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Sambal Language
Sambal or Sambali is a Sambalic language spoken primarily in the Zambal municipalities of Santa Cruz, Candelaria, Masinloc, Palauig, and Iba, and in the Pangasinense municipality of Infanta in the Philippines; speakers can also be found in Panitian, Quezon, Palawan and Barangay Mandaragat or Buncag of Puerto Princesa.[citation needed] Sambal is also termed Tina in some references. However, the term is considered offensive to the language's speakers
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Nasal Stop
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive, nasal stop in contrast with a nasal fricative, or nasal continuant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. Examples of nasals in English are [n] and [m], in words such as nose and mouth. Nasal occlusives are nearly universal in human languages. There are also other kinds of nasal consonants in some languages.Contents1 Definition 2 Voiceless nasals 3 Other kinds of nasal consonant 4 Languages without nasals 5 Lack of phonemic nasals 6 Lack of phonetic nasals 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 BibliographyDefinition[edit] Nearly all nasal consonants are nasal occlusives, in which air escapes through the nose but not through the mouth, as it is blocked (occluded) by the lips or tongue. The oral cavity still acts as a resonance chamber for the sound
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Pejorative
A pejorative (also called a derogatory term,[1] a slur, a term of abuse, or a term of disparagement) is a word or grammatical form expressing a negative connotation or a low opinion of someone or something, showing a lack of respect for someone or something.[2] It is also used as criticism, hostility, disregard or disrespect. A term can be regarded as pejorative in some social or cultural groups but not in others. Sometimes, a term may begin as a pejorative and eventually be adopted in a non-pejorative sense (or vice versa) in some or all contexts. Name slurs can also involve an insulting or disparaging innuendo,[3] rather than being a direct pejorative
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Candelaria, Zambales
Candelaria, officially the Municipality of Candelaria, is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Zambales, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 27,174 people.[3] Candelaria is 42 kilometres (26 mi) from the capital town of Iba. It is nestled at the foot of the Zambales
Zambales
Mountains in the east and lies along coastline of the South China Sea
South China Sea
in the west, with a total land area of 33,359 hectares (82,430 acres), making it the third-largest town in terms of land area in Zambales. [2] This municipality is known for Uacon Lake, the cleanest lake in Central Luzon, and for its numerous beach resorts.Contents1 History 2 Barangays 3 Demographics 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] During the pre-Spanish era, the area of Candelaria was unsettled forest
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Masinloc
Masinloc, officially the Municipality of Masinloc, is a 1st class municipality in the province of Zambales, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 47,719 people.[3] The disputed Scarborough Shoal
Scarborough Shoal
(under the names Pulo ng Panatag and Bajo de Masinlóc) is claimed by the Philippine government as within the town's territorial jurisdiction
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Bilabial Consonant
In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips.Contents1 Transcription 2 See also 3 References3.1 Notes 3.2 General referencesTranscription[edit] The bilabial consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are:IPA Description ExampleLanguage Orthography IPA Meaningbilabial nasal English man [mæn]voiceless bilabial stop English spin [spɪn]voiced bilabial stop English bed [bɛd]voiceless bilabial fricative Japanese 富士山 (fujisan) [ɸuʑisaɴ] Mount Fujivoiced bilabial fricative Ewe ɛʋɛ [ɛ̀βɛ̀] Ewebilabial approximant Spanish lobo [loβ̞o] wolfbilabial trill Nias simbi [siʙi] lower jawbilabial ejective Adyghe пӀэ [pʼa] meatʘ̬ ʘ̃ ʘ̥̃ʰ ʘ̃ˀ bilabial click release (many distinct consonants) Nǁng ʘoe [ʘoe] meatOwere Igbo has a six-way contrast among bilabial stops: [p pʰ ɓ̥ b b̤ ɓ]
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Iba, Zambales
Iba, officially the Municipality of Iba, is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Zambales, Philippines
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Pangasinan
Pangasinan
Pangasinan
(Pangasinan: Luyag na Panggasinan; Filipino: Lalawigan ng Pangasinan) is a province in the Philippines. Its provincial capital is Lingayen. Pangasinan
Pangasinan
is on the western area of the island of Luzon along the Lingayen
Lingayen
Gulf and West Philippine Sea. It has a total land area of 5,451.01 square kilometres (2,104.65 sq mi).[2] According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 2,956,726 people.[3] The official number of registered voters in Pangasinan
Pangasinan
is 1,651,814.[4] The western portion of the province is part of the homeland of the Sambal people, while the central and eastern portions are the homeland of the Pangasinan
Pangasinan
people
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Panitian
Panitian is a barangay in the municipality of Quezon of the province of Palawan, established through Republic Act (R.A.) No. 2593 enacted on June 21, 1959.[1] Panitian was originally a sitio in Quezon, Palawan
Palawan
established by Zambal migrants coming from the northern municipalities of Zambales
Zambales
