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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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Gresham College And The Formation Of The Royal Society
The Gresham College
Gresham College
group was a loose collection of scientists in England of the 1640s and 1650s, a precursor to the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London. Within a few years of the granting of a charter to the Royal Society in 1662, its earlier history was being written and its roots contested. There is still some debate about the effect of other groups on the way the Royal Society
Royal Society
came into being. The composition of those other groups is unclear in parts; and the overall historiography of the early Royal Society
Royal Society
is still often regarded as problematic
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Arundel House
Coordinates: 51°30′43″N 0°6′51″W / 51.51194°N 0.11417°W / 51.51194; -0.11417Engraving of the west range of the stableyard ("aula") of Arundel House by Adam Bierling, 1646, after a drawing by its tenant Wenceslas Hollar Arundel House
Arundel House
was a London town-house or palace located between the Strand and the River Thames, near St Clement Danes. It was originally the town house of the Bishops of Bath and Wells, during the Middle Ages. In 1539 it was given to William Fitzwilliam, Earl of Southampton. It reverted to the Crown on Fitzwilliam's death and was granted in 1545 to Thomas Seymour, brother to Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Protector (of the infant King Edward VI, son of King Henry VIII)
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Melchisédech Thévenot
Melchisédech (or Melchisédec) Thévenot (c. 1620 – 29 October 1692) was a French author, scientist, traveler, cartographer, orientalist, inventor, and diplomat. He was the inventor of the spirit level and is also famous for his popular 1696 book The Art of Swimming, one of the first books on the subject and widely read during the 18th century (Benjamin Franklin, an avid swimmer in his youth, is known to have read it). The book popularized the breaststroke (see History of swimming). He also influenced the founding of the Académie Royale des Sciences (the French Academy of Sciences).Contents1 Life 2 Scientific studies 3 Other works 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Thévenot came from a family of royal office holders (nobles of the robe), which partly explains his wealth. He was reputed to speak English, Greek, Latin, Hebrew, and several oriental languages, including Arabic and Turkish
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Montmor Academy
Henri Louis Habert de Montmor
Henri Louis Habert de Montmor
(c. 1600, Paris
Paris
– 21 January 1679, Paris) was a French scholar and man of letters.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Cousin to Philippe Habert and Germain Habert, he became conseiller du roi aged 25, then in 1632 rose to become maître des requêtes, a post he gained thanks to the fortune of his father, treasurer extraordinary for war and treasurer of savings. He married Henriette-Marie de Buade, sister of Louis de Buade de Frontenac, future governor of New France. He attended on Marie de Gournay and wrote Latin epigrams
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Bodleian Library
The Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
(/ˈbɒdliən, bɒdˈliːən/) is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. With over 12 million items,[1] it is the second-largest library in Britain after the British Library
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Scientific Method
The scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge.[2] To be termed scientific, a method of inquiry is commonly based on empirical or measurable evidence subject to specific principles of reasoning.[3] The Oxford Dictionaries Online defines the scientific method as "a method or procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification of hypotheses".[4] Experiments are a procedure designed to test hypotheses. Experiments are an important tool of the scientific method.[5][6] The method is a continuous process that begins with observations about the natural world. People are naturally inquisitive, so they often come up with questions about things they see or hear, and they often develop ideas or hypotheses about why things are the way they are
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Magdalene College, Cambridge
Coordinates: 52°12′37″N 0°6′58″E / 52.21028°N 0.11611°E / 52.21028; 0.11611Magdalene CollegeCambridge UniversityThe Second Court of Magdalene College                     Location Magdalene Street
Magdalene Street
(map)Full name The College of Saint Mary MagdaleneMotto Garde ta Foy (Old French)Motto in English Keep your faithFounders John Lytlington,
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Francis Tallents
Francis Tallents
Francis Tallents
(1619–1708) was a non-conforming English Presbyterian
Presbyterian
clergyman.Contents1 Background, early life and education 2 Academic life and ordination 3 Minister at Shrewsbury 4 Ejection 5 Ejected minister 6 Shrewsbury Academy 7 Death 8 Works 9 Family 10 Works 11 Notes 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksBackground, early life and education[edit] Francis Tallents
Francis Tallents
was of partly Huguenot
Huguenot
ancestry.[1] He was the eldest son of Philip Tallents, whose own father, a Frenchman, accompanied Francis Leke (MP), a Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Protestant politician and soldier,[2] to England
England
after saving his life. Francis Tallents
Francis Tallents
was born at Pilsley in the parish of North Wingfield, Derbyshire, in November 1619
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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Huguenot
Huguenots
Huguenots
(/ˈhjuːɡənɒt, -noʊ/; French: Les huguenots [yɡ(ə)no]) are an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants
Protestants
who follow the Reformed
Reformed
tradition. The term was used frequently to describe members of the Reformed Church of France
France
from the early 1500s until around 1800. The term has its origin in France. Huguenots
Huguenots
were French Protestants mainly from northern France, who were inspired by the writings of theologians in the early 1500s, and who endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard
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Coat Of Arms
A coat of arms is an heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto
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Masque
The masque was a form of festive courtly entertainment that flourished in 16th- and early 17th-century Europe, though it was developed earlier in Italy, in forms including the intermedio (a public version of the masque was the pageant). A masque involved music and dancing, singing and acting, within an elaborate stage design, in which the architectural framing and costumes might be designed by a renowned architect, to present a deferential allegory flattering to the patron. Professional actors and musicians were hired for the speaking and singing parts. Often the masquers, who did not speak or sing, were courtiers: the English queen Anne of Denmark
Anne of Denmark
frequently danced with her ladies in masques between 1603 and 1611, and Henry VIII and Charles I of England
Charles I of England
performed in the masques at their courts
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Ben Jonson
Benjamin Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637[2]) was an English playwright, poet, actor, and literary critic, whose artistry exerted a lasting impact upon English poetry and stage comedy. He popularised the comedy of humours. He is best known for the satirical plays Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone, or The Fox (c
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The Fortunate Isles And Their Union
The Fortunate Isles and Their Union is a Jacobean era masque, written by Ben Jonson and designed by Inigo Jones, and performed on 9 January 1625. It was the last masque acted before King James I, (who died two months later on 27 March), and therefore the final masque of the Jacobean era.Contents1 The show 2 Sources 3 Publication 4 Notes 5 ReferencesThe show[edit] The masque had, as its theme, the vision of a unified British kingdom under the guidance of a wise king
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