two-act version premiered in the New Watergate theatre club in London's West End under the direction of Peter Brook on October 11, 1956. The play is set in 1950s America, in an Italian-American neighborhood near the Brooklyn Bridge in New York.[2] It employs a chorus and narrator in the character of Alfieri. Eddie, the tragic protagonist, has an improper love of, and almost obsession with, Catherine, his wife Beatrice's orphaned niece, so he does not approve of her courtship of Beatrice's cousin Rodolfo
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Scott Ellis
Scott Ellis (born April 19, 1957) is an American stage director, actor, and television director. Ellis graduated from Goodman School of Drama at the Art Institute of Chicago (now at DePaul University) in Chicago.[1] He also graduated from James W. Robinson Secondary School, Fairfax, VA, in 1975. He studied acting at HB Studio[2] in New York City. Ellis has a twin brother named Mark Ellis, who is the Executive Director of the International Bar Association. Before he became a director, Ellis was a successful stage actor; he performed on Broadway in the original casts of the 1980 original musical Musical Chairs and The Rink with Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera.[3][4] He has directed numerous Off-Broadway and Broadway productions, as well as the New York City Opera Company revivals at the New York State Theater: A Little Night Music (1990) and 110 in the Shade (1992)
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Imperial Theatre
The Imperial Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 249 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in Midtown Manhattan. The theatre seats up to 1417 people. The Shubert Organization's fiftieth venue in New York City, it was constructed to replace their outdated Lyric Theatre. Designed by Herbert J. Krapp specifically to accommodate musical theatre productions, it opened on December 25, 1923 with the Oscar Hammerstein II-Vincent Youmans production Mary Jane McKane. Since then, it has hosted numerous important musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun (1946), Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Dreamgirls (1981), The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1985) and Les Misérables (1990), which played at the theatre until 2003
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Cort Theatre
Coordinates: 40°45′33″N 73°58′59″W / 40.759210°N 73.983°W / 40.759210; -73.983 The Cort Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 138 West 48th Street in the Theater District of midtown Manhattan in New York City. It is owned by the Shubert Organization, the largest owner of Broadway theatres. The Cort Theatre was designated a New York City landmark on November 17, 1987.[1] John Cort (ca. 1861-1929), founder of the Northwestern Theatrical Association,[2] commissioned architect Thomas W. Lamb to design the theater. Its façade was modeled on the Petit Trianon in Versailles. The resulting 1082-seat Cort Theater is one of the few Lamb theaters still extant and functioning as a legitimate theater
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Broadway Theatre

Broadway theatre,[nb 1] also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[1][2] Broadway and London's West End together represent the highest commercial level of live theater in the English-speaking world.[3] While the thoroughfare itself is eponymous with the district and its collection of 41 theaters, and is closely identified with Times Square, only three of the theaters are located on Broadway itself (being the Broadway Theatre, the Palace Theatre, and the Winter Garden Theatre)
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American Airlines Theatre
The American Airlines Theatre, originally the Selwyn Theatre, is a historic Italian Renaissance style Broadway theatre in New York City built in 1918. It was designed by George Keister and built by the Selwyn brothers. Used for musicals and other dramatic performances it was eventually converted for film. It was used briefly as a visitor's center but stood vacant for years until a 1997 renovation and restoration. It is located at 227 West 42nd Street. Originally named the Selwyn Theatre, it was designed by the architect George Keister and constructed by the Selwyn brothers, Edgar and Archie, in 1918.[2] It was one of three theatres they built and controlled on 42nd Street, along with the Apollo and the Times Square Theater. It was decorated in the style of the Italian Renaissance, and originally had 1,180 seats.[3] At the time of its opening, the design had several innovations
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Broadway Theatre (53rd Street)
The Broadway Theatre (formerly Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre, and Ciné Roma) is a Broadway theatre located in midtown Manhattan. It has a large seating capacity of 1,761, and unlike most Broadway theaters, it is actually located on Broadway, at number 1681. Designed by architect Eugene De Rosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day, 1924, as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. The theater has operated under many names and owners. It was renamed Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate theater house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930
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Moss Hart
Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and theatre director. Hart was born in New York City, the son of Lillian (Solomon) and Barnett Hart, a cigar maker.[1][2] He had a younger brother, Bernard.[3] He grew up in relative poverty with his English-born Jewish immigrant parents in the Bronx and in Sea Gate, Brooklyn.[4] He was the great-grandson of the Jewish bare-knuckle pugilist Barney Aaron. Early on he had a strong relationship with his Aunt Kate, with whom he later lost contact due to a falling out between her and his parents, and Kate's weakening mental state. She piqued his interest in the theater and took him to see performances often. Hart even went so far as to create an "alternate ending" to her life in his book Act One
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Vivian Beaumont Theater

The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a Broadway theater located in the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts complex at 150 West 65th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It is New York City's only Broadway-class theater (thus making its productions eligible for the Tony Awards) that is not located inThe Vivian Beaumont Theater is a Broadway theater located in the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts complex at 150 West 65th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It is New York City's only Broadway-class theater (thus making its productions eligible for the Tony Awards) that is not located in the Theater District near Times Square. The building was one of the last structures designed by Eero Saarinen, a Finnish-born mid-century architect
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Shubert Theatre (New York City)

The Shubert Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in Midtown Manhattan.

Designed by architect Henry Beaumont Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the second oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. The two theatres are connected by a private road/sidewalk, "Shubert Alley"
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