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Saddha Tissa Of Anuradhapura
Saddha Tissa was a monarch of the Kingdom of Anuradhapura, based at the ancient capital of Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
from 137 BC to 119 BC.[1] Saddha Tissa was the son of Kavan Tissa of Ruhuna
Ruhuna
and the brother of Dutthagamani. He was the ruler of Digamadulla, the present day eastern province of Sri Lanka. Since crown prince Saliya married a Chandala
Chandala
girl, King Dutugamunu’s younger brother, Saddha Tissa was consecrated as King.[1] King Saddha Tissa continued the remaining work in Mahathupa. During Saddha Tissa's reign, there was a major fire in the Lovamahapaya
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Interregnum
An interregnum (plural interregna or interregnums) is a period of discontinuity or "gap" in a government, organization, or social order. Archetypally, it was the period of time between the reign of one monarch and the next (coming from Latin inter-, "between" and rēgnum, "reign" [from rex, rēgis, "king"]), and the concepts of interregnum and regency therefore overlap. Historically, the longer and heavier interregna were typically accompanied by widespread unrest, civil and succession wars between warlords, and power vacuums filled by foreign invasions or the emergence of a new power. A failed state is usually in interregnum. The term also refers to the periods between the election of a new parliament and the establishment of a new government from that parliament in parliamentary democracies, usually ones that employ some form of proportional representation that allows small parties to elect significant numbers, requiring time for negotiations to form a government
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Sri Lanka
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri
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Kavan Tissa
Kavan Tissa, also known as Kavantissa, Kaha Wan Thissa,(that means who has the color of golden body). was the king of the Kingdom of Ruhuna in the southern part of Sri Lanka. He ruled Ruhuna, in the same time as Keleni Tissa of Maya Rata
Maya Rata
and the usurping Tamil king of Anuradhapura, Ellalan
Ellalan
of South India, expanding and beautifying the city, and projecting the power of his native Rajarata region across the island of Sri Lanka. Kavan Tissa was a great-grandson of King Devanampiyatissa's youngest brother Mahanaga, and also the father of the great Sinhalese King Dutugemunu. As with his son Dutugemunu, Kavan Tissa's figure is mostly swathed in myth and legend.[1] The main source of information on his life is Mahavamsa, the historical poem about the kings of Sri Lanka, which portrays Kavan Tissa as "devoutly believing in the three gems, [and] he provided the brotherhood continually with..
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Dighavapi
Dighavapi
Dighavapi
(Pali, "long reservoir") is a Buddhist sacred shrine and an archaeological site in the Ampara District
Ampara District
of Sri Lanka, boasting of historical records dating back to the 3rd century BCE. Water reservoirs, called "tanks", were an important feature of the hydraulic civilization of ancient Lanka, and temples and cities were built around them. The importance of Dighavapi
Dighavapi
is connected with legends about visits to this site by the Buddha himself, and many allusions to Dighavapi
Dighavapi
in the ancient chronicles as well as in the Pali
Pali
literature. It has also played a role in the political history of the region
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Lovamahapaya
Lovamahapaya
Lovamahapaya
is a building situated between Ruwanweliseya and Sri Mahabodiya in the ancient city of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is also known as the Brazen Palace or Lohaprasadaya because the roof was covered with bronze tiles. In ancient times, the building included the refectory and the uposathagara (Uposatha house). There was also a Simamalake where the Sangha assembled on Poya
Poya
days to recite the sutra of the confessional. The famous Lohaprasada built by King Dutugemunu, described as an edifice of nine stories, was a building of this class. One side of the building was 400 ft (120 m) in length. There are 40 rows, each row consisting of 40 stone pillars, for a total of 1600 pillars. It is believed that it took six years for the construction of the building and the plan was brought from the heavens
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Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
(Sinhalese: අනුරාධපුරය; Tamil: அனுராதபுரம்) is a major city in Sri Lanka. It is the capital city of North Central Province, Sri Lanka
North Central Province, Sri Lanka
and the capital of Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
District. Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
is one of the ancient capitals of Sri Lanka, famous for its well-preserved ruins of an ancient Sri Lankan civilization. It was the third capital of the Kingdom of Rajarata, following the kingdoms of Tambapanni and Upatissa Nuwara. The city, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was the centre of Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism
Buddhism
