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Ségéne Of Iona
Saint Ségéne (also called Segein, Segeni, Segeno, Seghene, Segin, Segine, Ségíne, Segineus, Segini, Seighin) b. c. 610 - d. 24 May 688, was the Bishop of Armagh, Ireland
Ireland
from 661 to 24 May 688.Contents1 Genealogy and Birth 2 Priesthood 3 Bishop of Armagh 4 Death 5 Feast Day 6 ReferencesGenealogy and Birth[edit] St. Ségéne was from Achad Chlaidib (Field of the Sword), possibly the modern townland of Aghnacloy, Barony of Oneilland East, County Armagh. His father’s name was Bresal [1] Priesthood[edit] At this time the Irish Church was preoccupied with the Paschal cycle Question, i.e. how to compute the date of Easter and Christ’s death. The southern part of Ireland
Ireland
accepted the Dionysian computation - which was now being used at Rome - at the Synod of Magh Lene in 630 A.D
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Archbishop Of Armagh
The Archbishop of Armagh
Armagh
is an archiepiscopacy in both the Church of Ireland and the Roman Catholic Church, two of the main Christian churches in Ireland. It takes its name after the city of Armagh
Armagh
in Northern Ireland. The ordinary also holds the title of Primate of All Ireland in each church
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Oneilland East
Oneilland
Oneilland
East (from Irish: Uí Nialláin, the name of an ancient Gaelic district)[2][3] is a barony in the north-east of County Armagh, Northern Ireland.[4] It is also called Clanbrasil (from Clann Bhreasail, "offspring of Breasal").[5] It lies in the north-east corner of the county, on the south-eastern shore of Lough Neagh
Lough Neagh
and the boundary with County Down
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County Armagh
County Armagh
Armagh
(named after its county town, Armagh) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the southern shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 1,326 km²[4] and has a population of about 174,792
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Paschal Cycle
The Paschal cycle, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, is the cycle of the moveable feasts built around Pascha (Easter). The cycle consists of approximately ten weeks before and seven weeks after Pascha. The ten weeks before Pascha are known as the period of the Triodion (referring to the liturgical book that contains the services for this liturgical season). This period includes the three weeks preceding Great Lent (the "pre-Lenten period"), the forty days of Lent, and Holy Week. The 50 days following Pascha are called the Pentecostarion
Pentecostarion
(again, named after the liturgical book). The Sunday of each week has a special commemoration, named for the Gospel
Gospel
reading assigned to that day. Certain other weekdays have special commemorations of their own (see outline, below). The entire cycle revolves around Pascha
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Tómméne
Saint Tómméne (also called Thoman, Thomanus, Thomenus, Thomian, Thomianus, Thomienus, Toimen, Toimene, Tóiméne, Tomiano, Tómíne, Tomini, Tomméin, Tommene,Tommine, Tomyn, Comméne, Comyn, Terenannus) b. c.580 - d.10 January 661, was the Bishop of Armagh, Ireland
Ireland
from 623 to 10 January 661.Contents1 Genealogy and Birth 2 Bishop of Armagh 3 The Paschal Controversies 4 Battle of Moira 5 Death 6 Feast Day 7 ReferencesGenealogy and Birth[edit] St. Tómméne was probably a member of a tribe from North-East Ulster as was usual for Bishops of Armagh at this time
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Pope Severinus
Pope Severinus (d. 2 August 640) was Pope two months, from 28 May until his death on 2 Aug. He became caught up in a power struggle with the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius over the ongoing Monothelite controversy.[1]Contents1 Election and struggle with Constantinople 2 Actions as Pope and death 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesElection and struggle with Constantinople[edit] He was a Roman. His father was named Avienus, according to the Liber Pontificalis
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Pope John IV
Pope
Pope
John IV (Latin: Ioannes IV; died 12 October 642) reigned from 24 December 640 to his death in 642. His election followed a four-month sede vacante.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Pope
Pope
John was a native of Zadar, Dalmatia.[1] He was the son of the scholasticus (advocate) Venantius. At the time of his election he was archdeacon of the Roman Church, an important role in governing the see
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Coarb
A coarb, from the Old Irish comarbae (Modern Irish comharba), meaning "heir" or "successor",[1] was a distinctive office of the later medieval church among the Gaels
Gaels
of Ireland and Scotland. In this period coarb appears interchangeable with "erenach", denoting the episcopally nominated lay guardian of a parish church and headman of the family in hereditary occupation of church lands. The coarb, however, often had charge of a church which had held comparatively high rank in pre‐Norman Ireland, or one still possessed of relatively extensive termon lands.[2] Also as per this article "..
