HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Russian Phonology
This article discusses the phonological system of standard Russian based on the Moscow
Moscow
dialect (unless otherwise noted). For an overview of dialects in the Russian language, see Russian dialects. Most descriptions of Russian describe it as having five vowel phonemes, though there is some dispute over whether a sixth vowel, /ɨ/, is separate from /i/. Russian has 34 consonants, which can be divided into two sets:hard (твёрдый  [ˈtvʲɵrdɨj] (help·info)) or plain soft (мягкий  [ˈmʲæxʲkʲɪj]) or palatalizedRussian also distinguishes hard consonants from soft (palatalized) consonants and from a soft consonant followed by /j/ or a hard consonant followed by /j/ (though the last is uncommon: /C Cʲ Cʲj Cj/), and preserves palatalized consonants that are followed by another consonant more often than other Slavic languages
Slavic languages
do
[...More...]

"Russian Phonology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Romanization Of Russian
Romanization
Romanization
of Russian is the process of transliterating the Russian language from the Cyrillic script
Cyrillic script
into the Latin script. As well as its primary use for citing Russian names and words in languages which use a Latin alphabet, romanization is also essential for computer users to input Russian text who either do not have a keyboard or word processor set up for inputting Cyrillic, or else are not capable of typing rapidly using a native Russian keyboard layout (JCUKEN)
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Russian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Back Vowel
A back vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a back vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far back as possible in the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant. Back vowels are sometimes also called dark vowels because they are perceived as sounding darker than the front vowels.[1] Near-back vowels are essentially a type of back vowels; no language is known to contrast back and near-back vowels based on backness alone.Contents1 Articulation 2 Partial list 3 See also 4 ReferencesArticulation[edit] In their articulation, back vowels do not form a single category, but may be either raised vowels such as [u] or retracted vowels such as [ɑ].[2] Unrounded back vowels are typically centralized, that is, near-back in their articulation
[...More...]

"Back Vowel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

У
U (У у; italics: У у) is a letter of the Cyrillic script. It commonly represents the close back rounded vowel /u/, somewhat like the pronunciation of ⟨oo⟩ in "boot". The forms of the Cyrillic letter U are similar to the lowercase of the Latin letter Y (Y y; Y y), but like most other Cyrillic letters, the upper and lowercase forms are similar in shape and differ mainly in size and vertical placement.Contents1 History 2 In other languages 3 Related letters and other similar characters 4 Computing codes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Historically, Cyrillic U evolved as a specifically East Slavic short form of the digraph ⟨оу⟩ used in ancient Slavic texts to represent /u/
[...More...]

"У" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

О
O (О о; italics: О о) is a letter of the Cyrillic script. O commonly represents the close-mid back rounded vowel /o/, like the pronunciation of ⟨o⟩ in Scottish English "go".Contents1 History 2 Form2.1 Modern fonts 2.2 Church Slavonic printed fonts and Slavonic manuscripts3 Usage 4 Related letters and other similar characters 5 Computing codes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Cyrillic letter O was derived from the Greek letter Omicron (Ο ο). The name of O in the Early Cyrillic alphabet
Early Cyrillic alphabet
was онъ (onŭ), meaning "he
[...More...]

"О" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Э
E (Э э; italics: Э э; also known as backwards e, from Russian э оборо́тное, e oborótnoye, [ˈɛ ɐbɐˈrotnəjə]) is a letter found in two Slavic languages: Russian and Belarusian. It represents the [e] and [ɛ], as e in word "editor". In other Slavic languages
Slavic languages
that use the Cyrillic script, the sounds are represented by Ye (Е е), which represents in Russian and Belarusian [je] in initial and postvocalic position or [e] and palatalizes the preceding consonant. In Cyrillic Moldovan, which was used in the Moldovan SSR
Moldovan SSR
during the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and is still used in Transnistria, the letter corresponds to ă in the Latin Romanian alphabet
[...More...]

"Э" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

А
A (А а; italics: А а) is a letter of the Cyrillic script. It commonly represents an open central unrounded vowel /a/, like the pronunciation of ⟨a⟩ in "father". The Cyrillic letter А is romanized using the Latin letter A.Contents1 History 2 Form 3 Usage 4 Related letters and other similar characters 5 Computing codes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Letter А in ABC by Elisabeth BohmThe Cyrillic letter А was derived directly from the Greek letter Alpha
Alpha
(Α α). In the Early Cyrillic alphabet
Early Cyrillic alphabet
its name was азъ (azǔ), meaning "I"
[...More...]

"А" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Proto-Slavic
Proto-Slavic is the unattested, reconstructed proto-language of all the Slavic languages. It represents Slavic speech approximately from the 5th to 9th centuries AD. As with most other proto-languages, no attested writings have been found; scholars have reconstructed the language by applying the comparative method to all the attested Slavic languages and by taking into account other Indo-European languages. Rapid development of Slavic speech occurred during the Proto-Slavic period, coinciding with the massive expansion of the Slavic-speaking area. Dialectal differentiation occurred early on during this period, but overall linguistic unity and mutual intelligibility continued for several centuries, into the 10th century or later
[...More...]

