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Rudra Singha
Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
(reigned 1696–1714), or Swargadeu Rudra Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰূদ্ৰ সিংহ Sorgodeu Rudro Xingho), was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom kingdom under whom the kingdom reached its zenith of power and glory. Rudra Singha, known as Lai before he became the king, was the son of the previous Ahom king Gadadhar Singha. An illiterate (probably dyslexic), he is best known for building a coalition of rulers in the region and raising a vast composite army against the Mughal Empire. He died on the eve of his march west from Guwahati. His father had to escape persecution by the previous Ahom king and his mother, Joymoti Konwari, was killed in royal custody. He established his capital at Rangpur.Silver rupee of Sukhrungphaa. The legends read: obverse: sri srimat swarga deva rudra simhasya sake 1622 and reverse: sri sri hara gauri padambuja madhu karasya
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Illiterate
Literacy
Literacy
is traditionally meant as the ability to read and write .[1] The modern term's meaning has been expanded to include the ability to use language, numbers, images, computers, and other basic means to understand, communicate, gain useful knowledge, solve mathematical problems and use the dominant symbol systems of a culture.[2] The concept of literacy is expanding in OECD
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Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
or Tej Singha was the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
from 1677 CE to 1679 CE. After deposing king Sujinphaa, Atan Burhagohain, the Prime-Minister of Ahom Kingdom, installed Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
in the throne. Sudoiphaa's reign witnessed the end of ministerial dictatorship of Atan Burhagohain and rise of Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom Viceroy of Guwahati
Guwahati
and Lower Assam, as the real authority behind the throne
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Supangmung
Supangmung
Supangmung
(reigned 1663–1670), also known as Chakradhwaj Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চক্ৰধ্বজ সিংহ), was an important Ahom king under whom the Ahom kingdom took back Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals following the reverses at the hands of Mir Jumla and the Treaty of Ghilajharighat. He is known for his fierce pride as an Ahom monarch.Contents1 Reign1.1 Ascension 1.2 Recapture of Guwahati 1.3 The Ideal Monarch 1.4 Death of King Chakradhwaj Singha2 See also 3 ReferencesReign[edit] Ascension[edit] Jayadhawaj Singha left no sons, so the Ahom nobles called in the Saring Raja and placed him on the throne. He was a cousin of the Jayadhwaj Singha, and a grandson of Suleng Deoraja, a previous Saring raja and the second son of Suhungmung
Suhungmung
(Gogoi 1968:448). The new monarch was named Supangmung
Supangmung
by the Deodhais
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Sunyatphaa
Sunyatphaa
Sunyatphaa
or Udayaditya Singha was the king of Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
from 1670 CE to 1672 CE. After his elder brother Swargadeo Chakradhwaj Singha died in the middle of Ahom-Mughal war, Udayaditya Singha succeeded to the throne. His reign witnessed the end of Ahom-Mughal war, which started during the reign of Chakradhwaj Singha, when the Mughal army led by Rajput prince, Raja Ram Singh I
Ram Singh I
of Amber, was decisively defeated by the Ahom forces led by Ahom commander Lachit Borphukan
Lachit Borphukan
in the Battle of Saraighat. The later part of his reign was characterized by the failure of military expedition against the Dafala tribes and the influence of Paramananda Sannyasi, a saintly figure from Brindaban, over Udayaditya Singha
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Suklamphaa
Suklamphaa
Suklamphaa
(1672–1674) or Ramdhwaj Singha was a king of the Ahom kingdom. His reign is known for the rise in power of Debera Borbarua and the beginning of a ten-year period of power struggles among high officials of the kingdom that saw quick changes in kings via court intrigues and internal armed conflicts.Contents1 Ancestry 2 Deposition of Udayaditya Singha 3 Accession to the throne 4 Reign4.1 Execution of Borgohain and Charing Raja and appointment of Debera as Borbarua 4.2 Expedition against the Chutiyas and Mishmis 4.3 Illness of Ramdhwaj and the Issue of succession 4.4 Dispute between Ramdhwaj and Debera5 Death 6 Legacy 7 Notes 8 ReferencesAncestry[edit] Ramdhwaj Singha was the third son of Namrupia Raja, the grandson of Sureng Deo Raja, great grandson of Ahom king Suhungmung
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Suhung
Suhung
Suhung
(reign 1674–1675 CE) was a king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
who ruled for a very short period. While most of the chronicles put the number of days of his reign as 20, in some chronicles the duration of his reign was shown as one month and fifteen days.[1] Suhung
