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Rubber
Natural rubber, also called India
India
rubber or caoutchouc, as initially produced, consists of polymers of the organic compound isoprene, with minor impurities of other organic compounds, plus water. Malaysia
Malaysia
and Indonesia
Indonesia
are two of the leading rubber producers. Forms of polyisoprene that are used as natural rubbers are classified as elastomers. Currently, rubber is harvested mainly in the form of the latex from the rubber tree or others. The latex is a sticky, milky colloid drawn off by making incisions in the bark and collecting the fluid in vessels in a process called "tapping". The latex then is refined into rubber ready for commercial processing. In major areas, latex is allowed to coagulate in the collection cup
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Aztec
Aztec
Aztec
culture (/ˈæztɛk/), was a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico
Mexico
in the post-classic period from 1300 to 1521, during the time in which a triple alliance of the Mexica, Texcoca and Tepaneca tribes established the Aztec
Aztec
empire. The Aztec people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Aztec
Aztec
culture is the culture of the people referred to as Aztecs, but since most ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
in the postclassic period shared basic cultural traits, many of the traits that characterize Aztec
Aztec
culture cannot be said to be exclusive to the Aztecs
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Latex
La TeX
TeX
(/ˈlɑːtɛx/ LAH-tekh or /ˈleɪtɛx/ LAY-tekh;[1] a shortening of Lamport TeX) is a document preparation system.[2] When writing, the writer uses plain text as opposed to the formatted text found in WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
("what you see is what you get") word processors like Microsoft Word, LibreOffice Writer
LibreOffice Writer
and Apple Pages. The writer uses markup tagging conventions to define the general structure of a document (such as article, book, and letter), to stylise text throughout a document (such as bold and italics), and to add citations and cross-references. A TeX
TeX
distribution such as TeX
TeX
Live or Mik TeX
TeX
is used to produce an output file (such as PDF
PDF
or DVI) suitable for printing or digital distribution
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Landolphia Kirkii
Landolphia kirkii (known as sand apricot-vine, rubber vine[1] or Kirk's landolphia[2]) is a species of liana from the Apocynaceae family that can be found in Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa.Contents1 Description 2 Systematics 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The leaves of Landolphia kirkii are oblong and sometimes ovate and can reach up to 9 centimetres (3.5 in) in length. They are glossy green coloured from above, and have a channeled midrib. They have 10-12 pairs of lateral veins, with a net-veining that is slightly raised just above the midrib, that is pubescent underneath. The inflorescence has many flowers, which are white or creamy-yellow coloured and have a diameter of 1 centimetre (0.39 in). The flowers also have a tube that is 3.5–4 millimetres (0.14–0.16 in) long
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Landolphia
Landolphia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Apocynaceae first described as a genus in 1806. They take the form of vines that scramble over host trees. Landolphia is native to tropical Africa.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Uses 3 References 4 External linksCharacteristics[edit] There are about fifty species of Landolphia in continental Africa and about fourteen more species in Madagascar. They are typically found in forest habitats in tropical West and Central Africa, scrambling over trees, but a few species are large shrubs. They have simple, glossy green leaves in opposite pairs, jasmine-like flowers with tubes and parts in fives, and hard-shelled, fleshy fruits with several seeds embedded in the pulp. After fruiting, the flower stem develops into a twisting tendril which branches near its tip.[2][3] Uses[edit] Members of this genus exude latex when the bark is damaged
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Continental Tire
A Continental tire
Continental tire
is an upright, external, mounted spare tire behind an automobile's trunk compartment. The term also describes a non-functional bulge that is stamped into the trunk lid or a cosmetic accessory to the rear of the car giving the impression of a spare tire mount.Contents1 Development 2 Models 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDevelopment[edit] The pre-mounted spare tire and wheel combination on early automobiles typically meant an external mounting. Early European sports cars had their spare tire attached on the back of the automobile since their trunk or storage space was often very small. The development of the enclosed trunk on automobiles meant the spare tire could be placed out of sight, but this arrangement used up valuable space for carrying luggage
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Euphorbiaceae
The Euphorbiaceae, the spurge family, is a large family of flowering plants. In common English, they are sometimes called euphorbias,[2] which is also the name of a genus in the family. Most spurges such as Euphorbia
Euphorbia
paralias are herbs, but some, especially in the tropics, are shrubs or trees, such as Hevea brasiliensis. Some, such as Euphorbia canariensis,[3]:206 are succulent and resemble cacti because of convergent evolution.[4] This family occurs mainly in the tropics, with the majority of the species in the Indo-Malayan region and tropical America a strong second. A large variety occurs in tropical Africa, but they are not as abundant or varied as in the two other tropical regions
