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SOS
SOS
SOS
is the International Morse code
Morse code
distress signal (▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄); the bar over it indicates to omit the normal gaps between the letters. This distress signal was first adopted by the German government radio regulations effective 1 April 1905, and became the worldwide standard under the second International Radiotelegraphic Convention, which was signed on 3 November 1906, and became effective on 1 July 1908. SOS
SOS
remained the maritime radio distress signal until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System.[1] SOS
SOS
is still recognized as a visual distress signal.[2] The SOS
SOS
distress signal is a continuous sequence of three dots, three dashes, and three dots, with no spaces between the letters (notated by the overbar)
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2182 KHz
The radio frequency 2182 kHz is one of the international calling and distress frequencies for maritime radiocommunication in a frequency band allocated to the mobile service on primary basis, exclusively for distress and calling operations.[1]Contents1 Transmission modes 2 Range 3 Silence period 4 Licensing 5 Related distress frequencies 6 Discontinued frequencies 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTransmission modes[edit] Transmissions on 2182 kHz commonly use single-sideband modulation (SSB) (upper sideband only)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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RMS Lusitania
Liverpool
Liverpool
to New York City
New York City
Via Cherbourg, France and Cork, Ireland Ship Disaster : 1915 English channel torpedoed by German U boat off the coast of IrelandBuilder: John Brown & Co, Clydebank, ScotlandYard number: 367Laid down: 17 August 1904Launched: 7 June 1906[1]Christened: Mary, Lady Inverclyde[2]Acquired: 26 August 1907Maiden voyage: 7 September 1907In service: 1907–1915Fate: Torpedoed by German U-boat
U-boat
U-20 on Friday 7 May 1915
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List Of Shipwrecks Of North Carolina
This is a list of shipwrecks located off the coast of North Carolina. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Ship Sunk date Notes CoordinatesUSS Aeolus (ARC-3) August 1988 Sunk as an artificial reef. 34°16.685′N 76°38.659′W / 34.278083°N 76.644317°W / 34.278083; -76.644317 (USS Aeolus (ARC-3))Adventure 10 June 1718 Sloop under the command of Blackbeard
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Samuel Robison
Admiral
Admiral
Samuel Shelburne Robison CB, USN (May 10, 1867 – November 20, 1952) was a United States
United States
Navy officer whose service extended from the 1890s through the early 1930s. He held several major commands during World War I, and from 1928-1931 served as Superintendent of the United States
United States
Naval Academy. In 1933, Admiral
Admiral
Robison also founded a Naval Preparatory Academy in Pine Beach, New Jersey called Admiral Farragut Academy.Contents1 Early life and career 2 World War I
World War I
service 3 Post-war service and retirement 4 See alsoEarly life and career[edit] Robison was born on May 10, 1867 in Juniata County, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
He entered the United States
United States
Naval Academy on September 4, 1884
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Call Sign
In broadcasting and radio communications, a call sign (also known as a call name or call letters—and historically as a call signal—or abbreviated as a call) is a unique designation for a transmitter station. In the United States of America, they are used for all FCC-licensed transmitters.[1] A call sign can be formally assigned by a government agency, informally adopted by individuals or organizations, or even cryptographically encoded to disguise a station's identity. The use of call signs as unique identifiers dates to the landline railroad telegraph system. Because there was only one telegraph line linking all railroad stations, there needed to be a way to address each one when sending a telegram. In order to save time, two-letter identifiers were adopted for this purpose. This pattern continued in radiotelegraph operation; radio companies initially assigned two-letter identifiers to coastal stations and stations aboard ships at sea
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Battle Of The Atlantic
 Germany  Italy (1940–43)Commanders and leaders Martin E. Nasmith (1939–41) Sir Percy Noble (1941–42) Sir Max K. Horton (1943–45) Frederick Bowhill
Frederick Bowhill
(1939–41) Philip de la Ferté (1941–43) Sir John Slessor
John Slessor
(1943–45) Dudley Pound
Dudley Pound
(1939–43) Leonard W. Murray Ernest J. King Royal E
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Sécurité
When a marine radio transmission begins with the phrase "Sécurité, sécurité, sécurité" (/seɪˈkjʊərɪteɪ/; French: sécurité), it means that what follows is important safety information. The most common use of this is by coast radio stations before the broadcast of navigational warnings and meteorological information. Navigational warnings are issued regularly and usually give information about people or vessels in distress and objects or events that can be an immediate danger to people at sea and how they are navigating. In the United States, MARAD
MARAD
(Marine Administration) sends out infrequent advisories about potential global political climate dangers. There are four types of navigational warnings, which are categorized by their location. These areas are NAVAREA IV, HYDROLANT, NAVAREA XII, and HYDROPAC. Meteorological information is information that is about the marine atmosphere
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Electrical Telegraph
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Ambigram
An ambigram is a word, art form or other symbolic representation whose elements retain meaning when viewed or interpreted from a different direction, perspective, or orientation.An animation of a rotationally symmetric ambigram for the word "ambigram"Another ambigram for the word "ambigram" with different letter transformations from the ambigram aboveEarly published ambigram by Mitchell T. Lavin in The Strand Magazine, June 1908The meaning of the ambigram may either change, or remain the same, when viewed or interpreted from different perspectives. Douglas R. Hofstadter
Douglas R

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