"Proto-Slavic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Komi Republic
The Komi Republic
Komi Republic
(Russian: Респу́блика Ко́ми, tr. Respúblika Kómi; Komi: Коми Республика, translit. Komi Respublika) is a federal subject of Russia
Russia
(a republic). Its capital is the city of Syktyvkar
[...More...]

"Komi Republic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ы
Yery, Yeru, Ery or Eru (Ы, ы, usually called "Ы" [ɨ] in modern Russian or "еры" yerý historically and in modern Church Slavonic) is a letter in the Cyrillic script. It represents the phoneme /i/ (more rear or upper than i) after non-palatalised (hard) consonants in the Belarusian and Russian alphabets. Because of phonological processes, the actual realisation of /i/ after alveolar consonants (⟨д⟩, ⟨з⟩, ⟨л⟩, ⟨н⟩, ⟨р⟩, ⟨с⟩, ⟨т⟩, or ⟨ц⟩) is retracted to a close central unrounded vowel [ɯ] or [ʷɨ], after labials: ⟨б⟩, ⟨в⟩, ⟨м⟩, ⟨п⟩. In Rusyn, it denotes a sound a bit harder than [ɨ] and close to the Romanian sound î, also written â
[...More...]

"Ы" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

И
I (И и; italics: И и) is a letter used in almost all Cyrillic alphabets. It commonly represents the close front unrounded vowel /i/, like the pronunciation of ⟨i⟩ in "machine", or the near-close near-front unrounded vowel /ɪ/, like the pronunciation of ⟨i⟩ in "bin".Contents1 History 2 Form 3 Usage 4 Accented forms and derived letters 5 Related letters and similar characters 6 Computing codes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Cyrillic letter I was derived from the Greek letter Eta (Η η)
[...More...]

"И" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open Central Unrounded Vowel
The open central unrounded vowel, or low central unrounded vowel,[1] is a type of vowel sound, used in many spoken languages. While the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
officially has no dedicated letter for this sound between front [a] and back [ɑ], it is normally written ⟨a⟩. If precision is required, it can be specified by using diacritics, such as centralized ⟨ä⟩ or retracted ⟨a̠⟩, but this is not common. Acoustically, however, [a] is an extra-low central vowel.[2] It is more common to use plain [a] for an open central vowel and, if needed, [æ] (officially near-open front vowel) for an open front vowel. Alternatively, Sinologists may use the letter ⟨ᴀ⟩ (small capital A)
[...More...]

"Open Central Unrounded Vowel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Open Vowel
An open vowel is a vowel sound in which the tongue is positioned as far as possible from the roof of the mouth. Open vowels are sometimes also called low vowels (in American terminology [1]) in reference to the low position of the tongue. In the context of the phonology of any particular language, a low vowel can be any vowel that is more open than a mid vowel
[...More...]

"Open Vowel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mid Vowel
Paired vowels are: unrounded • roundedA mid vowel (or a true-mid vowel) is any in a class of vowel sounds used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a mid vowel is that the tongue is positioned midway between an open vowel and a close vowel. Other names for a mid vowel are lowered close-mid vowel and raised open-mid vowel, though the former phrase may also be used to describe a vowel that is as low as open-mid; likewise, the latter phrase may also be used to describe a vowel that is as high as close-mid. Vowels[edit] The only mid vowel with a dedicated symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet is the mid central vowel with ambiguous rounding [ə]. The IPA divides the vowel space into thirds, with the close-mid vowels such as [e] or [o] and the open-mid vowels such as [ɛ] or [ɔ] equidistant in formant space between open [a] or [ɒ] and close [i] or [u]
[...More...]

"Mid Vowel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Close Vowel
A close vowel, also known as a high vowel (in American terminology [1]), is any in a class of vowel sound used in many spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a close vowel is that the tongue is positioned as close as possible to the roof of the mouth as it can be without creating a constriction. A constriction would produce a sound that would be classified as a consonant. The term "close" (/kloʊs/, as in the opposite of "far") is prescribed by the International Phonetic Association. Close vowels are often referred to as "high" vowels, as in the Americanist phonetic tradition, because the tongue is positioned high in the mouth during articulation. In the context of the phonology of any particular language, a high vowel can be any vowel that is more close than a mid vowel
[...More...]

"Close Vowel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Complementary Distribution
In linguistics, complementary distribution, as distinct from contrastive distribution and free variation, is the relationship between two different elements of the same kind, where one element is found in one set of environments and the other element is found in a non-intersecting (i.e. complementary) set of environments. It often indicates that two superficially different elements are the same linguistic unit at a deeper level. It is possible for more than two elements to be in complementary distribution with one another.Contents1 In phonology 2 In morphology 3 See also 4 ReferencesIn phonology[edit] Main article: Allophone Complementary distribution is the distribution of phones in their respective phonetic environments such that one never appears in the same phonetic context as the other
[...More...]

"Complementary Distribution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.