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Rural Cemetery Act
The Rural Cemetery
Cemetery
Act was a law passed by the New York Legislature
New York Legislature
on April 27, 1847, that authorized commercial burial grounds in rural New York state
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Troy, New York
Troy
Troy
is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the seat of Rensselaer County. The city is located on the western edge of Rensselaer County and on the eastern bank of the Hudson River. Troy has close ties to the nearby cities of Albany and Schenectady, forming a region popularly called the Capital District. The city is one of the three major centers for the Albany Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which has a population of 1,170,483. At the 2010 census, the population of Troy
Troy
was 50,129. Troy's motto is Ilium fuit. Troja est, which means "Ilium was, Troy
Troy
is".[3] Today, Troy
Troy
is home to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the oldest private engineering and technical university in the USA founded in 1824
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Middle Village, Queens
Middle Village is a mainly residential neighborhood in the central section of the borough of Queens, New York City, bounded to the north by the Long Island Expressway, to the east by Woodhaven Boulevard, to the south by Cooper Avenue, and to the west by Mount Olivet Cemetery.[2] A small trapezoid-shaped area bounded by Mt. Olivet Crescent to the east, Fresh Pond Road to the west, Eliot Avenue to the north, and Metropolitan Avenue
Metropolitan Avenue
to the south, is often counted as part of Middle Village but is sometimes considered part of nearby Ridgewood. Middle Village is bordered by the neighborhoods of Elmhurst to the north, Maspeth and Ridgewood to the west, Glendale to the south, and Rego Park to the east. In 2003, South Elmhurst, an area between Eliot Avenue and the Long Island Expressway, was reassigned from Elmhurst's ZIP code
ZIP code
of 11373 to Middle Village's ZIP code
ZIP code
of 11379
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Borough (New York City)
New York City
New York City
encompasses five different county-level administrative divisions called boroughs: Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island. All boroughs are part of New York City, and each of the boroughs is coextensive with a respective county, the primary administrative subdivision within New York State. The Bronx
The Bronx
and Queens are concurrent with the counties of the same name, while Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island
Staten Island
correspond to New York, Kings, and Richmond Counties respectively. Boroughs have existed since the consolidation of the city in 1898, when the city and each borough assumed their current boundaries. However, the boroughs have not always been coextensive with their respective counties
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SS General Slocum
The PS General Slocum[notes 1] was a sidewheel passenger steamboat built in Brooklyn, New York, in 1891. During her service history, she was involved in a number of mishaps, including multiple groundings and collisions. On June 15, 1904, General Slocum caught fire and sank in the East River of New York City.[1] At the time of the accident, she was on a chartered run carrying members of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church ( German Americans
German Americans
from Little Germany, Manhattan) to a church picnic. An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died.[2] The General Slocum disaster was the New York area's worst disaster in terms of loss of life until the September 11, 2001 attacks
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Brooklyn Bridge
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge
Bridge
is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest roadway bridges in the United States. Started in 1869 and completed fourteen years later in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan
Manhattan
and Brooklyn, spanning the East River. It has a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m) and was the first steel-wire suspension bridge constructed. It was originally called the New York and Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge
Bridge
and the East River
East River
Bridge, but it was later dubbed the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, a name coming from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Daily Eagle[8] and formally so named by the city government in 1915
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Mass Grave
A mass grave is a grave containing multiple human corpses, which may or may not be identified prior to burial. The United Nations
United Nations
has defined a criminal mass grave as a burial site containing three or more victims of execution.[1] Mass graves are usually created after a large number of people die or are killed, and there is a desire to bury the corpses quickly for sanitation concerns
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The Bronx
The Bronx
The Bronx
(/brɒŋks/) is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City within the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of Queens, across the East River. Since 1914, the borough has had the same boundaries as Bronx County, the third-most densely populated county in the United States.[2] The Bronx
The Bronx
has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,471,160 in 2017.[1] Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density.[2] It is the only borough predominantly on the U.S. mainland. The Bronx
The Bronx
is divided by the Bronx River
Bronx River
into a hillier section in the west, and a flatter eastern section
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City
City
borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint to the north; Bedford–Stuyvesant to the south; Bushwick, East Williamsburg, and Ridgewood, Queens
Ridgewood, Queens
to the east; and Fort Greene and the East River
East River
to the west. Part of Brooklyn Community Board 1, the neighborhood is served in the south by the NYPD's 90th Precinct[4] and in the north by the 94th Precinct.[5] On the New York City
City
Council, the western and southern parts of the neighborhood are represented by the 33rd District; and its eastern part by the 34th District.[6][7] As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, the neighborhood's population is 32,926, an increase of 2.0% from 2000.[8] Since the late 1990s, Williamsburg has undergone gentrification characterized by hipster culture, a contemporary art scene, and vibrant nightlife
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Gravestone
A headstone, tombstone, or gravestone is a stele or marker, usually stone, that is placed over a grave. They are traditional for burials in the Christian, Jewish and Muslim religions, among others. In most cases they have the deceased's name, date of birth, and date of death inscribed on them, along with a personal message, or prayer, but they may contain pieces of funerary art, especially details in stone relief. In many parts of Europe insetting a photograph of the deceased in a frame is very common.Contents1 Use 2 Materials2.1 Stone 2.2 Metal, wood and plants3 Inscriptions 4 Form and decoration 5 Safety 6 Image gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksUse[edit] Marble
Marble
headstone of a couple buried together in Singapore, showing an arched emblem, signifying the reunification with one's partner in heaven
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Syracuse, New York
Syracuse (locally /ˈsɛrəkjuːs/) is a city in and the county seat of Onondaga County, New York, in the United States. It is the largest U.S. city with the name "Syracuse", and is the fifth most populous city in the state of New York following New York City, Buffalo, Rochester, and Yonkers. At the 2010 census, the city population was 145,252, and its metropolitan area had a population of 662,577. It is the economic and educational hub of Central New York, a region with over one million inhabitants. Syracuse is also well-provided with convention sites, with a downtown convention complex. Syracuse was named after the original Greek city Syracuse (Siracusa in Italian), a city on the eastern coast of the Italian island of Sicily. The city has functioned as a major crossroads over the last two centuries, first between the Erie Canal
Erie Canal
and its branch canals, then of the railway network
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Marilyn Yalom
Marilyn Yalom (born 1932) is a feminist author and historian. She is a senior scholar at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University.[1][2] She served as the institute's director from 1984 to 1985.[3] Marilyn Yalom has an extensive list of scholarly publications, including Blood Sisters (1993), A History of the Breast (1997), A History of the Wife (2001), Birth of the Chess Queen (2004), The American Resting Place (2008) with photos by Reid Yalom, and How the French Invented Love (2012). Her books have been translated into 20 languages. In addition to her text, The American Resting Place contains a portfolio of 64 black and white art photos taken by her son Reid Yalom
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New York Legislature
Majority caucus (104)     Democratic (103)      Independence (1)Minority caucus (37)     Republican (37)Vacant (9)     Vacant (9)Political groupsMajority caucus (32)     Republican (31)      Democrat Caucusing with Republicans (1)Minority caucus (29)     Democratic (29)Vacant (2)     Vacant (2)Salary $79,000ElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Meeting placeNew York State Capitol, AlbanyWebsitepublic.leginfo.state.ny.us www.assembly.state.ny.usNew York State Legislature
Legislature
are the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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