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Rule Egoism
Rule egoism is the doctrine under which an individual evaluates the optimal set of rules according to whether conformity to those rules bring the most benefit to himself.[1] See also[edit]Enlightened self-interest Ethical egoism Psychological egoism Rational egoism Rule utilitarianism Virtue ethicsReferences[edit]^ Kagan, Shelly. 1998. Normative Ethics
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Enlightened Self-interest
Enlightened self-interest is a philosophy in ethics which states that persons who act to further the interests of others (or the interests of the group or groups to which they belong), ultimately serve their own self-interest.[1][2][3] It has often been simply expressed by the belief that an individual, group, or even a commercial entity will "do well by doing good".[4][5][6]Contents1 Related and contrasting concepts1.1 Unenlightened self-interest 1.2 Golden Rule 1.3 Deferred gratification 1.4 Altruism 1.5 Rational selfishness2 See also 3 Notes and references 4 External linksRelated and contrasting concepts[edit] Unenlightened self-interest[edit] In contrast to enlightened self-interest is simple greed or the concept of "unenlightened self-interest",
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Ethical Egoism
Ethical egoism is the normative ethical position that moral agents ought to do what is in their own self-interest. It differs from psychological egoism, which claims that people can only act in their self-interest. Ethical egoism also differs from rational egoism, which holds that it is rational to act in one's self-interest.[1] Ethical egoism holds, therefore, that actions whose consequences will benefit the doer can be considered ethical in this sense. Ethical egoism contrasts with ethical altruism, which holds that moral agents have an obligation to help others. Egoism and altruism both contrast with ethical utilitarianism, which holds that a moral agent should treat one's self (also known as the subject) with no higher regard than one has for others (as egoism does, by elevating self-interests and "the self" to a status not granted to others)
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Psychological Egoism
Psychological egoism is the view that humans are always motivated by self-interest, even in what seem to be acts of altruism. It claims that, when people choose to help others, they do so ultimately because of the personal benefits that they themselves expect to obtain, directly or indirectly, from doing so. This is a descriptive rather than normative view, since it only makes claims about how things are, not how they ought to be. It is, however, related to several other normative forms of egoism, such as ethical egoism and rational egoism. A specific form of psychological egoism is psychological hedonism, the view that the ultimate motive for all voluntary human action is the desire to experience pleasure or to avoid pain
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Rational Egoism
Rational egoism (also called rational selfishness) is the principle that an action is rational if and only if it maximizes one's self-interest.[1] The view is a normative form of egoism
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Virtue Ethics
Virtue
Virtue
ethics (or aretaic ethics[1] /ˌærəˈteɪ.ɪk/, from Greek ἀρετή (arete)) are normative ethical theories which emphasize virtues of mind and character. Virtue
Virtue
ethicists discuss the nature and definition of virtues and other related problems
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Rule Utilitarianism
Rule utilitarianism is a form of utilitarianism that says an action is right as it conforms to a rule that leads to the greatest good, or that "the rightness or wrongness of a particular action is a function of the correctness of the rule of which it is an instance".[1] Philosophers Richard Brandt and Brad Hooker are major proponents of such approach. For rule utilitarians, the correctness of a rule is determined by the amount of good it brings about when followed. In contrast, act utilitarians judge an act in terms of the consequences of that act alone (such as stopping at a red light), rather than judging whether it faithfully adhered to the rule of which it was an instance (such as, "always stop at red lights")
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Rule Egoism
Rule egoism is the doctrine under which an individual evaluates the optimal set of rules according to whether conformity to those rules bring the most benefit to himself.[1] See also[edit]Enlightened self-interest Ethical egoism Psychological egoism Rational egoism Rule utilitarianism Virtue ethicsReferences[edit]^ Kagan, Shelly. 1998. Normative Ethics
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