for many centuries. The city lies 205 km (127 mi) north of the current capital Colombo
Colombo
in the North Central Province, on the banks of the historic Malvathu Oya
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Ruhuna
The Principality of Ruhuna, also referred to as the Kingdom of Ruhuna, is a region of present-day Southern and Eastern Sri Lanka. It was the center of a flourishing civilization and the cultural and economic centers of ancient Sri Lanka. Magama, Tissamaharama
Tissamaharama
and Mahanagakula (now called as Ambalantota), were established here.[1][2] Ruhuna was founded around 200 BC by Prince Mahanaga, brother to Devanampiya Tissa
Devanampiya Tissa
of Anuradhapura, after a personal dispute
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Chandala
Chandala
Chandala
is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word for someone who deals with disposal of corpses, and is a Hindu
Hindu
lower caste, traditionally considered to be untouchable.[1][2]Contents1 Classification 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksClassification[edit] Varna was a hierarchical social order in ancient India, based on the Vedas. Since the Vedic corpus constitute the earliest literary source, it came to be seen as the origin of caste society. In this Brahmanical view of caste, varnas were created on a particular occasion and have remained virtually unchanged. In this ordering of society, notions of purity and pollution were central, and activities were delineated in this context
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Anuradhapura Kingdom
The Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
Kingdom (Sinhala: අනුරාධපුර රාජධානිය, Tamil:அனுராதபுர இராச்சியம்), named for its capital city, was the first established kingdom in ancient Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and Sinhalese people. Founded by King Pandukabhaya in 377 BC, the kingdom's authority extended throughout the country, although several independent areas emerged from time to time, which grew more numerous towards the end of the kingdom
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King Of Anuradhapura
The Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
Kingdom (Sinhala: අනුරාධපුර රාජධානිය, Tamil:அனுராதபுர இராச்சியம்), named for its capital city, was the first established kingdom in ancient Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and Sinhalese people. Founded by King Pandukabhaya in 377 BC, the kingdom's authority extended throughout the country, although several independent areas emerged from time to time, which grew more numerous towards the end of the kingdom
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Sena And Guttika
Sena and Guttika were two Tamil chiefs from South India
South India
who invaded the kingdom of Anuradhapura and killed King Suratissa. They reigned from 237 BC to 215 BC. They were originally two traders who came to Sri Lanka to sell horses; however, they killed Surathissa, the king of Anuradhapura, and ruled the kingdom for 22 years
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The Five Dravidians
The Five Dravidian were five Tamil Chiefs apparently from the Pandyan Dynasty who ruled the Anuradhapura Kingdom
Anuradhapura Kingdom
for 14 years from 103 BC to 88 BC.[1][2][3]Contents1 Background 2 Rulers2.1 Pulahatta 2.2 Bahiya 2.3 Panya Mara 2.4 Pilaya Mara 2.5 Dathika3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBackground[edit] Main article: Anuradhapura Kingdom Before the Five Dravidians invaded the island, the Anuradhapura Kingdom was ruled by Valagamba
Valagamba
(104–103 BC, 89–76 BC) also known as Vatthagamani Abhaya
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Kingdom Of Anuradhapura
The Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
Kingdom (Sinhala: අනුරාධපුර රාජධානිය, Tamil:அனுராதபுர இராச்சியம்), named for its capital city, was the first established kingdom in ancient Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and Sinhalese people. Founded by King Pandukabhaya in 377 BC, the kingdom's authority extended throughout the country, although several independent areas emerged from time to time, which grew more numerous towards the end of the kingdom
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Viharamahadevi
Viharamahadevi[1] (Sinhala:විහාරමහාදේවි) was the mother of King Dutugamunu, Saddhatissa and the Queen consort of King Kavantissa (King of the Ruhuna Sri Lanka).According to recent findings her name might have been "Sharwaree" which means evening. Queen Viharamahadevi
Viharamahadevi
was the daughter of King Kelanitissa who ruled Kelaniya.[2] The King once punished an innocent monk by boiling him alive in a cauldron of oil. It is said that the gods, angered over this cruel deed, made the ocean rush inland and flood the land. Soothsayers said that if a princess was sacrificed to the sea, the raging waves would stop. The young princess sacrificed herself for the sins of her father and for the safety of her motherland
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Bhatikabhaya Abhaya Of Anuradhapura
Bhatikabhaya Abhaya was King of Anuradhapura
King of Anuradhapura
in the 1st century BC, whose reign lasted from 20 BC to 9 AD
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