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Samul Nori
Samul nori
Samul nori
is a genre of percussion music originating in Korea. The word samul means "four objects" and nori means "play"; Samul nori
Samul nori
is performed with four traditional Korean musical instruments: Kkwaenggwari
Kkwaenggwari
(a small gong) Jing (a larger gong) Janggu
Janggu
(an hourglass-shaped drum) Buk (drum)
Buk (drum)
(a barrel drum similar to the bass drum)The traditional Korean instruments are called pungmul. Samul nori
Samul nori
has its roots in Pungmul
Pungmul
nori (literally "Korean traditional percussion instruments playing"), a Korean folk genre comprising music, acrobatics, folk dance, and rituals, which was traditionally performed in rice farming villages in order to ensure and to celebrate good harvests
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Park Chung Hee
Park Chung-hee
Park Chung-hee
(Korean pronunciation: [pak̚.t͈ɕʌŋ.ɦi] or [pak̚] [tɕʌŋ.ɦi]; 14 November 1917 – 26 October 1979) was a South Korean politician, general, and dictator who served as the President of South Korea
President of South Korea
from 1963 until his assassination in 1979, assuming that office after first ruling the country as head of a military junta installed by the May 16 coup
May 16 coup
in 1961. Before his presidency, he was the chairman of the Supreme Council for National Reconstruction from 1961 to 1963 after a career as a military leader in the South Korean Army. Park's coup brought an end to the interim government of the Second Republic and his election and inauguration in 1963 ushered in the Third Republic
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President Of South Korea
The President
President
of the Republic of Korea
Korea
(Hangul: 대한민국 대통령; Hanja: 大韓民國 大統領; RR: Daehan Minguk Daetongryeong) is, according to the South Korean constitution, the chairperson of the cabinet, the chief executive of the government, commander-in-chief of the armed forces, and the head of state of South Korea. The Constitution and the amended Presidential Election Act of 1987 provide for election of the president by direct, secret ballot, ending sixteen years of indirect presidential elections under the preceding two governments. The president is directly elected to a five-year term, with no possibility of re-election.[1] If a presidential vacancy should occur, a successor must be elected within sixty days, during which time presidential duties are to be performed by the prime minister or other senior cabinet members in the order of priority as determined by law
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Kodo (taiko Group)
Kodō (鼓童) is a professional taiko drumming troupe. Based on Sado Island, Japan, they have had a role in popularizing taiko drumming, both in Japan
Japan
and abroad. They regularly tour Japan, Europe, and the United States. In Japanese the word "Kodō" conveys two meanings: "heartbeat" the primal source of all rhythm and, read in a different way, the word can mean "children of the drum". Although taiko are the primary instrument in their performances, other traditional Japanese musical instruments such as fue and shamisen make an appearance on stage as do traditional dance and vocal performance. Kodō's repertoire includes pieces based on the traditional rhythms of regional Japan, pieces composed for Kodō by contemporary songwriters, and pieces written by Kodō members themselves
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Taiko
Taiko
Taiko
(太鼓) are a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments. In Japanese, the term refers to any kind of drum, but outside Japan, it is used to refer to any of the various Japanese drums called wadaiko (和太鼓, "Japanese drums") and to the form of ensemble taiko drumming more specifically called kumi-daiko (組太鼓, "set of drums"). The process of constructing taiko varies between manufacturers, and preparation of both the drum body and skin can take several years depending on method. Taiko
Taiko
have a mythological origin in Japanese folklore, but historical records suggest that taiko were introduced to Japan
Japan
through Korean and Chinese cultural influence as early as the 6th century CE. Some taiko are similar to instruments originating from India. Archaeological evidence also supports the view that taiko were present in Japan during the 6th century in the Kofun period
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Sado, Niigata
Sado (佐渡市, Sado-shi) is a city located on Sado Island (佐渡ヶ島, Sadogashima) in Niigata Prefecture
Niigata Prefecture
in the Chūbu region of Japan. Since 2004, the city has comprised the entire island, although not all of its total area is urbanized. Sado is the sixth largest island of Japan
Japan
in area following the four main islands and Okinawa Island
Okinawa Island
(excluding the Northern Territories). As of April 1, 2011, the city has an estimated population of 63,231 and a population density of 73.93 persons per km2
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Korean Buddhism
Korean Buddhism
Buddhism
is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism
Buddhism
by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism. Early Korean monks believed that the traditions they received from foreign countries were internally inconsistent. To address this, they developed a new holistic approach to Buddhism. This approach is characteristic of virtually all major Korean thinkers, and has resulted in a distinct variation of Buddhism, which is called Tongbulgyo ("interpenetrated Buddhism"), a form that sought to harmonize all disputes (a principle called hwajaeng 和諍) by Korean scholars.[1] Korean Buddhist thinkers refined their predecessors' ideas into a distinct form. As it now stands, Korean Buddhism
Buddhism
consists mostly of the Seon lineage, primarily represented by the Jogye and Taego Orders
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Korean Shamanism
Korean shamanism, also known as Shinism ( Hangul
Hangul
신교, Hanja
Hanja
神敎; Shingyo or Shinkyo, "religion of the spirits/gods"),[1][2] or Shindo (Hangul: 신도; Hanja: 神道, "way of the spirits/gods"),[3][4][note 1] is the collective
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Animism
Animism
Animism
(from Latin
Latin
anima, "breath, spirit, life")[1][2] is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.[3][4][5][6] Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism
Animism
is used in the anthropology of religion as a term for the belief system of many indigenous peoples,[7] especially in contrast to the relatively more recent development of organised religions.[8] Although each culture has its own different mythologies and rituals, "animism" is said to describe the most common, foundational thread of indigenous peoples' "spiritual" or "supernatural" perspectives
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Honam
Honam
Honam
(Korean pronunciation: [ho.nam]; literally "south of the lake") is a region coinciding with the former Jeolla
Jeolla
Province in what is now South Korea
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Yeongnam
Yeongnam (Hangul: 영남, Korean pronunciation: [jʌŋ.nam]; literally "south of the passes") is the name of a region that coincides with the former Gyeongsang
Gyeongsang
Province in what is now South Korea. The region includes the modern-day provinces of North and South
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South Korea
Coordinates: 36°N 128°E / 36°N 128°E / 36; 128 Republic
Republic
of Korea 대한민국 Daehan MingukFlagEmblemMotto: "홍익인간 (弘益人間)" (Korean) (de facto) "Benefit broadly in the human world / Devotion to the Welfare of Humanity"[1]Anthem:  Aegukga
Aegukga
"애국가 (愛國歌)" (Korean) (de facto) "Patriotic Song"Government Emblem대한민국정부 상징문양 (Korean) Government Emblem of South KoreaArea controlled by South Korea
Korea
is shown in dark green; South Korean-claimed but uncontrolled regions shown in light green.Status Sovereign stateCapital and largest city Seoul 37°33′N 126°58′E / 37.550°N 126.967°E / 37.550; 126.967Official languages Korean Korean Sign Language[2]Official script HangulEthnic groups Predominately Korean
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