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Sanhaja De Srair Language
Senhaja de Srair ("Senhaja of Srair") is a Northern Berber language. It is spoken by the Sanhaja
Sanhaja
Berbers
Berbers
inhabiting the southern part of the Moroccan Rif. Despite its speech area, the Sanhaja
Sanhaja
language belongs to the Atlas branch of Berber.[2] It has also been influenced by the neighbouring Riffian language. References[edit]^ Sanhaja
Sanhaja
de Srair at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ a b Lameen Souag, 2004: "Senhaja de Srair is not Zenati, but rather Atlas, belonging (despite location) with Middle Atlas Tamazight." ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Senhaja De Srair". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
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Historical Language
Historical languages (also known as historic languages) are languages that were spoken in a historical period, but that are distinct from their modern form; that is, they are forms of languages historically attested to from the past which have evolved into more modern forms. Thus, historical languages contrast with dead languages (languages which have become extinct, or undergone language death). Also, historical languages contrast with reconstructed languages (that is, the proto-languages) of theoretical linguistics
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization
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Sanhaja
The Sanhaja
Sanhaja
(Berber languages: Aẓnag, pl. Iẓnagen, and also Aẓnaj, pl. Iẓnajen; Arabic: صنهاجة‎, Ṣanhaja) were once one of the largest Berber tribal confederations, along with the Iznaten and Imesmuden confederations.[1] Many tribes in Morocco and Mauritania bore and still carry this ethnonym, especially in its Berber form. Other names for the population include Zenaga, Sanhája, Znaga, Sanhâdja and Senhaja.Contents1 History 2 Present day 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit]Dance group of Sanhaja
Sanhaja
from the western Sahara at the National Folklore Festival at MarrakechAfter the arrival of Islam, the Sanhâdja spread out to the borders of the Sudan as far as the Senegal River and the Niger
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
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Afroasiatic Languages
Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic)[3] or Semito-Hamitic,[4] is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.[5] It includes languages spoken predominantly in West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
and parts of the Sahel. Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages
have over 495 million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).[6] The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic
Omotic
and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language is Arabic. A language within the Semitic branch, it includes Modern Standard Arabic as well as spoken colloquial varieties
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Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
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Rif
The Rif
Rif
or Riff (Berber: ⴰⵔⵉⴼ Arif or ⴰⵔⵔⵉⴼ Arrif or ⵏⴽⵔ Nkor) is a mainly mountainous region of northern Morocco, as well as Ceuta
Ceuta
and Melilla, both in Spain. The
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Mzab–Wargla Languages
The Mzab–Wargla languages
Mzab–Wargla languages
or Northern Saharan oasis dialects are a dialect cluster of the Zenati languages, within the Northern Berber subbranch
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Gurara Language
Gurara (Gourara) is a Zenati Berber language
Berber language
spoken in the Gourara (Tigurarin) region, an archipelago of oases surrounding the town of Timimoun
Timimoun
in southwestern Algeria
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Mozabite Language
Mozabite, or Tunżabt, is a Berber dialect spoken by the Mozabites, an Ibadi
Ibadi
Berber group inhabiting the seven cities of the M'zab
M'zab
natural region in the northern Saharan Algeria. It is also spoken by small numbers of Mozabite emigrants in other local cities and elsewhere. Mozabite is one of the Mzab–Wargla languages, a dialect cluster of the Zenati languages. It is very closely related to the nearby Berber dialects of Ouargla
Ouargla
and Oued Righ as well as the more distant Gourara. Bibliography[edit]ابراهيم و بكير عبد السلام. الوجيز في قواعد الكتابة و النحو للغة الأمازيغية "المزابية". المطبعة العرببة: غرداية 1996. Delheure, Jean. Aǧraw n Yiwalen Tumẓabt d-Tefṛansist = Dictionnaire Mozabite–Francais
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Tidikelt Language
Tidikelt (also known as Tidikelt Tamazight, Tamazight or Tidikelt Berber) is a Zenati Berber language
Berber language
spoken in Algeria. It is one of the Mzab–Wargla languages. Tidikelt is spoken in the northwest of Tamanrasset Province, including in In Salah District.[3] Tidikelt Tamazight has two dialects; Tidikelt and Tit. Tidikelt Tamazight is considered to be an endangered language, nearly extinct, with only 1,000 speakers of the language and decreasing.Contents1 Classification 2 History 3 Geographic distribution3.1 Status4 ReferencesClassification[edit] Tidikelt Tamazight is part of the Berber branch of the Afroasiatic family. History[edit] The northern region of Africa was, at one point in history, was primarily inhabited by Berbers. The name Berber comes from Barbari, which was used by the Romans. Barbari is a Latin
Latin
word meaning Barbarians
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Tuwat Language
Tuwat (Touat, Tuat) is a Zenati Berber language. It is spoken by Zenata
Zenata
Berbers
Berbers
in a number of villages in the Tuat
Tuat
region of southern Algeria; notably Tamentit
Tamentit
(where it was already practically extinct by 1985[3]) and Tittaf, located south of the Gurara Berber speech area. Ethnologue
Ethnologue
considers them a single language, "Zenati", but Blench (2006) classifies Gurara as a dialect of Mzab–Wargla and Tuwat as a dialect of the Riff cluster. References[edit]^ Tuwat at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(17th ed., 2013) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Touat". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
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