HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sako TRG
The Sako TRG
Sako TRG
is a bolt-action sniper rifle line designed and manufactured by the Finnish firearms manufacturer, SAKO
SAKO
of Riihimäki. The TRG-21 and TRG-22 are designed to fire standard .308 Winchester[1] / 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
sized cartridges, while the TRG-41 and TRG-42 are designed to fire more powerful and dimensionally larger .300 Winchester Magnum (7.62×67mm) magnum and .338 Lapua
.338 Lapua
Magnum (8.6×70mm) super magnum cartridges. They are available with olive drab green, desert tan/coyote brown, dark earth or black stocks, and are also available with a folding stock.[2] The sniper rifles are normally fitted with muzzle brakes to reduce recoil, jump and flash. The Sako factory TRG muzzle brakes vent sideways and are detachable
[...More...]

"Sako TRG" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sniper Rifle
A sniper rifle is a high-precision rifle designed for sniper missions. It serves to fulfil the tactical need for long range surveillance, effective anti-personnel and anti-materiel operations with high hit efficiency, and can be used by both military and law enforcement. The modern sniper rifle is a portable shoulder-fired weapon system with a choice between bolt-action or semi-automatic action, fitted with a telescopic sight for extreme accuracy and chambered for a high-performance military centerfire cartridge.Contents1 History 2 Classification2.1 Military 2.2 Law enforcement3 Distinguishing characteristics3.1 Telescopic sight 3.2 Action 3.3 Magazine 3.4 Barrel 3.5 Stock 3.6 Accessories4 Capabilities4.1 Accuracy 4.2 Maximum effective range5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]The British Whitworth rifle, used extensively during the American Civil War
[...More...]

"Sniper Rifle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iron Sights
Iron sights
Iron sights
are a system of shaped alignment markers (usually metal) used as a sighting device to assist in the aiming of a device such as a firearm, crossbow, or telescope, and exclude the use of optics as in reflector (reflex) sights, holographic sights, and telescopic sights.[1] Iron sights
Iron sights
are typically composed of two component sights, formed by metal blades: a rear sight mounted perpendicular to the line of sight and a front sight that is a post, bead, or ring. Open sights use a notch of some sort as the rear sight, while aperture sights use some form of a circular hole. Civilian, hunting, and police firearms usually feature open sights, while many military battle rifles employ aperture sights. The earliest and simplest iron sights are fixed and cannot be easily adjusted
[...More...]

"Iron Sights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sniper
A sniper is a military/paramilitary marksman who operates to maintain effective visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or at distances exceeding their detection capabilities.[1] Snipers generally have specialized training and are equipped with high-precision rifles and high-magnification optics, and often feed information back to their units or command headquarters. In addition to marksmanship and long range shooting, military snipers are trained in a variety of tactical techniques: detection, stalking, and target range estimation methods, camouflage, field craft, infiltration, special reconnaissance and observation, surveillance and target acquisition.Contents1 Etymology 2 Modern warfare2.1 Military
[...More...]

"Sniper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Symmetry
Symmetry
Symmetry
(from Greek συμμετρία symmetria "agreement in dimensions, due proportion, arrangement")[1] in everyday language refers to a sense of harmonious and beautiful proportion and balance.[2][3][a] In mathematics, "symmetry" has a more precise definition, that an object is invariant to any of various transformations; including reflection, rotation or scaling
[...More...]

"Symmetry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

M-LOK
M-LOK, standing for Modular Lock, is a free licensed[1] firearm rail interface system patented by Magpul Industries, developed by the Magpul design team consisting Michael T. Mayberry, William Bradley Bennett, Timothy Eric Roberts, Duane Liptak and Brian L
[...More...]

"M-LOK" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rail Integration System
. Rail Interface System (RIS, sometimes also referred to as Rail Accessory System, RAS) is a generic term for a system for attaching accessories to small firearms such as pistols, rifles and light machine guns. Common accessories include tactical lights, laser aiming modules, forward hand grips for improving weapon handling, telescopic sights for medium-ranged or distant targets, and reflex sights/red-dot sights for short to medium-ranged targets, iron sight lines, bipods, and bayonets. Most RIS equipment is compatible with one or more of the most common rail systems, all of which are broadly similar: Dovetail rail
Dovetail rail
Earlier system,
[...More...]

"Rail Integration System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peep Sight
Iron sights
Iron sights
are a system of shaped alignment markers (usually metal) used as a sighting device to assist in the aiming of a device such as a firearm, crossbow, or telescope, and exclude the use of optics as in reflector (reflex) sights, holographic sights, and telescopic sights.[1] Iron sights
Iron sights
are typically composed of two component sights, formed by metal blades: a rear sight mounted perpendicular to the line of sight and a front sight that is a post, bead, or ring. Open sights use a notch of some sort as the rear sight, while aperture sights use some form of a circular hole. Civilian, hunting, and police firearms usually feature open sights, while many military battle rifles employ aperture sights. The earliest and simplest iron sights are fixed and cannot be easily adjusted
[...More...]

"Peep Sight" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minute Of Arc
A minute of arc, arcminute (arcmin), arc minute, or minute arc is a unit of angular measurement equal to 1/60 of one degree. Since one degree is 1/360 of a turn (or complete rotation), one minute of arc is 1/7004216000000000000♠21600 of a turn. A minute of arc is π/7004108000000000000♠10800 of a radian. A second of arc, arcsecond (arcsec), or arc second is 1/60 of an arcminute, 1/7003360000000000000♠3600 of a degree, 1/7006129600000000000♠1296000 of a turn, and π/7005648000000000000♠648000 (about 1/7005206265000000000♠206265) of a radian
[...More...]

