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Rowe Hessler
Rowe Hessler
Rowe Hessler
(born on February 27, 1991 on Long Island, New York) is a two-time former speedcubing U.S. Champion and runner-up World Champion as of 2011. He held the North American record for the average of 5 Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
solves almost continuously from 2009 to 2014, during which time the record dropped from 11.11 seconds to 8.27 seconds.[1] As of May 2014, his average of 8.27 seconds ranks him eleventh in the world.[2] Hessler is also known for his expertise in the 2x2x2 event, having set the former world record in 2009 with an average time of 2.45 seconds. In October 2009, he attended the World Championships in Germany and was crowned World Champion in the 2x2x2 event. World records[edit]Event Result Competition2x2x2 single 0.96 seconds U.S
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Long Island, New York
Coordinates: 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Long IslandNative name: Paumanok[1]Location of Long Island
Long Island
in New YorkGeographyLocation Atlantic OceanCoordinates 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Area 1,401 sq mi (3,630 km2)AdministrationUnited StatesState New YorkDemographicsDemonym Long IslanderPopulation 7,869,820 (2017)Pop
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Dodecahedron
In geometry, a dodecahedron (Greek δωδεκάεδρον, from δώδεκα dōdeka "twelve" + ἕδρα hédra "base", "seat" or "face") is any polyhedron with twelve flat faces. The most familiar dodecahedron is the regular dodecahedron, which is a Platonic solid. There are also three regular star dodecahedra, which are constructed as stellations of the convex form. All of these have icosahedral symmetry, order 120. The pyritohedron is an irregular pentagonal dodecahedron, having the same topology as the regular one but pyritohedral symmetry while the tetartoid has tetrahedral symmetry. The rhombic dodecahedron, seen as a limiting case of the pyritohedron, has octahedral symmetry. The elongated dodecahedron and trapezo-rhombic dodecahedron variations, along with the rhombic dodecahedra, are space-filling
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Octahedron
In geometry, an octahedron (plural: octahedra) is a polyhedron with eight faces, twelve edges, and six vertices. The term is most commonly used to refer to the regular octahedron, a Platonic solid
Platonic solid
composed of eight equilateral triangles, four of which meet at each vertex. A regular octahedron is the dual polyhedron of a cube. It is a rectified tetrahedron. It is a square bipyramid in any of three orthogonal orientations
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Icosahedron
In geometry, an icosahedron (/ˌaɪkɒsəˈhiːdrən, -kə-, -koʊ-/ or /aɪˌkɒsəˈhiːdrən/[1]) is a polyhedron with 20 faces. The name comes from Greek εἴκοσι (eíkosi), meaning 'twenty', and ἕδρα (hédra), meaning 'seat'. The plural can be either "icosahedra" (/-drə/) or "icosahedrons". There are many kinds of icosahedra, with some being more symmetrical than others
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Tetrahedron
In geometry, a tetrahedron (plural: tetrahedra or tetrahedrons), also known as a triangular pyramid, is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces, six straight edges, and four vertex corners. The tetrahedron is the simplest of all the ordinary convex polyhedra and the only one that has fewer than 5 faces.[1] The tetrahedron is the three-dimensional case of the more general concept of a Euclidean simplex, and may thus also be called a 3-simplex. The tetrahedron is one kind of pyramid, which is a polyhedron with a flat polygon base and triangular faces connecting the base to a common point. In the case of a tetrahedron the base is a triangle (any of the four faces can be considered the base), so a tetrahedron is also known as a "triangular pyramid". Like all convex polyhedra, a tetrahedron can be folded from a single sheet of paper
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Great Dodecahedron
In geometry, the great dodecahedron is a Kepler–Poinsot polyhedron, with Schläfli symbol
Schläfli symbol
5,5/2 and Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
of . It is one of four nonconvex regular polyhedra
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Truncated Icosahedron
In geometry, the truncated icosahedron is an Archimedean solid, one of 13 convex isogonal nonprismatic solids whose faces are two or more types of regular polygons. It has 12 regular pentagonal faces, 20 regular hexagonal faces, 60 vertices and 90 edges. It is the Goldberg polyhedron
Goldberg polyhedron
GPV(1,1) or 5+,3 1,1, containing pentagonal and hexagonal faces. This geometry is associated with footballs (soccer balls) typically patterned with white hexagons and black pentagons. Geodesic domes such as those whose architecture Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller
pioneered are often based on this structure
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Helicopter Cube
A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL
VTOL
(vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform. The English word helicopter is adapted from the French word hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix (ἕλιξ) "helix, spiral, whirl, convolution"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) "wing".[2][3][4][5] English language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "copter", "helo", "heli", and "whirlybird". Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight, with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61