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Family (biology)
In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major taxonomic ranks; it is classified between order and genus. A family may be divided into subfamilies, which are intermediate ranks above the rank of genus. In vernacular usage, a family may be named after one of its common members; for example, walnuts and hickory trees belong to the family Juglandaceae, commonly known as the walnut family. What does or does not belong to a family—or whether a described family should be recognized at all—are proposed and determined by practicing taxonomists. There are no hard rules for describing or recognizing a family, or any taxa. Taxonomists often take different positions about descriptions of taxa, and there may be no broad consensus across the scientific community for some time
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Spurge
Chamaesyce Esula Euphorbia Rhizanthium and see belowDiversityc. 2008 speciesSynonymsChamaesyce Elaeophorbia Endadenium Monadenium Synadenium PedilanthusEuphorbia as a small tree: Euphorbia dendroidesEuphorbia is a very large and diverse genus of flowering plants, commonly called spurge, in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). "Euphorbia" is sometimes used in ordinary English to collectively refer to all members of Euphorbiaceae (in deference to the type genus), not just to members of the genus.[1] Some euphorbias are commercially widely available, such as poinsettias at Christmas. Some are commonly cultivated as ornamentals, or collected and highly valued for the aesthetic appearance of their unique floral structures, such as the crown of thorns plant (Euphorbia milii)
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Resilience (materials Science)
In material science, resilience is the ability of a material to absorb energy when it is deformed elastically, and release that energy upon unloading. Proof resilience is defined as the maximum energy that can be absorbed up to the elastic limit, without creating a permanent distortion. The modulus of resilience is defined as the maximum energy that can be absorbed per unit volume without creating a permanent distortion. It can be calculated by integrating the stress–strain curve from zero to the elastic limit
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Stretch Ratio
Deformation in continuum mechanics is the transformation of a body from a reference configuration to a current configuration.[1] A configuration is a set containing the positions of all particles of the body. A deformation may be caused by external loads,[2] body forces (such as gravity or electromagnetic forces), or changes in temperature, moisture content, or chemical reactions, etc. Strain is a description of deformation in terms of relative displacement of particles in the body that excludes rigid-body motions. Different equivalent choices may be made for the expression of a strain field depending on whether it is defined with respect to the initial or the final configuration of the body and on whether the metric tensor or its dual is considered. In a continuous body, a deformation field results from a stress field induced by applied forces or is due to changes in the temperature field inside the body
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Colloid
In chemistry, a colloid is a mixture in which one substance of microscopically dispersed insoluble particles is suspended throughout another substance. Sometimes the dispersed substance alone is called the colloid;[1] the term colloidal suspension refers unambiguously to the overall mixture (although a narrower sense of the word suspension is distinguished from colloids by larger particle size). Unlike a solution, whose solute and solvent constitute only one phase, a colloid has a dispersed phase (the suspended particles) and a continuous phase (the medium of suspension)
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Palaquium Gutta
Palaquium
Palaquium
gutta is a tree in the Sapotaceae
Sapotaceae
family. It grows up to 40 metres (130 ft) tall. The bark is reddish brown. Inflorescences bear up to 12 flowers. The fruits are round or ellipsoid, sometimes brownish tomentose, up to 2.5 centimetres (1 in) long. The specific epithet gutta is from the Malay word getah meaning "sap or latex". The tree is a well-known source of gutta-percha latex. Habitat is lowland mixed dipterocarp, kerangas and limestone forests. P. gutta is found in Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore
Singapore
and Borneo.[2] References[edit]^ a b " Palaquium
Palaquium
gutta". The Plant
Plant
List. Retrieved 6 December 2013.  ^ Mohtar, A.P. Abang Mohd. (April 2002). " Palaquium
Palaquium
gutta (Hook.f.) Baill." (PDF). In Soepadmo, E.; Saw, L. G.; Chung, R. C. K. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak
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Manilkara
Manilkara
Manilkara
is a genus of trees in the family Sapotaceae. They are widespread in tropical and semitropical locations, in Africa, Madagascar, Asia, Australia, and Latin America, as well as various islands in the Pacific
Pacific
and in the Caribbean.[4] A close relative is the genus Pouteria. Trees of this genus yield edible fruit, useful wood, and latex. The best-known species are M. bidentata (balatá), M. chicle (chicle) and M. zapota (sapodilla). M. hexandra is the floral emblem of Prachuap Khiri Khan Province in Thailand, where it is known as rayan. M. obovata shares the vernacular name of African pear with another completely different species, Dacryodes edulis, and neither should be confused with Baillonella toxisperma, known by the very similar name, African pearwood. The generic name, Manilkara, is derived from manil-kara, a vernacular name for M
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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