HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Romanesque Art
Romanesque art
Romanesque art
is the art of Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the rise of the Gothic style in the 12th century, or later, depending on region. The preceding period is known as the Pre-Romanesque
Pre-Romanesque
period. The term was invented by 19th-century art historians, especially for Romanesque architecture, which retained many basic features of Roman architectural style – most notably round-headed arches, but also barrel vaults, apses, and acanthus-leaf decoration – but had also developed many very different characteristics. In Southern France, Spain
Spain
and Italy
Italy
there was an architectural continuity with the Late Antique, but the Romanesque style was the first style to spread across the whole of Catholic Europe, from Sicily to Scandinavia
[...More...]

"Romanesque Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Romanesque (other)
Romanesque may refer to:First Romanesque, or Lombard Romanesque architectural style Pre- Romanesque art
Romanesque art
and architecture, a term used for the early phase of the style
[...More...]

"Romanesque (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cistercian
A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (/sɪˈstɜːrʃən/,[1] abbreviated as OCist or SOCist (Latin: (Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), a religious order of monks and nuns. They are variously called the Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Bernard of Clairvaux
(though the term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland
Poland
and Lithuania), or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians
Cistercians
over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine
Benedictine
monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales
[...More...]

"Cistercian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maria Laach Abbey
Maria Laach Abbey
Abbey
(in German: Abtei Maria Laach, in Latin: Abbatia Maria Lacensis or Abbatia Maria ad Lacum) is a Benedictine abbey situated on the southwestern shore of the Laacher See
Laacher See
(Lake Laach), near Andernach, in the Eifel
Eifel
region of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Rhineland-Palatinate
in Germany. It is a member of the Beuronese Congregation
Beuronese Congregation
within the Benedictine Confederation
[...More...]

"Maria Laach Abbey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Val D'Aran
Aran (Occitan: [aˈɾan]; Catalan: [əˈɾan]; Spanish: [aˈɾan]) (previously officially called Val d'Aran) is an administrative entity in Catalonia, Spain, consisting of the Aran Valley, 620.47 square kilometres (239.56 sq mi) in area, in the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
mountains, in the northwestern part of the province of Lleida. This valley constitutes one of only two areas of contiguous Spain[1] (and the only contiguous part of current Catalonia) that are located on the northern side of the Pyrenees. Hence, this valley holds the only Catalan rivers to flow into the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
(for the same reason, the region is characterized by an Atlantic climate, instead of a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
one)
[...More...]

"Val D'Aran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catalonia
Catalonia
Catalonia
(Catalan: Catalunya, Occitan: Catalonha, Spanish: Cataluña)[c] is an autonomous community of Spain
Spain
located on the northeastern extremity of the Iberian Peninsula. It is designated as a nationality by its Statute of Autonomy.[d][7] Catalonia
Catalonia
consists of four provinces: Barcelona, Girona, Lleida, and Tarragona. The capital and largest city is Barcelona, the second-most populated municipality in Spain
Spain
and the core of the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union. Catalonia
Catalonia
comprises most of the territory of the former Principality of Catalonia
Principality of Catalonia
(with the remainder Roussillon
Roussillon
now part of France's Pyrénées-Orientales)
[...More...]

"Catalonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
[...More...]

"Spain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Cloisters
The Cloisters
Cloisters
is a museum in Fort Tryon Park
Fort Tryon Park
in Upper Manhattan, New York City specializing in European medieval architecture, sculpture and decorative arts, with a focus on the Romanesque and Gothic periods. Governed by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it contains a large collection of medieval art works set in architectural centerpieces sourced from French monasteries and abbeys. The buildings largely comprise of four cloisters—the Cuxa, Saint-Guilhem, Bonnefont and Trie cloisters— and a number of reconstructed Gothic chapels and halls. They were dismantled in Europe between 1934 and 1939, and rebuilt at the four-acre site in Washington Heights, New York, during a large-scale and complex project resulting from the acquisitions of the American sculptor and art dealer George Grey Barnard, implemented by the architect Charles Collens, and funded by the financier and philanthropist John D
[...More...]

"The Cloisters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
[...More...]

