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SS-Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
([ˈhaʊ̯pt.ʃtʊʁm.fyːʀɐ], "head storm leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank that was used in several Nazi organizations such as the SS, NSKK and the NSFK. The rank of Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
was a mid-level commander and had equivalent seniority to a captain (Hauptmann) in the German Army and also the equivalency of captain in foreign armies.[1] The rank of Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
evolved from the older rank of Sturmhauptführer, created as a rank of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA)
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Max Seela
Max Seela
Max Seela
(15 July 1911 – 31 July 1999) was a lieutenant colonel (Obersturmbannführer) in the Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross.Contents1 Career 2 Awards and decorations 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 BibliographyCareer[edit] Max Seela
Max Seela
was born in 1911 at Schöneiche
Schöneiche
near Berlin. He enlisted in Reichswehr
Reichswehr
(German Army) in 1929 and was then transferred into the SS-VT in 1935. His SS service number was 257,323 and his NSDAP
NSDAP
number was 147,126. In September 1935 he joined the SS Pioneer Battalion. By October 1939 Seela had been given command of a company in the pioneer battalion of the SS Division Totenkopf. He was awarded the Iron Cross, 2nd class, in May 1940 and the Iron Cross, 1st class, in June 1940
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Anwärter
SS- Anwärter [ˈanˌvɛʁtɐ] is a German title which translates as “candidate” or "applicant". During the Third Reich, Anwärter/SS- Anwärter was used as a paramilitary rank by both the NSDAP
NSDAP
and the SS. Within the Nazi Party, an Anwärter was someone who had been accepted into a government service position and the rank was issued in two degrees: one for party members and the other for non-party members
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Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
([ˈoːbɐ.ʃtʊʁm.fyːʀɐ], "senior storm leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank that was used in several Nazi organisations, such as the SA, SS, NSKK and the NSFK. The term is translated as “senior assault (or storm) leader”.[1] [2] The rank of Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
was first created in 1932 as the result of an expansion of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA) and the need for an additional rank in the officer corps. Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
also became an SS rank at that same time.[3] An SA- Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
was typically a junior company commander in charge of fifty to a hundred men
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Sturmbannführer
Sturmbannführer
Sturmbannführer
([ˈʃtʊʁm.ban.fyːʀɐ], "assault unit leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank equivalent to major[1] that was used in several Nazi organizations, such as the SA, SS, and the NSFK. Translated as "assault (or storm) unit leader"[2] (Sturmbann being the SA and early SS equivalent to a battalion), the rank originated from German shock troop units of the First World War. The SA title of Sturmbannführer
Sturmbannführer
was first established in 1921
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Shoulder Mark
A shoulder mark, also called an epaulette, shoulder board, rank slide, or slip-on ,[1] is a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform. It may bear rank or other insignia.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 United States3.1 Military 3.2 Boy Scouts of America4 United Kingdom4.1 Royal Navy 4.2 Army 4.3 Royal Air Force 4.4 St. John Ambulance 4.5 Police5 References 6 Notes 7 External linksAustralia[edit] The newer Auscam
Auscam
uniform design lacks shoulder marks, instead opting for a vertical strap in the middle of the chest region of the uniform. Rank insignia tags are slipped onto this strap. Unlike the older uniform designs, there are slip-ons for every rank in the Australian Defence Force.[citation needed] The older Auscam
Auscam
uniform designs featured shoulder straps, upon which slip-on rank insignia of Commissioned Officers could be affixed, and non-commissioned officers in the Air Force and Navy only
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Gorget Patches
Gorget
Gorget
patches (collar tabs, collar patches) are an insignia, paired patches of cloth or metal on the collar (gorget) of the uniform, that is used in the military and civil service in some countries
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Military Camouflage
Military camouflage
Military camouflage
is the use of camouflage by a military force to protect personnel and equipment from observation by enemy forces. In practice, this means applying colour and materials to military equipment of all kinds, including vehicles, ships, aircraft, gun positions and battledress, either to conceal it from observation (crypsis), or to make it appear as something else (mimicry). The French slang word camouflage came into common English usage during World War I
World War I
when the concept of visual deception developed into an essential part of modern military tactics. In that war, long-range artillery and observation from the air combined to expand the field of fire, and camouflage was widely used to decrease the danger of being targeted or to enable surprise
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Ranks And Insignia Of The Sturmabteilung
The uniforms and insignia of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA) were Nazi Party paramilitary ranks and uniforms used by SA stormtroopers from 1921 until the fall of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in 1945. The titles and phrases used by the SA were the basis for paramilitary titles used by several other Nazi paramilitary groups, among them the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Nazi Germany Paramilitary Ranks
National Socialist paramilitary ranks were pseudo-military titles which were used by the Nazis, represented by the Nazi Party, the National Socialist German Workers' Party
National Socialist German Workers' Party
(Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; NSDAP), between the years of 1920 and 1945. Since the
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Junker (SS Rank)
SS- Junker
Junker
or Standartenjunker was a paramilitary Nazi rank that was used by the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) between the years of 1933 and 1945. The rank was a special position held by those aspiring for officer commissions in the armed wing of the SS, first known as the SS-Verfügungstruppe
SS-Verfügungstruppe
and later as the Waffen-SS. The SS rank of Junker
Junker
was an appointed position with an SS member required to enlist in the SS for at least six months to a year before consideration could be given for officer training
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Waffen-SS
The Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
(German pronunciation: [ˈvafən.ɛs.ɛs], Armed SS) was the armed wing of the Nazi Party's SS organisation
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Schütze
Schütze
Schütze
in German means "rifleman" or "shooter",[1] or in older terms originally connoted "archer" before the advent of the rifle. It also occasionally occurs as a surname, or as Schütz, as in the opera Der Freischütz. The word itself is derived from the German word schützen, meaning to protect, or to guard. It was originally used for archers as they protected castle walls, and is the German equivalent to Sagittarius, the mythical form which held bow and arrow.[citation needed]Contents1 Overview 2 Second World War 3 Modern-day Schütze 4 See also 5 Notes 6 BibliographyOverview[edit] Schütze
Schütze
Div. Großdeutschland (1943)As a rank of the Armed Forces of Germany
Germany
in First World War until 1918, Schütze
Schütze
was used for the lowest enlisted ranks in machine gun units and some elite troops like Saxon Schützen-Regiment 108 exclusively
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Oberschütze
Oberschütze
Oberschütze
([ˈoːbɐ.ʃʏʦə], "senior rifleman") was a German military rank first used in the Bavarian Army
Bavarian Army
of the late 19th century.Contents1 Usage 2 Waffen-SS 3 See also 4 Notes 5 BibliographyUsage[edit] Following its use in the Bavarian Army, the rank was in general introduced into the infantry branch of the German Reichswehr
Reichswehr
from circa 1920 and continued use in its successor the German Wehrmacht until 1945, with exception of the period from October 1934 to October 1936 where no promotions to this rank took place
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