Suhung
was installed as king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
by Debera Borbarua after the latter poisoned Ahom king Ramdhwaj Singha. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by his minister Debera Borbarua
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
(fl. 1675–1677) or Sur Singha was a Namrupiya king of the Ahom kingdom. Atan Burhagohain installed him on the throne after removing Debera Borbarua from power and deposing the previous king, Gobar Roja. Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
began his reign well with proper advice and support from Atan Burhagohain and other nobles. But soon, acting on the advice of his wife and other advisors, the king began to defy the authority of the Burhagohain, which resulted in a head-on collision between both sides. The king successfully defended the first onslaught of Atan Burhagohain's forces, but fell to the second, which was reinforced with troops from Guwahati. Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
was deposed and blinded
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Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
or Ratnadhwaj Singha was the king of the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
(now in northeast India) from 1679 CE to 1681 CE. He was only fourteen years of age when Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom viceroy of Guwahati and Lower Assam, raised him to the throne, after deposing the former king, Sudoiphaa. Due to his youth at the time of his accession, he was generally known as Lora Raja or the Boy-king. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by Laluksola Borphukan, who held the real authority behind the throne. The most notorious act which occurred during his reign was the mutilation of Ahom princes belonging to the Royal Ahom Dynasty
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Sutingphaa
Sutingphaa
Sutingphaa
(Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চুটিংফা) (1644–1648) was a king of the Ahom kingdom. He was sickly and had scoliosis, and thus was also known as noriya roja and kekura roja. He was often unable to attend to public duties and had to be carried in a palanquin. Ascension[edit] Sutingphaa
Sutingphaa
became the king after his brother, the erstwhile king, was deposed. He got in palace intrigues and was eventually deposed himself by his son Sutamla
Sutamla
and killed. Notes[edit]References[edit]Gait, Edward A (1906), A History of Assam, Calcutta This biography of a member of an Indian royal house is a stub
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Sunyeophaa
Sunyeophaa
Sunyeophaa
(1769–1780), also called Lakshmi Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ লক্ষ্মী সিংহ), was an Ahom king. Shortly after he was installed he became a captive of the rebels of the Moamoria rebellion for a few months but soon regained his kingdom. See also[edit]Ahom dynastyReferences[edit]Gogoi, Padmeshwar (1968), The Tai and the Tai Kingdoms, Guwahati: Gauhati University This biography of a member of an Indian royal house is a stub
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Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
(1780–1795), also Gaurinath Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গৌৰীনাথ সিংহ), was an Ahom king of the Ahom kingdom. He lost his capital Rangpur to the Moamoria rebellion and camped in the Nagaon and Guwahati region till Captain Welsh removed the rebels
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Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
(1818–19, 1833–1838) was the last king of Ahom kingdom in Assam. He was installed as king twice. First time, he was installed by Ruchinath Burhagohain in 1818 CE, after the latter deposed Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
from the throne. His first reign ended in 1819 CE, during the second Burmese invasion of Assam, when his forces were defeated and the Burmese reinstalled Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
on the throne. He along with Ruchinath Burhagohain continued their efforts to expel Burmese invaders, by seeking help from British and through armed struggle. After First Anglo-Burmese War, the British East India Company occupied Assam
Assam
from Bumese invaders
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Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
was installed as the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in 1821 CE, by the Burmese. He was more or less a puppet in the hands of the Burmese, who held the real power of administration. His reign witnessed Burmese atrocities on the people of Assam
Assam
and the attempts made by Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
and Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
to expel Burmese invaders
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Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
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