"New York City" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stained Glass
The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works created from it. Throughout its thousand-year history, the term has been applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches, mosques and other significant buildings. Although traditionally made in flat panels and used as windows, the creations of modern stained glass artists also include three-dimensional structures and sculpture. Modern vernacular usage has often extended the term "stained glass" to include domestic leadlight and objets d'art created from came glasswork exemplified in the famous lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany. As a material stained glass is glass that has been coloured by adding metallic salts during its manufacture. The coloured glass is crafted into stained glass windows in which small pieces of glass are arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead and supported by a rigid frame
[...More...]

"Stained Glass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Historiated Initial
A historiated initial is an initial, an enlarged letter at the beginning of a paragraph or other section of text, that contains a picture. Strictly speaking, a historiated initial depicts an identifiable figure or a specific scene, while an inhabited initial contains figures (human or animal) that are decorative only, without forming a subject. Both sorts became very common and elaborate in luxury illuminated manuscripts. These illustrated initials were first seen in the Insular art
Insular art
of the early 8th century. The earliest known example is in the Saint Petersburg Bede, an Insular manuscript of 731-46, and the Vespasian Psalter
Vespasian Psalter
has another.[1] The size and decoration of the initial further gives clues to both its importance and location. Letters that began a new section of a text or a particularly noteworthy section might receive more flourishes and space
[...More...]

"Historiated Initial" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cluniac
The Cluniac Reforms (also called the Benedictine Reform)[1] were a series of changes within medieval monasticism of the Western Church focused on restoring the traditional monastic life, encouraging art, and caring for the poor. The movement began within the Benedictine order at Cluny Abbey, founded in 910 by William I, Duke of Aquitaine (875–918).The reforms were largely carried out by Saint Odo
Saint Odo
(c
[...More...]

"Cluniac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High Relief
Relief
Relief
is a sculptural technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material. The term relief is from the Latin verb relevo, to raise. To create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane.[1] What is actually performed when a relief is cut in from a flat surface of stone (relief sculpture) or wood (relief carving) is a lowering of the field, leaving the unsculpted parts seemingly raised. The technique involves considerable chiselling away of the background, which is a time-consuming exercise. On the other hand, a relief saves forming the rear of a subject, and is less fragile and more securely fixed than a sculpture in the round, especially one of a standing figure where the ankles are a potential weak point, especially in stone
[...More...]

"High Relief" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carthusian
The Carthusian Order (Latin: Ordo Cartusiensis), also called the Order of Saint Bruno, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of enclosed monastics. The order was founded by Bruno of Cologne
Bruno of Cologne
in 1084 and includes both monks and nuns. The order has its own Rule, called the Statutes, rather than the Rule of Saint Benedict, and combines eremitical and cenobitic monasticism. The name Carthusian is derived from the Chartreuse Mountains; Saint Bruno built his first hermitage in the valley of these mountains in the French Alps. The word charterhouse, which is the English name for a Carthusian monastery, is derived from the same source.[1] The same mountain range lends its name to the alcoholic cordial Chartreuse produced by the monks since 1737 which itself gives rise to the name of the colour
[...More...]

"Carthusian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Goldsmith
A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with gold and other precious metals. Historically, goldsmiths also have made silverware, platters, goblets, decorative and serviceable utensils, ceremonial or religious items, and rarely using Kintsugi,[1] but the rising prices of precious metals have curtailed the making of such items to a large degree. Goldsmiths must be skilled in forming metal through filing, soldering, sawing, forging, casting, and polishing metal. The trade has very often included jewellery-making skills, as well as the very similar skills of the silversmith
[...More...]

"Goldsmith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Master Hugo
Master Hugo
Master Hugo
(fl. c.1130-c.1150) was a Romanesque lay and the earliest recorded professional artist in England. His documented career at Bury St Edmunds Abbey spans from before 1136 to after 1148. He is most famous for illuminating the first volume of the Bury Bible, which "have led to a general acknowledgement of Master Hugo as the gifted innovator of the main line of English Romanesque art".[1] This was made for the Abbey in about 1135, and is now in the Parker Library
Parker Library
of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge; it is not known whether he illuminated the second volume, of which only a small fragment is known to survive, now in a private collection in the USA. He is also recorded as making bronze doors for the western entry of the Abbey church, a great bell and a carved crucifix with figures of Mary and Saint John, for the Monk's Choir (probably a rood)
[...More...]

"Master Hugo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.