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Ruger No. 1
Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc., better known by the shortened name Ruger, is an American firearm manufacturing company based in Southport, Connecticut
Southport, Connecticut
with production facilities also in Newport, New Hampshire, Mayodan, North Carolina, and Prescott, Arizona. The company was founded in 1949 by Alexander McCormick Sturm
Alexander McCormick Sturm
and William B
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Ruger (other)
Ruger may refer to: People[edit] Gaines Ruger Donoho
Gaines Ruger Donoho
(1857–1916), an American painter Karin Rüger-Schulze
Karin Rüger-Schulze
(1944–), a retired German track and field athlete who specialized in high jump Thomas H. Ruger
Thomas H. Ruger
(1833–1907), an American soldier and lawyer who served as a Union general in the American Civil War Werner Rüger, a German luger who competed in the late 1930s William Ruger (state senator) (d. 1843), New York politician William B. Ruger
William B. Ruger
(1916–2002), American firearms manufacturer William C. Ruger
William C

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Rimfire Ammunition
Rimfire is a method of ignition for metallic firearm cartridges as well as the cartridges themselves. It is called rimfire because the firing pin of a gun strikes and crushes the base's rim to ignite the primer. The rim of the rimfire cartridge is essentially an extended and widened percussion cap which contains the priming compound, while the cartridge case itself contains the propellant powder and the projectile (bullet). Once the rim of the cartridge has been struck and the bullet discharged, the cartridge cannot be reloaded, because the head has been deformed by the firing pin impact. While many other different cartridge priming methods have been tried since the 19th century, only rimfire technology and centerfire technology survive today in significant use. Frenchman Louis-Nicolas Flobert invented the first rimfire metallic cartridge in 1845
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Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°36′N 72°42′W / 41.6°N 72.7°W / 41.6; -72.7State of ConnecticutFlag SealNickname(s):The Constitution State (official) The Nutmeg
Nutmeg
State The Provisions State The Land of Steady HabitsMotto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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9mm
The 9×19mm Parabellum
9×19mm Parabellum
is a firearms cartridge that was designed by Georg Luger
Georg Luger
and introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer
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Luger P08 Pistol
The Pistole Parabellum—or Parabellum-Pistole (Pistol Parabellum), commonly known in the United States
United States
as just Luger[4]—is a toggle-locked recoil-operated semi-automatic pistol produced in several models and by several nations from 1898 to 1948. The design was first patented by Georg Luger
Georg Luger
as an improvement upon the Borchardt Automatic Pistol, and was produced as the Parabellum Automatic Pistol, Borchardt-Luger System by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM).[1] The first production model was known as the Modell 1900 Parabellum.[1] Later versions included the Pistol Parabellum Model 1908 or P08 which was produced by DWM and other manufacturers such as W+F Bern, Krieghoff, Simson, Mauser, and Vickers;[5] The first Parabellum pistol was adopted by the Swiss army in May 1900
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Colt Woodsman
The Colt Woodsman
Colt Woodsman
is a semi-automatic sporting pistol manufactured by the American Colt's Manufacturing Company
Colt's Manufacturing Company
from 1915 to 1977
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.22 Caliber
The 5.6 mm caliber or .22 caliber, is a small, extremely common size of ammunition, fitted to firearms with a bore diameter of 5.6 mm (0.22 in)
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Ruger Standard
The Ruger Standard
Ruger Standard
Model, also known as the Ruger Mark I, is a rimfire semi-automatic pistol introduced in 1949 as the first product manufactured by Sturm, Ruger & Co., and was the founding member of a product line of .22 Long Rifle
.22 Long Rifle
cartridge handguns. Its style is reminiscent of the German P08 Luger pistol, enhancing its appeal. It was marketed as an inexpensive .22 caliber rimfire intended for casual sport and target shooting, and plinking. Designed by company founder William B
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.22 LR
The .22 Long Rifle
Rifle
(metric designation: 5.6×15mmR) cartridge is a long-established variety of .22 caliber rimfire ammunition, and in terms of units sold is still by far the most common ammunition in the world today. The cartridge is often referred to simply as .22 LR ("twenty-two-/ɛl/-/ɑːr/") and various rifles, pistols, revolvers, submachine guns and even some smoothbore shotguns (No. 1 bore) have been manufactured in this caliber.Contents1 History 2 Popularity in the US 3 Performance 4 Variants4.1 Subsonic 4.2 Standard velocity 4.3 High velocity 4.4 Hyper-velocity 4.5 Shot cartridges 4.6 Full metal jacket 4.7 Tracer5 Cartridge construction 6 Cartridge length 7 Usage 8 Cartridge dimensions 9 Muzzle velocity
Muzzle velocity
(nominal) 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] American firearms manufacturer J
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Ruger 10/22
The Ruger 10/22
Ruger 10/22
is a series of semi-automatic rifles produced by American firearm manufacturer Sturm, Ruger & Co., chambered for the .22 Long Rifle
.22 Long Rifle
rimfire cartridge. It uses a patented 10-round rotary magazine, though higher capacity box magazines are also available. The standard Carbine
Carbine
version of the Ruger 10/22
Ruger 10/22
has been in production continuously since 1964,[2] making it one of, if not the, most successful rimfire rifle design in history, with numerous third party manufacturers making parts and accessories for upgrading and customization. In fact, the 10/22's aftermarket is so prolific, that a 10/22 can be built with completely non-Ruger made components. A magnum version of the 10/22, chambered for the .22 WMR
.22 WMR
cartridge, was made from 1998 to 2006
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Remington Arms
Remington Arms
Remington Arms
Company, LLC is an American manufacturer of firearms and ammunition in the United States. It was founded in 1816 by Eliphalet Remington
Eliphalet Remington
in Ilion, New York, as E. Remington and Sons. Remington is America's oldest gun maker and is claimed to be America's oldest factory that still makes its original product.[3] Remington is the largest U.S. producer of shotguns and rifles. The company has developed or adopted more cartridges than any other gun maker or ammunition manufacturer in the world. Until 2015, Remington Arms
Remington Arms
was part of the Freedom Group,[4] which is owned by Cerberus Capital Management
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Ruger MK III
The Ruger
Ruger
Mark III is a .22 Long Rifle
.22 Long Rifle
semi-automatic pistol manufactured by Sturm, Ruger
Ruger
& Company. It is the successor to the Ruger
Ruger
MK II, and includes several new features
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Ductile
Ductility
Ductility
is a measure of a material's ability to undergo significant plastic deformation before rupture, which may be expressed as percent elongation or percent area reduction from a tensile test. According to Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design--10th Ed. [1] significant denotes about 5.0 percent elongation (Section 5.3, p. 233). See also Eq. 2-12, p. 50 for definitions of percent elongation and percent area reduction. Ductility
Ductility
is often characterized by the material's ability to be stretched into a wire. From examination of data in Tables A20, A21, A22, A23, and A24 in Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design--10th Edition [1] for both ductile and brittle materials, it is possible to postulate a broader quantifiable definition of ductility that does not rely on percent elongation alone
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