in 1956 through the National Resettlement and Rehabilitation Administration (NARRA) or Republic Act 1160 of President Ramon Magsaysay
Ramon Magsaysay
in 1954. The enactment of R.A. 2593 made Panitian the largest barangay of Quezon, Palawan
Quezon, Palawan
with the inclusion of other sitios under its jurisdiction such as Odiong, Malatgao, Tagpisa, Candis and Napwaran. Due to its enormous size, Panitian allowed Sitio
Sitio
Malatgao to separate and form another barangay before the Philippine barangay elections of 1982. Panitian is bordered on the west by Bgy
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Puerto Princesa City
Puerto Princesa, officially the City of Puerto Princesa, (Cuyonon: Siyudad i'ang Puerto Princesa; Hiligaynon: Dakbanwa sang Puerto Princesa; Filipino: Lungsod ng Puerto Princesa; Spanish: Ciudad de Puerto Princesa), and often referred to as Puerto Princesa
Puerto Princesa
City, is a 1st class Highly Urbanized City in the Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 255,116 people.[4] It is a city located in the western province of Palawan, and westernmost city in the Philippines. Though the seat of government and capital for the province, the city itself is one of 38 independent cities within the Philippines
Philippines
not controlled by the province in which it is geographically located and is therefore an independent area located within Palawan. It the least densely populated city in the Philippines
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Summer Institute Of Linguistics
SIL International
SIL International
(formerly known as the Summer Institute of Linguistics) is a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian
Christian
non-profit organization, whose main purpose is to study, develop and document languages, especially those that are lesser-known, in order to expand linguistic knowledge, promote literacy, translate the Christian
Christian
Bible into local languages, and aid minority language development. The organization was founded by Presbyterian minister William Cameron Townsend, an American missionary to Guatemala, where he worked among the Kaqchikel Maya people. In 1933 Townsend turned to Mexico
Mexico
with the purpose of translating the Bible
Bible
into indigenous languages there, as he had done for Kaqchikel
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Municipalities Of The Philippines
SenateSenate President Aquilino Pimentel IIIHouse of RepresentativesSpeaker Pantaleon AlvarezDistricts Party-list representationLocal legislaturesARMM Regional Legislative Assembly Provinces Cities Municipalities BarangaysExecutivePresident of the PhilippinesRodrigo DuterteVice President of the PhilippinesLeni RobredoCabinet Executive departments Local governmentJudiciarySupreme CourtChief Justice Maria Lourdes SerenoCourt of Appeals Court of Tax Appeals Sandiganbayan Ombudsman Regional Trial Courts Barangay
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Velar Nasal
The velar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. It is the sound of ng in English sing. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
that represents this sound is ⟨ŋ⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA
X-SAMPA
symbol is N. The IPA
IPA
symbol ⟨ŋ⟩ is similar to ⟨ɳ⟩, the symbol for the retroflex nasal, which has a rightward-pointing hook extending from the bottom of the right stem, and to ⟨ɲ⟩, the symbol for the palatal nasal, which has a leftward-pointing hook extending from the bottom of the left stem. Both the IPA
IPA
symbol and the sound are commonly called 'eng' or 'engma'. As a phoneme, the velar nasal does not occur in many of the indigenous languages of the Americas or in a large number of European or Middle Eastern or Caucasian languages, but it is extremely common in Australian Aboriginal languages
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Phoneme
A phoneme (/ˈfoʊniːm/) is one of the units of sound (or gesture in the case of sign languages, see chereme) that distinguish one word from another in a particular language. For example, in most dialects of English, the sound patterns /θʌm/ (thumb) and /dʌm/ (dumb) are two separate words distinguished by the substitution of one phoneme, /θ/, for another phoneme, /d/. (Two words like this that differ in meaning through a contrast of a single phoneme form what is called a minimal pair). In many other languages these would be interpreted as exactly the same set of phonemes (i.e. /θ/ and /d/ would be considered the same). In linguistics, phonemes (usually established by the use of minimal pairs, such as kill vs kiss or pat vs bat) are written between slashes, e.g. /p/
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Consonant
In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract. Examples are [p], pronounced with the lips; [t], pronounced with the front of the tongue; [k], pronounced with the back of the tongue; [h], pronounced in the throat; [f] and [s], pronounced by forcing air through a narrow channel (fricatives); and [m] and [n], which have air flowing through the nose (nasals)
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Vowel
Paired vowels are: unrounded • roundedManners of articulationObstruent    Stop     Affricate     Fricative        Strident            SibilantSonorant    Nasal     Approximant        Semivowel    Vowel     Vibrant        Flap/Tap         TrillLiquid    Rhotic     LateralOcclusive ContinuantAirstreamsEgressive Ingressive Ejective Implosive Nonexplosive Lingual (clicks) Linguo-pulmonic Linguo-ejective PercussiveSee alsoArticulatory phonetics Aspirated consonant No au
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