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Getica
De origine actibusque Getarum (The Origin and Deeds of the Getae [Goths][n 1]),[1][2][3] commonly abbreviated Getica,[4] written in Late Latin by Jordanes in or shortly after 551 AD,[5][6] claims to be a summary of a voluminous account by Cassiodorus of the origin and history of the Gothic people, which is now lost.[7] However, the extent to which Jordanes actually used the work of Cassiodorus is unknown. It is significant as the only remaining contemporaneous resource that gives the full story of the origin and history of the Goths. Another aspect of this work is its information about the early history and the customs of the Slavs. CasCassiodorus was a native Italian (Squillace, Bruttium), who rose to become advisor and secretary to the Gothic kings in various high offices. His and the Goths' most successful years were perhaps the reign of Theodoric
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Ermanaric

Ermanaric (Gothic: *Aírmanareiks; Latin: Ermanaricus or Hermanaricus; Old English: Eormanrīc [ˈeormɑnriːtʃ]; Old Norse: Jörmunrekr [ˈjɔrmunrekr]; died 376) was a Greuthungian Gothic King who before the Hunnic invasion evidently ruled a sizable portion of Oium, the part of Scythia inhabited by the Goths at the time. He is mentioned in two Roman sources; the contemporary writings of Ammianus Marcellinus and in Getica by the 6th-century historian Jordanes. Modern historians disagree on the size of Ermanaric's realm
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Rogaland
Rogaland [ˈrûːɡɑlɑn] (listen) is a county in Western Norway, bordering the North Sea to the west, and counties Vestland to the north, Vestfold og Telemark to the east, and Agder to the east and southeast. The administrative centre of the county is the city of Stavanger, which is one of the largest cities in Norway. Rogaland is the center of the Norwegian petroleum industry
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Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water, located in western Eurasia.[a][2] Depending on the view, it can be classified as either the world's largest inland body of water (surpassing the Caspian Sea), or a marginal sea. It is supplied by major rivers, principally the Danube, Dnieper, Southern Bug, Dniester, Don, and Rioni. The watersheds of many countries drain into the sea beyond the six that share its coast.[3] The Black Sea covers 436,400 km2 (168,500 sq mi) (not including the Sea of Azov),[4] a maximum depth of 2,212 m (7,257 ft),[5] and a volume of 547,000 km3 (131,000 cu mi),[6] making it the world's largest inland body of water. Most of its coasts rapidly ascend. These rises are the Pontic Mountains to the south, bar the southwest facing peninsulas, the Caucasus Mountains to the east and the Crimean Mountains to the mid-north
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Norse Language
Old Norse, Old Nordic,[2] or Old Scandinavian was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 7th to the 15th centuries.[3] The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid-to-late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century.[4][
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Rye

Secale fragile M.Bieb.

Rye (Secale cereale) is a grass grown extensively as a grain, a cover crop and a forage crop. It is a member of the wheat tribe (Triticeae) and is closely related to barley (genus Hordeum) and wheat (Triticum).[1] Rye grain is used for flour, bread, beer, crispbread, some whiskeys, some vodkas, and animal fodder
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Old Norse
Old Norse, Old Nordic,[2] or Old Scandinavian was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 7th to the 15th centuries.[3] The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid-to-late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century.[4][
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Danube River

The Danube (/ˈdæn.jb/ DAN-yoob; known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second-longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire and today flows through 10 countries. The river runs through the largest number of countries in the world ( the Nile is second with 9 countries). Originating in Germany, the Danube flows southeast for 2,850 km (1,770 mi), passing through or bordering Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova and Ukraine before draining into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries. The Danube river basin is home to fish species such as pike, zander, huchen, Wels catfish, burbot and tench. It is also home to a large diversity of carp and sturgeon, as well as salmon and trout
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