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Rutherford B. Hayes
American Civil WarBattle of South Mountain (WIA) Valley Campaigns of 1864Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American congressman, governor of Ohio, and the 19th president of the United States
United States
from 1877 to 1881. Hayes was a lawyer and staunch abolitionist who defended runaway slaves in court proceedings. He fought and was seriously wounded fighting in the Union Army
Union Army
during the American Civil War. He assumed the presidency at the end of the Reconstruction Era
Reconstruction Era
through the Compromise of 1877. In office he ended Army support for Republican state governments in the South, promoted civil service reform, and attempted to reconcile the divisions left over from the Civil War and Reconstruction. Hayes, an attorney in Ohio, was city solicitor of Cincinnati
Cincinnati
from 1858 to 1861
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Wounded In Action
Wounded in action (WIA) describes combatants who have been wounded while fighting in a combat zone during wartime, but have not been killed. Typically it implies that they are temporarily or permanently incapable of bearing arms or continuing to fight.[1] For the U.S. military, becoming WIA in combat generally results in subsequent conferral of the Purple Heart, because the purpose of the medal itself (one of the highest awards, military or civilian, officially given by the American government) is to recognize those killed, incapacitated, or wounded in battle.Contents1 NATO's definitions1.1 Wounded in action 1.2 Died of wounds received in action2 References 3 See alsoNATO's definitions[edit] Wounded in action[edit] A battle casualty other than killed in action who has incurred an injury due to an external agent or cause
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Solicitor
A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be described as a solicitor and enabled to practise there as such. For example, in England and Wales
England and Wales
a solicitor is admitted to practise under the provisions of the Solicitors Act 1974. With some exceptions, practising solicitors must possess a practising certificate. There are many more solicitors than barristers in England; they undertake the general aspects of giving legal advice and conducting legal proceedings.[1] In the United Kingdom, a few Australian states, Hong Kong, South Africa (where they are called attorneys) and Ireland, the legal profession is split between solicitors and barristers (called advocates in some countries), and a lawyer will usually only hold one of the two titles
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Valley Campaigns Of 1864
The Valley Campaigns of 1864
Valley Campaigns of 1864
were American Civil War
American Civil War
operations and battles that took place in the Shenandoah Valley
Shenandoah Valley
of Virginia
Virginia
from May to October 1864
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Abolitionist
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
is a general term which describes the movement to end slavery. This term can be used formally or informally. In Western Europe and the Americas, abolitionism is a historical movement in effort to end the African and Indian slave trade and set slaves free. King Charles I of Spain, usually known as Emperor Charles V, was following the example of Louis X of France
Louis X of France
who abolished slavery within the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
in 1315. He passed a law which would have abolished colonial slavery in 1542, although this law was not passed in the largest colonial states, and was not enforced. In the late 17th century, the Roman Catholic Church, taking up a plea by Lourenço da Silva de Mendouça, officially condemned the slave trade, which was affirmed vehemently by Pope Gregory XVI
Pope Gregory XVI
in 1839
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Brigadier General (United States)
In the United States Armed Forces, brigadier general (BG, BGen, or Brig Gen) is a one-star general officer with the pay grade of O-7 in the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force. Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general. The rank of brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services (the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, as both Armed Forces and Uniformed Services; and the Public Health Service and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, as Uniformed Services). The NATO
NATO
equivalent is OF-6.Contents1 History 2 Statutory limits 3 Promotion, appointment and tour length 4 Retirement 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The rank of brigadier general has existed in the U.S. military since the inception of the Continental Army
Continental Army
in June 1775
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Union Army
American Indian Wars American Civil WarFort Sumter First Bull Run Wilson's Creek Forts Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg Raid Mississippi River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Bull Run South Mountain Antietam Hartsville Fredericksburg Stones River Chancellorsville Gettysburg Champion Hill Vicksburg siege Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania Sabine Pass New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg siege Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief 16th President of the United States
United States
- Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(1861-1865) 17th President Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(1865)General-in-Chief 1st: Winfield Scott 2nd: George B. McClellan 3rd: Henry W. Halleck Final: Ulysses S
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-outpu
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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United States Volunteers
United States Volunteers also known as U.S. Volunteers, U. S. Vol., or U.S.V. were military volunteers enlisted in the United States Army
United States Army
who were separate from the Regular Army. Starting as early as 1861 these regiments were often referred to as the Volunteer Army of the United States but not officially named (codified into law) that until 1898. During the nineteenth century this was the United States federal government's main means for raising large forces of citizen-soldiers needed in wartime to augment the small Regular Army and organized militia and National Guard. The U.S. Volunteers were the forerunner of the National Army in World War I
World War I
and the Army of the United States in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The U.S. Volunteers did not exist in times of peace
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Brevet (military)
In many of the world's military establishments, a brevet (/brəˈvɛt/ ( listen) or /ˈbrɛvɪt/ ( listen))[1] was a warrant giving a commissioned officer a higher rank title as a reward for gallantry or meritorious conduct but without conferring the authority, precedence, or pay of real rank.[2] An officer so promoted was referred to as being brevetted (for example, "he was brevetted major general"). The promotion would be noted in the officer's title (for example, "Bvt. Maj. Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain" or "Bvt. Col
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Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
(/ˌsɪnsɪˈnæti/ SIN-sih-NAT-ee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio
and seat of Hamilton County.[7] Settled in 1788, the city was located at the north side of the confluence of the Licking River to the Ohio. The city drives the Cincinnati–Middletown–Wilmington combined statistical area, which had a population of 2,172,191 in the 2010 census.[8] With a population of 298,800, Cincinnati
Cincinnati
is the third-largest city proper in Ohio
Ohio
and the 65th-biggest in the United States. It is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwestern United States[9] and the 28th-biggest metropolitan statistical area in the United States
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Major General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and United States Air Force, major general is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general.[1][Note 1] A major general typically commands division-sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. Higher ranks are technically temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History4.1 U.S. Army 4.2 Confederate States Army 4.3 U.S. Marine Corps 4.4 U.S
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Major General
Major
Major
general (abbreviated MG,[1] Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general. (Although a major outranks a lieutenant, a lieutenant outranks a sergeant-major). In the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
and the United States, it is a division commander's rank subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general
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