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Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
(Latin: Patricius; Irish: Pádraig [ˈpˠaːd̪ˠɾˠəɟ]; Welsh: Padrig) was a fifth-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland. Known as the "Apostle of Ireland", he is the primary patron saint of Ireland, along with saints Brigit of Kildare
Brigit of Kildare
and Columba. He is venerated in the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Churches, Anglican Communion, the Old Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and in the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
as equal-to-the-apostles and Enlightener of Ireland.[2][3] The dates of Patrick's life cannot be fixed with certainty, but there is broad agreement that he was active as a missionary in Ireland during the second half of the 5th century
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Aed Of Sletty
Áed of Sletty was a Gaelic Irish Bishop and anchorite, fl. late 7th century. Biography[edit] Áed was a member of the Uí Bairrche. He was bishop of Sletty, County Laois, and patron of Muirchu Maccu Machteni, who at Áed's request wrote a life of Saint Patrick, which is contained in the Book of Armagh. Áed is also responsible for making a grant of his familia of churches to Armagh, his bishopric consisting of central and southern Leinster. The reasons for his doing so are unclear. He is believed to have sought protection from the encroaching claims of Kildare. He had made the grant before 688 to Ségéne of Armagh. Charles-Thomas (p. 262) writes: "Sleaty ... was in the vassal kingdom of Uí Bairrche Tíre, and the likelihood is that the Uí Dúnlainge, who had recently made themselves masters and patrons of Kildare, seemed to Áed to be in a position to threaten the independence of Sletty
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Book Of Armagh
The Book of Armagh
Armagh
or Codex Ardmachanus (ar or 61), also known as the Canon of Patrick and the Liber Ar(d)machanus, is a 9th-century Irish illuminated manuscript written mainly in Latin. It is held by the Library of Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
(MS 52). The document is valuable for containing early texts relating to St Patrick
St Patrick
and some of the oldest surviving specimens of Old Irish, and for being one of the earliest manuscripts produced by an insular church to contain a near complete copy of the New Testament.Contents1 History 2 Manuscript 3 Illumination 4 Dating of the Manuscript 5 Contents5.1 Texts relating to St Patrick 5.2 New Testament
New Testament
material 5.3 Life of St Martin6 Bibliography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The manuscript was once reputed to have belonged to St. Patrick
St

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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Ségéne
Saint Ségéne (also called Segein, Segeni, Segeno, Seghene, Segin, Segine, Ségíne, Segineus, Segini, Seighin) b. c. 610 - d. 24 May 688, was the Bishop of Armagh, Ireland
Ireland
from 661 to 24 May 688.Contents1 Genealogy and Birth 2 Priesthood 3 Bishop of Armagh 4 Death 5 Feast Day 6 ReferencesGenealogy and Birth[edit] St. Ségéne was from Achad Chlaidib (Field of the Sword), possibly the modern townland of Aghnacloy, Barony of Oneilland East, County Armagh. His father’s name was Bresal [1] Priesthood[edit] At this time the Irish Church was preoccupied with the Paschal cycle Question, i.e. how to compute the date of Easter and Christ’s death. The southern part of Ireland
Ireland
accepted the Dionysian computation - which was now being used at Rome - at the Synod of Magh Lene in 630 A.D
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Ségéne Mac Fiachnaí
Ségéne mac Fiachnaí (or Ségéne of Iona) (died 12 August 652) was the fifth abbot of the Iona Abbey in Scotland (623–652). Ségéne was of the Cenél Conaill, the same kindred as Columba, and he was the nephew of a previous abbot, Lasrén. It was during Ségéne's long abbacy that the famous controversy regarding the dating of Easter first made itself properly felt. Ségéne is known to have vigorously defended the Gaelic dating, and put his name to a letter written by the Gaelic clergy to Pope Severinus in 638. Ségéne also established the first Gaelic missionaries amongst the English, sending Corman and then Áedan, the latter of whom, with the help of King Oswald of Northumbria (who himself had spent time in exile at Iona), established a daughter house and bishopric at Lindisfarne
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