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Saint Mary Of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church
Saint Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church, is located at 938 Genesee Street, Buffalo, New York
Buffalo, New York
in the cities east side. The building is a City of Buffalo landmark and former Catholic parish church within the Diocese of Buffalo.[2]Contents1 History 2 Current Use 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Construction of the church began in 1886 and was completed in 1891.[3] The church was built for a primarily German congregation in a rhenish romanesque revival style with the floor plan laid out as a Latin cross. The church's main tower rises 235 ft (71.63 meters) high.[4] In 1985, the church was shuttered and the Catholic Diocese considered demolishing it. Current Use[edit] The building underwent renovations from 1986–1996 which included a new roof, repairs to bell tower, façade cleaning, and life safety systems.[2] The building is now known as the King Urban Life Center and contains the King Center Charter School
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Groundbreaking
Groundbreaking, also known as cutting, sod-cutting, turning the first sod or a sod-turning ceremony, is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project. Such ceremonies are often attended by dignitaries such as politicians and businessmen. The actual shovel used during the groundbreaking is often a special ceremonial shovel, usually colored gold, meant to be saved for subsequent display and may be engraved.[1][2]Contents1 Other uses 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOther uses[edit] The term groundbreaking, when used as an adjective, may mean being or making something that has never been done, seen, or made before; "stylistically innovative works". See also[edit]Look up groundbreaking in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Builders' rites Topping out Cornerstone Publicity stunt Ribbon cutting ceremonyReferences[edit]^ jwise@dothaneagle.com, Jeremy Wise
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Buffalo, New York
Buffalo is the second largest city in the state of New York and the 81st-most populous city in the United States. As of July 2016[update], the population was 256,902, a slight decrease from the 2010 census. It is the principal municipality of the Buffalo–Niagara Falls metropolitan area, a region with 1,134,210 residents in the MSA and 1,213,668 in the CSA. The city serves as the county seat of Erie County. The city is also a major gateway for commerce and travel for the Canada–United States border, forming part of the bi-national Buffalo Niagara Region. The Buffalo area was inhabited before the 17th century by the Native American Iroquois
Iroquois
tribe and later by French settlers. The city grew significantly in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of immigration, the construction of the Erie Canal, the construction of rail transportation, and its close proximity to Lake Erie
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Altar
An altar is any structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are made for religious purposes, and by extension the 'Holy table' of post-reformation Anglican
Anglican
churches. Altars are usually found at shrines, and they can be located in temples, churches and other places of worship. Today they are used particularly in Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Shinto, Taoism. Also seen in Neopaganism
Neopaganism
and Ceremonial Magic. Judaism
Judaism
used such a structure until the destruction of the Second Temple
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Chancel
In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the presbytery), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building.[1] It may terminate in an apse. It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave. Direct access may be provided by a priest's door, usually on the south side of the church.[2] This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture.[3] In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area
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Parish (Catholic Church)
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


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Building Material
Building
Building
material is any material which is used for construction purposes. Many naturally occurring substances, such as clay, rocks, sand, and wood, even twigs and leaves, have been used to construct buildings. Apart from naturally occurring materials, many man-made products are in use, some more and some less synthetic. The manufacturing of building materials is an established industry in many countries and the use of these materials is typically segmented into specific specialty trades, such as carpentry, insulation, plumbing, and roofing work
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East Side, Buffalo, New York
The East Side is a large district of Buffalo. The East Side is bordered by Main Street to the north and west, I-190 and the Kaisertown neighborhood to the south, and the town of Cheektowaga
Cheektowaga
to the east. It is the physically largest neighborhood in Buffalo. It is characterized by many large, ornate 19th-century churches, most of them Roman Catholic; and modest ​1 1⁄2-story wood-frame cottages, many with progressively smaller rear additions that give the houses a telescoping effect. The East Side was once the second largest Polish-American community in the United States
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Sacred Architecture
Sacred architecture
Sacred architecture
(also known as religious architecture) is a religious architectural practice concerned with the design and construction of places of worship or sacred or intentional space, such as churches, mosques, stupas, synagogues, and temples. Many cultures devoted considerable resources to their sacred architecture and places of worship. Religious and sacred spaces are amongst the most impressive and permanent monolithic buildings created by humanity. Conversely, sacred architecture as a locale for meta-intimacy may also be non-monolithic, ephemeral and intensely private, personal and non-public. Sacred, religious and holy structures often evolved over centuries and were the largest buildings in the world, prior to the modern skyscraper. While the various styles employed in sacred architecture sometimes reflected trends in other structures, these styles also remained unique from the contemporary architecture used in other structures
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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Charter School
A charter school is a school that receives government funding but operates independently of the established state school system in which it is located.[1][2] Charter schools are an example of public asset privatization. There is ongoing debate on whether charter schools should be described as private schools or state schools.[3] Advocates of the charter model state that they are public schools because they are open to all students and do not charge tuition, while critics cite charter schools' private operation and looser regulations regarding public accountability and labor issues as arguments against.[3]Contents1 By country1.1 Australia 1.2 Canada 1.3 Chile 1.4 Colombia 1.5 England
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Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Christian Denomination
A Christian denomination
Christian denomination
is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organisation, leadership and doctrine. Individual bodies, however, may use alternative terms to describe themselves, such as church or sometimes fellowship. Divisions between one group and another are defined by authority and doctrine; issues such as the nature of Jesus, the authority of apostolic succession, eschatology, and papal primacy may separate one denomination from another. Groups of denominations—often sharing broadly similar beliefs, practices, and historical ties—are sometimes known as "branches of Christianity". Individual Christian groups vary widely in the degree to which they recognize one another. Several groups claim to be the direct and sole authentic successor of the church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ in the 1st century AD
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100This article may be too long to read and navigate comfortably. Please consider splitting content into sub-articles, condensing it, or adding subheadings
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Holy Angels Church (Buffalo, New York)
348 Porter Avenue Buffalo, New YorkCountry United StatesDenomination Roman CatholicHistoryFounded August 21, 1851 (1851-08-21)Founder(s) John TimonDedicated 1859ArchitectureStatus Parish churchFunctional status ActiveStyle French Romanesque RevivalCompleted 1875Holy Angels Roman Catholic Church is located in the lower west side of Buffalo, New York, adjacent to D'Youville College. The parish has been served by the Oblates of Mary Immaculate since 1851.[1]Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] At the request of Bishop John Timon, who had recently organized the Diocese of Buffalo, missionaries from the Oblates of Mary Immaculate arrived in 1851 to establish a seminary and college at the site of today's St. Joseph Cathedral rectory on Franklin Street. It quickly became clear a larger facility was needed
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