Focke-Wulf Fw 61
being the first operational helicopter in 1936
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Cuboid
In geometry, a cuboid is a convex polyhedron bounded by six quadrilateral faces, whose polyhedral graph is the same as that of a cube. While mathematical literature refers to any such polyhedron as a cuboid,[1] other sources use "cuboid" to refer to a shape of this type in which each of the faces is a rectangle (and so each pair of adjacent faces meets in a right angle); this more restrictive type of cuboid is also known as a rectangular cuboid, right cuboid, rectangular box, rectangular hexahedron, right rectangular prism, or rectangular parallelepiped.[2]Contents1 General cuboids 2 Rectangular cuboid2.1 Nets3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeneral cuboids[edit] By Euler's formula the numbers of faces F, of vertices V, and of edges E of any convex polyhedron are related by the formula F + V = E + 2
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Panagiotis Verdes
Panagiotis Verdes
Panagiotis Verdes
is the Greek inventor of the 6x6x6, 7x7x7, 8x8x8 and 9x9x9 Twisty Puzzles. He has also worked on new designs of every Twisty Puzzle from 2x2x2 to 11x11x11.[1] Inventions[edit]The V-Cube 6
V-Cube 6
in solved stateThe V-Cube 7
V-Cube 7
in solved statePrior to Verdes's invention, the 6x6x6 cube was thought to be impossible due to geometry constraints. Verdes's invention uses a completely different mechanism than the smaller Rubik's cubes; his mechanism is based on concentric, right-angle conical surfaces whose axes of rotation coincide with the semi-axes of the cube.[1] The patents for the cubes were awarded in 2004, and mass-production began in 2008. Verdes's mechanism allows cubes of up to size 11x11x11, as larger cubes have geometrical constraints.[1] References[edit]^ a b c Slocum, Jerry (2009). The Cube: The Ultimate Guide to the World's Bestselling Puzzle
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Tony Fisher (puzzle Designer)
Fisher
Fisher
is an archaic term for a fisherman, revived as gender-neutral. Fisher, Fishers or The Fisher
Fisher
may also refer to: Fisher (animal)
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Rubik's Clock
Rubik's Clock
Rubik's Clock
is a mechanical puzzle invented and patented by Christopher C. Wiggs and Christopher J. Taylor.[1] The Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik
Ernő Rubik
bought the patent from them to market the product under his name. It was first marketed in 1988. Rubik's Clock
Rubik's Clock
is a two-sided puzzle, each side presenting nine clocks to the puzzler. There are four wheels, one at each corner of the puzzle, each allowing the corresponding corner clock to be rotated directly. (The corner clocks, unlike the other clocks, rotate on both sides of the puzzle simultaneously and can never be operated independently. Thus the puzzle contains only 14 independent clocks.) There are also four buttons which span both sides of the puzzle; each button arranged such that if it is "in" on one side it is "out" on the other
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Erik Akkersdijk
Erik Akkersdijk
Erik Akkersdijk
(born 7 October 1989 in Enschede, The Netherlands) is a Dutch Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
speedsolver. In 2008, he set several Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
world records. He started cubing in August 2005. He is globally known as one of the best speedcubers in the world
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Pyraminx Crystal
The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal is a dodecahedral puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube and the Megaminx. It is manufactured by Uwe Mèffert and has been sold in his puzzle shop since 2008. The puzzle was originally called the Brilic,[1] and was first made in 2006 by Aleh Hladzilin,[2] a member of the Twisty Puzzles Forum. It is not to be confused with the Pyraminx, which is also invented and sold by Meffert.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Number of combinations 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]White-bodied Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal with a star pattern applied to the faces.The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal was patented in Europe on July 16, 1987. The patent number is DE8707783U. In late 2007, due to requests by puzzle fans worldwide, Uwe Mèffert began manufacturing the puzzle. The puzzles were first shipped in February 2008
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Skewb Ultimate
The Skewb
Skewb
Ultimate, originally marketed as Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Ball is a twelve-sided puzzle derivation of the Skewb, produced by famous toy-maker Uwe Meffert. Most versions of this puzzle are sold with six different colors of stickers attached, with opposite sides of the puzzle having the same color; however, some early versions of the puzzle have a full set of 12 colors.Contents1 Description 2 Solutions 3 Number of combinations 4 See also 5 External linksDescription[edit] The Skewb
Skewb
Ultimate is made in the shape of a dodecahedron, like the Megaminx, but cut differently. Each face is cut into 4 parts, two equal and two unequal
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