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Roman Rite
The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
(Ritus Romanus)[1] is the most widespread liturgical rite in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and is one of the Latin rites used in the Western or Latin Church. The Roman Rite
Roman Rite
gradually became the predominant rite used by the Western Church
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Adrian Fortescue
Fortescue is a prominent British family whose name was created from the Old Norman epithet Fort-Escu ("strong shield")
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Candle
A candle is an ignitable wick embedded in wax or another flammable solid substance such as tallow that provides light, and in some cases, a fragrance. It can also be used to provide heat, or used as a method of keeping time. A candle manufacturer is traditionally known as a chandler.[1] Various devices have been invented to hold candles, from simple tabletop candle holders to elaborate chandeliers.[2] For a candle to burn, a heat source (commonly a naked flame) is used to light the candle's wick, which melts and vaporizes a small amount of fuel (the wax). Once vaporized, the fuel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to ignite and form a constant flame
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Profession Of Faith
A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets. One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity
Christianity
is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament
New Testament
and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations.[1] The Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
is also broadly accepted
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Santa Cecilia In Trastevere
Santa Cecilia in Trastevere
Trastevere
is a 5th-century church in Rome, Italy, in the Trastevere
Trastevere
rione, devoted to the Roman martyr Saint Cecilia.Contents1 History 2 Art and architecture 3 List of Cardinal Protectors 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksHistory[edit] The first church on this site was founded probably in the 3rd century, by Pope Urban I; it was devoted to the young Roman woman Cecilia, martyred it is said under Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander
Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander
(A.D. 222-235). Tradition holds that the church was built over the house of the saint.[1] The baptistery associated with this church, together with the remains of a Roman house of the early Empire, was found during some excavations under the Chapel of the Relics. By the late fifth century, at the Synod of 499 of Pope Symmachus, the church is mentioned as the Titulus Ceciliae
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Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Incense
Incense
Incense
is aromatic biotic material which releases fragrant smoke when burned. The term refers to the material itself, rather than to the aroma that it produces. Incense
Incense
is used for aesthetic reasons, and in therapy, meditation, and ceremony. It may also be used as a simple deodorant or insectifuge.[1][2][3][4] Incense
Incense
is composed of aromatic plant materials, often combined with essential oils.[5] The forms taken by incense differ with the underlying culture, and have changed with advances in technology and increasing diversity in the reasons for burning it.[6] Incense
Incense
can generally be separated into two main types: "indirect-burning" and "direct-burning". Indirect-burning incense (or "non-combustible incense") is not capable of burning on its own, and requires a separate heat source
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Body Of Christ
In Christian theology, the term Body of Christ
Christ
has two main but separate meanings: it may refer to Jesus'
Jesus'
words over the bread at the Last Supper
Last Supper
that "This is my body" in Luke 22:19–20, or to the usage of the term by the Apostle Paul in 1 Corinthians 12:12–14 and Ephesians 4:1–16 to refer to the Christian Church. It may also refer to Christ's post-resurrection body in Heaven. There are significant differences in how Christians understand the term as used by Christ
Christ
at the Last Supper
Last Supper
and as developed in Christian theology
Christian theology
of the Eucharist
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Second Vatican Council
Four Constitutions: Sacrosanctum Concilium
Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) Lumen gentium
Lumen gentium
(Dogmatic Constitution on the Church)
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Genuflection
Genuflection
Genuflection
or genuflexion is the act of bending at least one knee to the ground. From early times, it has been a gesture of deep respect for a superior. Today, the gesture is common in the Christian religious practices of the Anglican
Anglican
Church,[1] Lutheran
Lutheran
Church,[2] Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church,[3] and Western Rite Orthodox Church.[4] The Latin
Latin
word genuflectio, from which the English word is derived, originally meant kneeling rather than the rapid dropping to one knee and immediately rising that became customary in Western Europe in the Middle Ages.Contents1 History 2 In Christianity2.1 In front of the Blessed Sacrament 2.2 Episcopalian practice3 During the Liturgy3.1 Other genuflections in the liturgy3.1.1 Tridentine Mass3.2 Genuflecting to a bishop4 Image gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]Capt
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Liturgy Of The Word
Liturgy
Liturgy
is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions. As a religious phenomenon, liturgy is a communal response to and participation in, the sacred through activity reflecting praise, thanksgiving, supplication or repentance. Ritualization may be associated with life events such as birth, coming of age, marriage, sex and death. It thus forms the basis for establishing a relationship with a divine agency, as well as with other participants in the liturgy. Methods of dress, preparation of food, application of cosmetics or other hygienic practices are all considered liturgical activities. Technically speaking, liturgy is a subset of ritual. When ritual is undertaken to participate in a divine act or assist a divine action, it is liturgy. If the ritual does not have this purpose it is not liturgy but only ritual
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Crucifix
A crucifix (from Latin
Latin
cruci fixus meaning "(one) fixed to a cross") is an image of Jesus
Jesus
on the cross, as distinct from a bare cross. The representation of Jesus
Jesus
himself on the cross is referred to in English as the corpus ( Latin
Latin
for "body").[1][2] The crucifix is a principal symbol for many groups of Christians, and one of the most common forms of the Crucifixion
Crucifixion
in the arts. It is especially important in the Latin
Latin
Rite of the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church, but is also used in the Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian, and Eastern Catholic
Catholic
Churches, as well as by many Lutheran[3][4] and Anglican churches
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Council Of Trent
The Council of Trent
Council of Trent
(Latin: Concilium Tridentinum), held between 1545 and 1563 in Trent, or Trento, in northern Italy
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Chalice
A chalice (from Latin
Latin
calix, mug, borrowed from Greek κύλιξ (kulix), cup) or goblet is a footed cup intended to hold a drink. In religious practice, a chalice is often used for drinking during a ceremony or may carry a certain symbolic meaning.Contents1 Religious use1.1 Christian1.1.1 The Holy Chalice 1.1.2 Holy Grail1.2 Unitarian Universalism 1.3 Wicca 1.4 Neo-Paganism 1.5 Rastafarian2 Poisoned chalice 3 Heraldry 4 Gallery 5 Other usage5.1 Québec 5.2 Czech Republic 5.3 The Balkans6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksReligious use[edit] Christian[edit] Fresco
Fresco
of a female figure holding a chalice at an early Christian Agape feast
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