"Minute Of Arc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Accurize
Accurizing
Accurizing
is the process of improving the accuracy and precision of a gun (firearm or airgun).[1] For firearms, accuracy is the ability to hit exactly what one is aiming at, and precision is the ability to hit the same place over and over again in a repeatable fashion. Both are the goals of accurizing,[2] which generally concentrates on four different areas:Usability: Enhancements that give the shooter a firmer and more consistent hold on the firearm, as well as a more consistent trigger pull. Better design ergonomics is often employed, such as adjustable buttstocks and grips with more vertical angles that are natural to the human hand and wrist (e.g. pistol grip)
[...More...]

"Accurize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parkerizing
Parkerizing, bonderizing, phosphating, or phosphatizing is a method of protecting a steel surface from corrosion and increasing its resistance to wear through the application of a chemical phosphate conversion coating. Parkerizing
Parkerizing
is usually considered to be an improved zinc or manganese phosphating process, and not to be an improved iron phosphating process, although some use the term parkerizing as a generic term for applying phosphating (or phosphatizing) coatings that does include the iron phosphating process. Parkerizing
Parkerizing
is commonly used on firearms as a more effective alternative to bluing, which is an earlier-developed chemical conversion coating. It is also used extensively on automobiles to protect unfinished metal parts from corrosion. The Parkerizing
Parkerizing
process cannot be used on non-ferrous metals such as aluminium, brass, or copper
[...More...]

"Parkerizing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Receiver (firearms)
In firearms terminology, the firearm receiver or firearm frame is the part of a firearm which provides housing for internal components such as the hammer, bolt or breechblock, action and firing mechanism, and is usually threaded at its forward portion to "receive" the barrel and has screw holes on the bottom and/or rear to receive the stock and grip.[1] The receiver is often made of forged, machined, or stamped steel or aluminium; in addition to these traditional materials, modern science and engineering have introduced polymers and sintered metal powders to receiver construction.[2]Contents1 In US law1.1 Unfinished receivers2 Notable receivers 3 ReferencesIn US law[edit] AR-15
AR-15
rifles showing their configurations with different upper receivers (stripped-down lower receiver is visible at bottom)For the purposes of United States law, the receiver or frame is legally the firearm,[3] and as such it is the controlled part
[...More...]

"Receiver (firearms)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rifle Bedding
Rifle
Rifle
bedding is a process of providing a rigid and consistent foundation for a rifle’s operational components, by creating a stable and close-fitting bearing surface between the gun’s functional parts (i.e. the receiver housing the barrelled action) and its support part (i.e. the stock) that do not deform with pressure or shift under the shear stress of the recoil from firing. This is for the goal of accurizing the rifle and (to a lesser extent) prolonging the life of the stock. The bedding process is often an aftermarket improvement and involves molding an epoxy-based material onto the stock recess to fill away the gaps within its contact surface with the receiver (known as glass bedding), and/or inserting a metal cylinder around the action screws to reduce compressive shifting (known as pillar bedding)
[...More...]

"Rifle Bedding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

War In Afghanistan (2001–present)
ISAF phase (2001–14): Islamic Republic of Afghanistan[7] ISAF  United States  United Kingdom  Italy  Germany  Georgia  Jordan  Turkey  Bulgaria  Poland  Romania  Spain  Australia  Czech RepublicContinued list[a] Macedonia  Denmark  Armenia  Azerbaijan  Finland  France  Croatia  Hungary  Norway  Lithuania  Mongolia  United Arab Emirates  Belgium  Portugal  Slovakia  Netherlands  Montenegro  Latvia  Sweden  Albania  Ukraine  Bosnia and Herzegovina  Greece  Ireland  Iceland  Estonia  Malaysia  Slovenia  Austria  Bahrain  El Salvador  Luxembourg  New Zealand  South Korea  Tonga Canada  Pakistan[8]  
[...More...]

"War In Afghanistan (2001–present)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Free-floating Barrel
A free-floating barrel is a specific design technology used in highly accurate rifles, particularly match grade rifles, to increase the accuracy of the weapon. With conventional rifles, the barrel rests in contact with the fore-end of the stock. If the stock is manufactured from wood, environmental conditions or operational use may warp the wood, which may cause the barrel to shift its alignment slightly over time as well, altering the projectile's external ballistics and point of impact. Contact between the barrel and the stock also interferes with the natural frequency of the barrel, which can have a detrimental effect on accuracy especially when the barrel gets hot with repeated firing. The interference of the stock with the barrel's oscillation harmonics as the bullet passes down the bore can cause the barrel to vibrate inconsistently from shot to shot, depending on the external forces acting upon the stock at the time of the shot
[...More...]

"Free-floating Barrel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chrome Moly
41xx steel is a family of SAE steel grades, as specified by the Society of Automotive Engineers
Society of Automotive Engineers
(SAE). Alloying elements include chromium and molybdenum, and as a result these materials are often informally referred to as chromoly steel (common variant stylings include chrome-moly, cro-moly, CrMo, CRMO, CR-MOLY, and similar). They have an excellent strength to weight ratio and are considerably stronger and harder than standard 1020 steel, but are not easily welded (requiring thermal treatment both before and after welding to avoid cold cracking).[1] While these grades of steel do contain chromium, it is not in great enough quantities to provide the corrosion resistance found in stainless steel. Examples of applications for 4130, 4140 and 4145 include structural tubing, bicycle frames, tubes for transportation of pressurized gases, firearm parts, clutch and flywheel components, and roll cages
[...More...]

"Chrome Moly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.