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Royal Standard Of Thailand
The Royal Standard of Thailand (Thai: ธงมหาราช Thong Maharat) is the official flag of the King of Thailand. The present form was adopted in 1910 under Vajiravudh (Rama VI), superseding the first Royal Standard created by Mongkut in 1855. In 1979, the designs were codified by law; specifically in Article 2 of the Flag Act of 1979 (พระราชบัญญัติธง พ.ศ. ๒๕๒๒), which also regulated Thailand's other flags. The standard is currently used by Maha Vajiralongkorn, also known as Rama X, since 2016. The Royal Standard consists of a bright yellow square with a red Royal Garuda at the center. The mythical Hindu and Buddhist beast, the Garuda, is the national emblem and the official symbol or 'arms' of the King. The Garuda has been the symbol of the monarchy since Ayutthaya
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Great Crown Of Victory
The Great Crown of Victory (Thai: พระมหาพิชัยมงกุฎ; RTGSPhra Maha Phichai Mongkut) is one of the regalia of Thailand. Made of gold and enamelled in red and green during the reign of King Rama I in 1782, the crown is 66 centimeters (26 inches) high and weighs 7.3 kg (16 pounds). In the reign of King Rama IV, a set of diamonds was added to the crown. Also added was a large cut diamond from India to decorate the top of the crown, called the Great Diamond (พระมหาวิเชียรมณี Phra Maha Wichian Mani). The crown is of a distinctive Thai design, being a multi-tiered conical diadem, terminating in a tapering spire. The crown is worn only when a king is crowned. He places the crown on his own head. The shape of the crown represents the concept of divine monarchy
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White Elephant

The term derives from the sacred white elephants kept by Southeast Asian monarchs in Burma, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia.[2] To possess a white elephant was regarded (and is still regarded in Thailand and Burma) as a sign that the monarch reigned with justice and power, and that the kingdom was blessed with peace and prosperity. The opulence expected of anyone who owned a beast of such stature was great. Monarchs often exemplified their possession of white elephants in their formal titles (e.g., Hsinbyushin, lit. "Lord of the White Elephant" and the third monarch of the Konbaung dynasty).[3] Because the animals were considered sacred and laws protected them from labor, receiving a gift of a white elephant from a monarch was simultaneously a blessing and a curse
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