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Samsara
Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
(/səmˈsɑːrə/) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "wandering" or "world", with the connotation of cyclic, circuitous change.[1][2] It also refers to the theory of rebirth and "cyclicality of all life, matter, existence", a fundamental assumption of all Indian religions.[2][3] Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
is sometimes referred to with terms or phrases such as transmigration, karmic cycle, reincarnation, and "cycle of aimless drifting, wandering or mundane existence".[2][4] The concept of Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
has roots in the Vedic literature, but the theory is not discussed there
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Sansara (moth)
Sansara is a genus of moths in the Cossidae
Cossidae
family. Species[edit] Sansara dea (Yakovlev, 2006) Sansara hreblayi Yakovlev, 2004 Sansara naumanni Yakovlev, 2004 Sansara pallidalae (Hampson, 1892)References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sansara (moth). Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to Sansara (moth)Yakovlev, R.V., 2004: Cossidae
Cossidae
of Thailand. Part 2. (Lepidoptera: Cossidae). Atalanta 35 (3-4): 383-389. Yakovlev, R.V., 2009: New taxa of African and Asian Cossidae (Lepidoptera). Euroasian Entomological Journal 8 (3): 353-361
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Samhita
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma puranasBrahma Brahmānda Brahmavaivarta Markandeya BhavishyaVaishnava puranasVishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Vamana Kurma MatsyaShaiva puranasShiva Linga Skanda Vayu AgniItihasaRamayana MahabharataShastras and sutrasDharma Shastra Artha Śastra Kamasutra Brahma Sutras Samkhya Sutras Mimamsa Sutras Nyāya Sūtras Vaiśeṣika Sūtra Yoga Sutras
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Sat (Sanskrit)
Sat (Sanskrit: सत्) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word meaning "the true essence and that "which is unchangeable" of an entity, species or existence.[1] Sat is a common prefix in ancient Indian literature and variously implies that which is good, true, virtuous, being, happening, real, existing, enduring, lasting, essential.[2] In ancient texts, fusion words based on Sat, refer to "Universal Spirit, Universal Principle, Being, Soul of the World, Brahman".[3][4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Meaning2.1 Supreme consciousness3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] It can simply be said to be the present participle of the root as "to be"
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Raja
Raja
Raja
(/ˈrɑːdʒɑː/; also spelled rajah, from Sanskrit राजन् rājan-), is a title for a monarch or princely ruler in South and Southeast Asia
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Jnana
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinmayananda NisargadattaVishishtadvaitaNammalvar Alvars Yamunacharya Ramanuja Vedanta
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Ajivika
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita
Dvaita
Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinm
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Śūnyatā
Śūnyatā
Śūnyatā
(Sanskrit; Pali: suññatā), translated into English most often as emptiness[1] and sometimes voidness,[2] is a Buddhist concept which has multiple meanings depending on its doctrinal context. It is either an ontological feature of reality, a meditation state, or a phenomenological analysis of experience. In Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism, suññatā often refers to the not-self (Pāli: anattā, Sanskrit: anātman)[note 1] nature of the five aggregates of experience and the six sense spheres
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Soteriology
Soteriology
Soteriology
(/səˌtɪəriˈɒlədʒi/; Greek: σωτηρία sōtēria "salvation" from σωτήρ sōtēr "savior, preserver" and λόγος logos "study" or "word"[1]) is the study of religious doctrines of salvation. Salvation
Salvation
theory occupies a place of special significance in many religions. In the academic field of religious studies, soteriology is understood by scholars as representing a key theme in a number of different religions and is often studied in a comparative context; that is, comparing various ideas about what salvation is and how it is obtained.Contents1 Buddhism 2 Christianity 3 Hinduism 4 Islam 5 Jainism 6 Judaism 7 Mystery religions 8 Sikhism 9 Other religions 10 See also 11 References 12 Further readingBuddhism[edit] Main article: NirvanaThis section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Madhyamaka
Madhyamaka
Madhyamaka
(Sanskrit: Madhyamaka, Chinese: 中觀见; pinyin: Zhōngguān Jìan; also known as Śūnyavāda) refers primarily to the later schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
philosophy[1] founded by Nagarjuna
Nagarjuna
(150 CE to 250 CE). According to Madhyamaka
Madhyamaka
all phenomena (dharmas) are empty (śūnya) of "nature,"[2] a "substance" or "essence" (svabhāva) which gives them "solid and independent existence,"[3] because they are dependently co-arisen
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Rishi
Rishi
Rishi
(Sanskrit: ऋषि IAST: ṛṣi) is a Vedic term that denotes an inspired poet of hymns from the Vedas. Post-Vedic tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
regards the rishis as "seers", "great sadhu" or "sages" who after intense meditation (tapas) realized the supreme truth and eternal knowledge, which they composed into hymns.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 "Seer" of the Vedas 3 Rishi
Rishi
in Indonesia and Khmer temples 4 Ruesi in Cambodia, Thailand and Laos 5 Other uses 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The word Rishi
Rishi
(Great Yogi, Phra Ruesi, Lao: ພະລືສີ, Thai: พระฤาษี) may be derived from two different meanings of the root 'rsh'. Sanskrit
Sanskrit
grammarians[2] derive this word from the second meaning: "to go, to move".[3] V. S
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Yama
Yama
Yama
( listen (help·info)) or Yamarāja is a god of death, the south direction, and the underworld,[1] belonging to an early stratum of Rigvedic Hindu deities. In Sanskrit, his name can be interpreted to mean "twin".[2] In the Zend- Avesta
Avesta
of Zoroastrianism, he is called "Yima".[3] According to the Vishnu Purana, Yama
Yama
is the son of sun-god Surya[4] and Sandhya, the daughter of Vishvakarma. Yama
Yama
is the brother of Sraddhadeva Manu
Sraddhadeva Manu
and of his older sister Yami, which Horace Hayman Wilson indicates to mean the Yamuna.[5] According to the Vedas, Yama is said to have been the first mortal who died
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Adi Shankara
Shaivism/Tantra/NathKashmir Shaivism Pratyabhijna Nath Inchegeri SampradayaNew movementsNeo-Advaita NondualismConcepts Classical Advaita
Advaita
vedantaAtman Brahman Avidya Ajativada Mahāvākyas Om Tat Tvam Asi Three Bodies Aham Cause and effect KoshaKashmir ShaivismPratyabhijna so'hamPracticesGuru Meditation Svādhyāya Sravana, manana, nididhyasana Jnana yoga Rāja yoga "Unfoldment of the middle" Self-enquiryMokshaMoksha Anubhava Turiya SahajaTexts
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Thangka
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa
Kadampa
BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:<
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Jainism
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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