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Royal College Of Art
The Royal College of Art
Art
(RCA) is a public research university in London, in the United Kingdom
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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Photography
Photography
Photography
is the science, art, application and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film.[1] Typically, a lens is used to focus the light reflected or emitted from objects into a real image on the light-sensitive surface inside a camera during a timed exposure. With an electronic image sensor, this produces an electrical charge at each pixel, which is electronically processed and stored in a digital image file for subsequent display or processing. The result with photographic emulsion is an invisible latent image, which is later chemically "developed" into a visible image, either negative or positive depending on the purpose of the photographic material and the method of processing
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Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organisations such as cities (with municipal charters) or universities and learned societies. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and letters of appointment, as they have perpetual effect. Typically, a Royal Charter is produced as a high-quality work of calligraphy on vellum. The British monarchy has issued over 980 royal charters.[1] Of these about 750 remain in existence. The earliest was to the town of Tain
Tain
in 1066, making it the oldest Royal Burgh in Scotland, followed by the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
in 1231
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Battersea
Battersea
Battersea
is a district of south west London, England, within the London
London
Borough of Wandsworth
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Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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Sculpture
Sculpture
Sculpture
is the branch of the visual arts that operates in three dimensions. It is one of the plastic arts. Durable sculptural processes originally used carving (the removal of material) and modelling (the addition of material, as clay), in stone, metal, ceramics, wood and other materials but, since Modernism, there has been an almost complete freedom of materials and process
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Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Haworth Tompkins
Haworth Tompkins
Haworth Tompkins
was formed in 1991 by architects Graham Haworth [b. 1960] and Steve Tompkins [b. 1959]. Based in London, the studio works throughout the public, private and subsidised sectors on a wide range of building types including schools, galleries, theatres, housing, offices, shops and factories.[2] The practice employs circa 55 people.[3] Selected works[edit]The Young VicEveryman Theatre, Liverpool Complete rebuilding of the Everyman Theatre. Completed 2014. The Shed, London Temporary auditorium for the National Theatre on the South Bank. 2013–2014 only. North Wall, Oxford New theatre for St Edward's School
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Mortimer Sackler
Mortimer David Sackler (December 7, 1916 – March 24, 2010) was an American physician and entrepreneur. With his brother, Raymond, he used his fortune from Oxycontin, the trade name for oxycodone, an opioid pain medication used to treat terminal cancer patients, to become a prominent philanthropist.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Life and career 2 Marriage 3 Horticultural legacy 4 Death 5 Controversy 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksLife and career[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The son of Isaac and Sophie (née Greenberg) Sackler, Polish Jewish immigrant Brooklyn grocer, Sackler attended Erasmus Hall High School in his native Brooklyn
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Printmaking
Printmaking
Printmaking
is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. Printmaking
Printmaking
normally covers only the process of creating prints that have an element of originality, rather than just being a photographic reproduction of a painting. Except in the case of monotyping, the process is capable of producing multiples of the same piece, which is called a print. Each print produced is not considered a "copy" but rather is considered an "original". This is because typically each print varies to an extent due to variables intrinsic to the printmaking process, and also because the imagery of a print is typically not simply a reproduction of another work but rather is often a unique image designed from the start to be expressed in a particular printmaking technique. A print may be known as an impression
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Woo Po-shing
Sir Woo Po-shing, LLD, FCIArb, FIMgt, FInstD, FHKMA (born 19 April 1929) is a Hong Kong solicitor, entrepreneur, politician and philanthropist. Biography[edit] Woo was born on 19 April 1929 in Hong Kong to a wealthy family of Seaward Woo and Ng Chiu-man. He was educated at the La Salle College and King's College of London. He was admitted to practice as solicitor in England and in Hong Kong in 1960 and became Notary Public
Notary Public
in 1966. He founded the Woo Kwan Lee & Lo, Solicitors and Notaries in 1963 and was the consultant of the law firm
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Industrial Design
Industrial design
Industrial design
is a process of design applied to products that are to be manufactured through techniques of mass production.[2][3] Its key characteristic is that design is separated from manufacture: the creative act of determining and defining a product's form and features takes place in advance of the physical act of making a product, which consists purely of repeated, often automated, replication.[4][5] This distinguishes industrial design from craft-based design, where the form of the product is determined by the product's creator at the time of its creation.[6] All manufactured products are the result
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Anodizing
Anodizing
Anodizing
(spelled anodising outside USA) is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. The process is called anodizing because the part to be treated forms the anode electrode of an electrical circuit. Anodizing
Anodizing
increases resistance to corrosion and wear, and provides better adhesion for paint primers and glues than bare metal does. Anodic films can also be used for a number of cosmetic effects, either with thick porous coatings that can absorb dyes or with thin transparent coatings that add interference effects to reflected light. Anodizing
Anodizing
is also used to prevent galling of threaded components and to make dielectric films for electrolytic capacitors
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Master Of Arts
A Master of Arts
Arts
(Latin: Magister Artium; abbreviated MA; also Latin: Artium Magister, abbreviated AM) is a person who was admitted to a type of master's degree awarded by universities in many countries, and the degree is also named Master of Arts
Arts
in colloquial speech. The degree is usually contrasted with the Master of Science. Those admitted to the degree typically study linguistics, history, communication studies, diplomacy, public administration, political science, or other subjects within the scope of the humanities and social sciences; however, different universities have different conventions and may also offer the degree for fields typically considered within the natural sciences and mathematics
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Master Of Philosophy
The Master of Philosophy
Philosophy
(abbr. M.Phil. or MPhil, sometimes Ph.M.; Latin
Latin
Magister Philosophiae or Philosophiae Magister) is a postgraduate degree. In most cases, it is an advanced research degree with the prerequisites required for a Master of Philosophy
Philosophy
degree making it the most advanced research degree before the Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
( Ph.D.
Ph.D.
or D.Phil.).[1] An M.Phil. is in most cases thesis-only, and is regarded as a senior or second Master's degree, standing between a taught Master's and a Ph.D.[2] An M.Phil
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