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Ruff
Philomachus pugnax Tringa pugnaxThe ruff ( Calidris
Calidris
pugnax) is a medium-sized wading bird that breeds in marshes and wet meadows across northern Eurasia. This highly gregarious sandpiper is migratory and sometimes forms huge flocks in its winter grounds, which include southern and western Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australia. The ruff is a long-necked, pot-bellied bird. This species shows marked sexual dimorphism; the male is much larger than the female (the reeve), and has a breeding plumage that includes brightly coloured head tufts, bare orange facial skin, extensive black on the breast, and the large collar of ornamental feathers that inspired this bird's English name. The female and the non-breeding male have grey-brown upperparts and mainly white underparts
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Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Tryngites subruficollisThe buff-breasted sandpiper ( Calidris
Calidris
subruficollis) is a small shorebird. The species name subruficollis is from Latin
Latin
sub, "near to" and collum, "neck".[2] It is a calidrid sandpiper.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat2.1 In South Asia and Australia3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] This species is brown above, and has a buff face and underparts in all plumages. It has a short bill and yellow legs. Males are larger than females. Juveniles resemble the adults, but may be paler on the rear underparts.Standard Measurements[3][4]length 190–230 mm (7.5–8.9 in)weight 63 g (2.2 oz)wingspan 460 mm (18 in)wing 128.2–138.7 mm (5.05–5.46 in)tail 56.8–61.4 mm (2.24–2.42 in)culmen 19.9–21.3 mm (0.78–0.84 in)tarsus 31.8–34 mm (1.25–1.34 in)Distribution and habitat[edit]C
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Stoat
     native      introducedThe stoat (Mustela erminea), also known as the short-tailed weasel or simply the weasel in Ireland
Ireland
where the least weasel does not occur, is a mammal of the genus Mustela of the family Mustelidae
Mustelidae
native to Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America, distinguished from the least weasel by its larger size and longer tail with a prominent black tip
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Gull
11, see textFlying subadult silver gulls at Kiama beach, Sydney during Christmas 2013Gulls or seagulls are seabirds of the family Laridae
Laridae
in the suborder Lari. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae) and only distantly related to auks, skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until the 21st century, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now considered polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera.[1] An older name for gulls is mews, cognate with German Möwe, Danish måge, Dutch meeuw, and French mouette; this term can still be found in certain regional dialects.[2][3][4] Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls; stout, longish bills; and webbed feet
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Corvidae
See textDistribution map of the Corvidae.   Native   (Re)Introduced    Extinct
Extinct
(post-1500)    Extinct
Extinct
(pre-1500) Corvidae
Corvidae
is a cosmopolitan family of oscine passerine birds that contains the crows, ravens, rooks, jackdaws, jays, magpies, treepies, choughs, and nutcrackers.[1][2][3] In common English, they are known as the crow family, or, more technically, corvids. Over 120 species are described
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Skua
See text.The skuas /ˈskjuːə/ are a group of seabirds with about seven species forming the family Stercorariidae and the genus Stercorarius. The three smaller skuas are called jaegers in American English. The English word "skua" comes from the Faroese name skúgvur [ˈskɪkvʊər] for the great skua, with the island of Skúvoy renowned for its colony of that bird. The general Faroese term for skuas is kjógvi [ˈtʃɛkvə]. The word "jaeger" is derived from the German word Jäger, meaning "hunter".[1][2] The genus name Stercorarius is Latin
Latin
and means "of dung"; the food disgorged by other birds when pursued by skuas was once thought to be excrement.[3] Skuas nest on the ground in temperate and Arctic regions, and are long-distance migrants
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Forage
Forage
Forage
is a plant material (mainly plant leaves and stems) eaten by grazing livestock.[1] Historically, the term forage has meant only plants eaten by the animals directly as pasture, crop residue, or immature cereal crops, but it is also used more loosely to include similar plants cut for fodder and carried to the animals, especially as hay or silage.[2] The term forage fish refers to small schooling fish that are preyed on by larger aquatic animals.[3] While the term forage has a broad definition, the term forage crop is used to define crops, annual or biennial, which are grown to be utilized by gr
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Rice
Rice
Rice
is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa
Oryza sativa
(Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima
Oryza glaberrima
(African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia
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Bird Conservation
Bird
Bird
conservation is a field in the science of conservation biology related to threatened birds. Humans have had a profound effect on many bird species. Over one hundred species have gone extinct in historical times, although the most dramatic human-caused extinctions occurred in the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
as humans colonised the islands of Melanesia, Polynesia
Polynesia
and Micronesia, during which an estimated 750-1800 species of bird became extinct.[1] According to Worldwatch Institute, many bird populations are currently declining worldwide, with 1,200 species facing extinction in the next century.[2] The biggest cited reason surrounds habitat loss.[3] Other threats include overhunting, accidental mortality due to structural collisions, long-line fishing bycatch, pollution, competition and predation by pet cats,[4] oil spills and pesticide use and climate change
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Agreement On The Conservation Of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds
The Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds, or African-Eurasian Waterbird Agreement (AEWA) is an independent international treaty developed under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme's Convention on Migratory Species. It was founded to coordinate efforts to conserve bird species migrating between European and African nations, and its current scope stretches from the Arctic to South Africa, encompassing the Canadian archipelago and the Middle East as well as Europe and Africa. The agreement focuses on bird species that depend on wetlands for at least part of their lifecycle and cross international borders in their migration patterns
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Systema Naturae
Systema Naturae
Systema Naturae
(originally in Latin
Latin
written Systema Naturæ with the ligature æ) is one of the major works of the Swedish botanist, zoologist and physician Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
(1707–1778) and introduced the Linnaean taxonomy. Although the system, now known as binomial nomenclature, was partially developed by the Bauhin brothers, Gaspard and Johann, 200 years earlier,[2] Linnaeus
Linnaeus
was first to use it consistently throughout his book. The first edition was published in 1735
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Natural History
Natural history
Natural history
is the research and study of organisms including animals, fungi and plants in their environment, leaning more towards observational than experimental methods of study. A person who studies natural history is known as a naturalist or natural historian. Natural history encompasses scientific research but is not limited to it, with articles nowadays more often published in science magazines than in academic journals.[1] Grouped among the natural sciences, natural history is the systematic study of any category of natural objects or organisms.[2] That is a very broad designation in a world filled with many narrowly focused disciplines
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Fox
Foxes are small-to-medium-sized, omnivorous mammals belonging to several genera of the family Canidae. Foxes have a flattened skull, upright triangular ears, a pointed, slightly upturned snout, and a long bushy tail (or brush). Twelve species belong to the monophyletic group of Vulpes
Vulpes
genus of "true foxes". Approximately another 25 current or extinct species are always or sometimes called foxes; these foxes are either part of the paraphyletic group of the South American foxes, or of the outlying group, which consists of bat-eared fox, gray fox, and island fox.[1] Foxes live on every continent except Antarctica. By far the most common and widespread species of fox is the red fox ( Vulpes
Vulpes
vulpes) with about 47 recognized subspecies.[2] The global distribution of foxes, together with their widespread reputation for cunning, has contributed to their prominence in popular culture and folklore in many societies around the world
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Blasius Merrem
Merrem may refer to:Meropenem, an antibiotic initially marketed under the trade name Merrem Blasius Merrem (1761–1824), German naturalist, zoologist, ornithologist, mathematician, and herpetologistThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Merrem. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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