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Royal Collection
The Royal Collection
Royal Collection
is the art collection of the British Royal Family and the largest private art collection in the world.[1][2] Spread among 13 occupied and historic royal residences in the United Kingdom, the collection is owned by Queen Elizabeth II[3] and overseen by the Royal Collection
Royal Collection
Trust, a branch of the Royal Household
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Pythagoras
Pythagoras
Pythagoras
of Samos
Samos
(US: /pɪˈθæɡərəs/,[2] UK: /paɪˈθæɡərəs/;[3] Ancient Greek: Πυθαγόρας ὁ Σάμιος, translit. Pythagóras ho Sámios, lit. ' Pythagoras
Pythagoras
the Samian', or simply Πυθαγόρας; Πυθαγόρης in Ionian Greek; c. 570 – c. 495 BC)[Notes 1][4] was an Ionian Greek
Ionian Greek
philosopher and the eponymous founder of the Pythagoreanism
Pythagoreanism
movement. His political and religious teachings were well-known in Magna Graecia
Magna Graecia
and influenced the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and, through them, Western philosophy. Knowledge of Pythagoras's life is largely clouded by legend and obfuscation, but he appears to have been the son of Mnesarchus, a seal engraver on the island of Samos
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James I Of England
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
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Charles I With M. De St Antoine
Antoine
Antoine
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃.twan]) is a French given name (from Latin
Latin
Antonius) that could mean beyond praise or highly praise-worthy
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English Restoration
The Restoration of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II
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Dutch Republic
The Hague
The Hague
(de facto)Languages Dutch, Zeelandic, West Flemish, Dutch Low Saxon, West FrisianReligion Dutch ReformedGovernment Confederative republicStadtholder •  1581–1584 William I (first) •  1751–1795 William V (last)Grand Pensionary •  1581–1585 Paulus Buys
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George III Of The United Kingdom
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738[c] – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain
King of Great Britain
and King of Ireland
King of Ireland
from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick- Lüneburg
Lüneburg
("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
before becoming King of Hanover
King of Hanover
on 12 October 1814
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Frederick Augusta Barnard
Sir Frederick Augusta Barnard KCH FRS (1 September 1743 – 27 January 1830) was principal librarian to George III during much of the British King's reign. Barnard developed the library collection systematically, seeking guidance from noted intellectuals including writer and lexicographer Dr. Samuel Johnson.[1]Contents1 Birth and parentage 2 Early career 3 The Royal Library 4 Catalogue 5 Later life 6 Family 7 References 8 BibliographyBirth and parentage[edit] Frederick Augusta Barnard was the son of John Barnard (†1773), a Gentleman Usher, Quarterly Waiter and Page of the Backstairs to Frederick, Prince of Wales
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Louis XVI Of France
Louis XVI (French pronunciation: ​[lwi sɛːz]; 23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793), born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France before the fall of the monarchy during the French Revolution. He was referred to as Citizen Louis Capet during the final weeks of his life. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, son and heir apparent of Louis XV, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin of France. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he assumed the title "King of France
France
and Navarre", which he used until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of "King of the French" until the monarchy was abolished on 21 September 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793. The first part of his reign was marked by attempts to reform France
France
in accordance with Enlightenment ideas. These included efforts to abolish serfdom, remove the taille, and increase tolerance toward non-Catholics
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Old Master
In art history, "Old Master" (or "old master")[1][2] refers to any painter of skill who worked in Europe before about 1800, or a painting by such an artist. An "old master print" is an original print (for example an engraving or etching) made by an artist in the same period. The term "old master drawing" is used in the same way. In theory, "Old Master" applies only to artists who were fully trained, were Masters of their local artists' guild, and worked independently, but in practice, paintings produced by pupils or workshops are often included in the scope of the term
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British Library
Coordinates: 51°31′46″N 0°07′37″W / 51.52944°N 0.12694°W / 51.52944; -0.12694British LibraryPictured from the concourseCountry United KingdomType National libraryEstablished 1973 (45 years ago) (1973) (1753)Location Euston Road London, NW1Branches 1 (Boston Spa, West Yorkshire)CollectionItems collected Books, journals, newspapers, magazines, sound and music recordings, patents, databases, maps, stamps, prints, drawings and manuscriptsSizeover 174,000,000 items 13,950,000 books[1] 824,101 serial titles 351,116 manuscripts (single and volumes) 8,266,276 philatelic items 4,347,505 cartographic items 1,607,885 music scores 6,000,000 sound recordingsLegal deposit Yes, as enshrined in the Legal Deposit Libraries
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John Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley
John Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley (c. 1533 – 1609) was an English aristocrat, who is remembered as one of the greatest collectors of art and books of his age.Contents1 Early life 2 Marriages 3 Custodian of Nonsuch Palace 4 Lumleian Lectures 5 Death 6 See also 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] John Lumley, born about 1533, was the grandson and heir of John, Lord Lumley
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King Charles I Of England
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart as the second son of King James VI of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations. Two years later, he married the Bourbon princess Henrietta Maria of France instead. After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative
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Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl Of Arundel
Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel
Earl of Arundel
KG (23 April 1512 – 24 February 1580) was an English nobleman, who over his long life assumed a prominent place at the court of all the later Tudor sovereigns, probably the only person to do so.Contents1 Court career 2 Marriage and children 3 Portraiture 4 References 5 External linksCourt career[edit]Henry FitzAlan, 18th centuryHe was the only son of William FitzAlan, 18th Earl of Arundel, and his second wife Anne Percy, daughter of Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland, and was named for Henry VIII, who personally stood as his godfather at his baptism. At 15, Henry FitzAlan became a page at the court of King Henry VIII. When he came of age, in 1533, he was summoned to Parliament as Lord Maltravers, a subsidiary title of his father, who was still alive
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Commonwealth
Commonwealth
Commonwealth
is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good.[dubious – discuss] Historically it has sometimes been synonymous with "republic". The noun "commonwealth", meaning "public welfare general good or advantage" dates from the 15th century. Originally a phrase (the common-wealth or the common weal – echoed in the modern synonym "public weal") it comes from the old meaning of "wealth", which is "well-being", and is itself a loose translation of the Latin res publica (republic). The term literally meant "common well-being". In the 17th century, the definition of "commonwealth" expanded from its original sense of "public welfare" or "commonweal" to mean "a state in which the supreme power is vested in the people; a republic or democratic state"
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Watercolours
Watercolor (American English) or watercolour (British English; see spelling differences), also aquarelle (French, diminutive of Latin aqua "water"), is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork. Aquarelles painted with water-soluble colored ink instead of modern water colors are called "aquarellum atramento" ( Latin
Latin
for "aquarelle made with ink") by experts. However, this term has been more and more passing out of use.[1][2] The traditional and most common support—material to which the paint is applied—for watercolor paintings is paper. Other supports include papyrus, bark papers, plastics, vellum, leather, fabric, wood and canvas
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