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Rotation Music
In broadcasting, rotation is the repeated airing of a limited playlist of songs on a radio station or satellite radio channel, or music videos on a TV network.[1] They are usually in a different order each time. However, they are not completely shuffled, so as to avoid varying the time between any two consecutive plays of a given song by either too much or too little. Stations playing new music typically have a short rotation of around four hours, while stations playing "classics" may go as long as eight hours. College radio and indie radio stations sometimes have no particular rotation, only the music director's suggested lists for the disc jockeys, or are totally freeform radio. Broadcast automation systems handle a limited rotation quite well, in turn making voice tracking easy
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Heavy Rotation (other)
Heavy Rotation may refer to:Heavy rotation, in broadcasting, the repeated airing of a limited playlist of songs or music videos Heavy Rotation (Anastacia album) Heavy Rotation, a 2006 album by Deceptikonz Heavy Rotation (JKT48 album) "Heavy Rotation" (song), a song by AKB48 "Heavy Rotation", a song by Ciara from Basic Instinct "Heavy Rotation", a song by Soul Asylum from Hang TimeDisambiguation page providing links to articles with similar titles This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Heavy Rotation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Broadcast Automation
Broadcast automation
Broadcast automation
incorporates the use of broadcast programming technology to automate broadcasting operations. Used either at a broadcast network, radio station or a television station, it can run a facility in the absence of a human operator. They can also run in a "live assist" mode when there are on-air personnel present at the master control, television studio or control room. The radio transmitter end of the airchain is handled by a separate automatic transmission system (ATS).Contents1 History 2 Early analog systems 3 Modern digital systems3.1 Television4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Originally, in the USA, many (if not most) broadcast licensing authorities required a licensed board operator to run every station at all times, meaning that every DJ had to pass an exam to obtain a license to be on-air, if their duties also required them to ensure proper operation of the transmitter
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Recurrent Rotation
Recurrent rotation refers to a group of songs still frequently aired on a contemporary hit radio station several months or even years after the initial debut. It is also used to describe core songs in other radio formats as well. Most charts have special rules to determine when a song has become recurrent, at which point they are removed from current charts (such as the Billboard Hot 100) and placed on special "recurrent charts". Recurrent charts tend to be more static, with less week-to-week changes in popularity, than current charts. The Billboard charts include these lists:Hot 100 Singles Recurrents Hot 100 Recurrent Airplay Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Recurrents Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Recurrent Airplay Top 40 Adult Recurrents Hot Adult Contemporary Recurrents Hot Country RecurrentsSongs that survive in recurrent rotation typically form the basis of radio formats as years advance
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Beaver Hour
Canadian content (CanCon, cancon or can-con) refers to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) requirements, derived from the Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Act of Canada, that radio and television broadcasters (including cable and satellite specialty channels) must air a certain percentage of content that was at least partly written, produced, presented, or otherwise contributed to by persons from Canada
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Canadian Content
Canadian content (CanCon, cancon or can-con) refers to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) requirements, derived from the Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Act of Canada, that radio and television broadcasters (including cable and satellite specialty channels) must air a certain percentage of content that was at least partly written, produced, presented, or otherwise contributed to by persons from Canada
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Watershed (broadcasting)
In broadcasting, the watershed or safe harbour is one or more dayparts during which it is appropriate to broadcast programming aimed towards mature or adult audiences. In the same way that a watershed refers to the crest dividing two drainage basins, a broadcasting watershed generally serves as a dividing line in a schedule between family-oriented programs, and programs aimed at or suitable for a more adult audience, such as those containing objectionable content (including graphic violence, profane language, nudity, and sexual intercourse, or strong references to these themes without necessarily portraying them). In some countries, watersheds are enforced by broadcasting laws
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Retailing
Retail
Retail
is the process of selling consumer goods or services to customers through multiple channels of distribution to earn a profit. Retailers satisfy demand identified through a supply chain. The term "retailer" is typically applied where a service provider fills the small orders of a large number of individuals, who are end-users, rather than large orders of a small number of wholesale, corporate or government clientele. Shopping
Shopping
generally refers to the act of buying products. Sometimes this is done to obtain final goods, including necessities such as food and clothing; sometimes it takes place as a recreational activity. Recreational shopping often involves window shopping and browsing: it does not always result in a purchase. Retail
Retail
markets and shops have a very ancient history, dating back to antiquity
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Listener Fatigue
Listener fatigue
Listener fatigue
(also known as listening fatigue or ear fatigue) is a phenomenon that occurs after prolonged exposure to an auditory stimulus. Symptoms include tiredness, discomfort, pain, and loss of sensitivity. Listener fatigue
Listener fatigue
is not a clinically recognized state, but is a term used by many professionals. The cause for listener fatigue is still not yet fully understood
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Songs
A song, most broadly, is a single (and often standalone) work of music that is typically intended to be sung by the human voice with distinct and fixed pitches and patterns using sound and silence and a variety of forms that often include the repetition of sections. Written words created specifically for music or for which music is specifically created, are called lyrics. If a pre-existing poem is set to composed music in classical music it is an art song. Songs that are sung on repeated pitches without distinct contours and patterns that rise and fall are called chants. Songs in a simple style that are learned informally are often referred to as folk songs. Songs that are composed for professional singers who sell their recordings or live shows to the mass market are called popular songs. These songs, which have broad appeal, are often composed by professional songwriters, composers and lyricists
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Announcer
An announcer is a presenter who makes "announcements" in an audio medium or a physical location.Contents1 Television and other media 2 Radio 3 Live events 4 See also 5 FootnotesTelevision and other media[edit] Some announcers work in television production, radio or filmmaking, usually providing narrations, news updates, station identification, or an introduction of a product in television commercials or a guest on a talk show. Music television announcers were also called video jockeys (VJ). Announcers are often voice actors who read prepared scripts, but in some cases, they have to ad-lib commentary on the air when presenting news, sports, weather, time, and television commercials. Occasionally, announcers are also involved in writing the screenplay or scripts when one is required. Sometimes announcers also interview guests and moderate panels or discussions
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Voice Tracking
Voice-tracking, also called cyber jocking and referred to sometimes colloquially as a robojock, is a technique employed by some radio stations in radio broadcasting to produce the illusion of a live disc jockey or announcer sitting in the radio studios of the station when one is not actually present. It is one of the notable effects of radio homogenization.Contents1 Background 2 Variations 3 Formatics 4 Controversy 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Strictly speaking, voice-tracking refers to the process of a disc jockey prerecording his or her on-air "patter". It is then combined with songs, commercials, and other elements in order to produce a product that sounds like a live air shift. Voice-tracking
Voice-tracking
has become common on many music radio stations, particularly during evening, overnight, weekend, and holiday time periods
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Freeform Radio
Freeform, or freeform radio, is a radio station programming format in which the disc jockey is given total control over what music to play, regardless of music genre or commercial interests. Freeform radio stands in contrast to most commercial radio stations, in which DJs have little or no influence over programming structure or playlists. In the United States, freeform DJs are still bound by Federal Communications Commission regulations.Contents1 History in the United States 2 Freeform stations2.1 United States 2.2 Canada 2.3 Europe 2.4 Australia 2.5 New Zealand 2.6 Israel3 Freeform radio vs. eclectic radio 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory in the United States[edit] Many shows lay claim to be the first freeform radio program; the earliest is "Nightsounds" on KPFA-FM
KPFA-FM
in Berkeley, California, D.J.'d by John Leonard
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