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Rolling Stock
The term rolling stock in rail transport industry originally referred to any vehicles that move on a railway. It has since expanded to include the wheeled vehicles used by businesses on roadways.[1][2][3] It usually includes both powered and unpowered vehicles, for example locomotives, railroad cars, coaches, and wagons.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Overview 2 Code names 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Note that stock in the term is business related and used in a sense of inventory
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Stock Car Racing
Stock car racing
Stock car racing
is a form of automobile racing found mainly and most prominently in the United States
United States
and Canada, with Australia, New Zealand and Brazil[1] also having forms of stock car auto racing. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately 0.25 to 2.66 miles (0.4 to 4.3 kilometers). The world's largest governing body for stock car racing is the American NASCAR, and its Monster Energy
Monster Energy
NASCAR
NASCAR
Cup Series is the premier top level series of professional stock car racing
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Railway Post Office
In the United States, a railway post office, commonly abbreviated as RPO, was a railroad car that was normally operated in passenger service as a means to sort mail en route, in order to speed delivery. The RPO was staffed by highly trained Railway Mail
Mail
Service postal clerks, and was off-limits to the passengers on the train. In the UK and Ireland, the equivalent term was Travelling Post Office
Travelling Post Office
(TPO). From the middle of the 19th century, many American railroads earned substantial revenues through contracts with the U.S. Post Office Department (USPOD) to carry mail aboard high-speed passenger trains; and the Railway Mail
Mail
Service enforced various standardized designs on RPOs
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Telegraphese
Telegram style, telegraph style, telegraphic style or telegraphese[1] is a clipped way of writing that attempts to abbreviate words and pack as much information into the smallest possible number of words or characters. It originated in the telegraph age when telecommunication consisted only of short messages transmitted by hand over the telegraph wire. The telegraph companies charged for their service by the number of words in a message, with a maximum of 15 characters per word for a plain-language telegram, and 10 per word for one written in code. The style developed to minimize costs but still convey the message clearly and unambiguously. Related but distinct, is the historical practice of using abbreviations and code words to compress the meaning of phrases into a small set of characters for ease of transmission over a telegraph, a device for transmitting electrical impulses used for communications, introduced from 1839 onwards
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SMS Language
SMS
SMS
language, textese or texting language[1] is the abbreviated language and slang commonly used with mobile phone text messaging, or other Internet-based communication such as email and instant messaging. Three features of early mobile phone messaging encouraged users to use abbreviations:Text entry was difficult, requiring multiple key presses on a small keypad to generate each letter; messages were limited to 160 characters; and it made texting faster.Once it became popular it took on a life of its own and was often used outside its original context.Contents1 History1.1
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Great Western Railway Telegraphic Codes
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Head End Power Car
A head end power car is a rail car that supplies head end power (HEP). Since most modern locomotives supply HEP they are mostly used by heritage railways that use older locomotives, or by railroad museums that take their equipment on excursions.[1] Quite a few head end power cars started out as other forms of rolling stock that have been rebuilt with diesel generators and fuel tanks to supply HEP to the passenger equipment.[2][3] References[edit]^ "Nevada Southern Railway's website describing their head end power car".  ^ "Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad's description of their car's history and conversion"
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Mobile Post Office
Mobile post offices deliver mail and other postal services through specially equipped vehicles, such as trucks and trains.Contents1 Mobile Post Offices around the world1.1 United Kingdom 1.2 France 1.3 United States 1.4 Canada 1.5 Hong Kong 1.6 Israel 1.7 Pakistan 1.8 Other countries2 Postage stamps 3 Popular culture 4 References and sources 5 External linksMobile Post Offices around the world[edit] United Kingdom[edit] Main articles: Travelling Post Office
Travelling Post Office
and Post Office Sorting Van The
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Rail Yard
A rail yard, railway yard or railroad yard is a complex series of railroad tracks for storing, sorting, or loading and unloading, railroad cars and locomotives. Railroad yards have many tracks in parallel for keeping rolling stock stored off the mainline, so that they do not obstruct the flow of traffic. Railroad cars are moved around by specially designed yard switchers, a type of locomotive. Cars in a railroad yard may be sorted by numerous categories, including railroad company, loaded or unloaded, destination, car type, or whether they need repairs. Railroad yards are normally built where there is a need to store cars while they are not being loaded or unloaded, or are waiting to be assembled into trains. Large yards may have a tower to control operations.[1]:46 Many railway yards are located at strategic points on a main line. Main-line yards are often composed of an up yard and a down yard, linked to the associated railroad direction
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Bar Car
A bar car is a train car that has as its primary purpose the provision and consumption of alcoholic and other beverages.Contents1 In the United States1.1 Former services2 In Canada 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksIn the United States[edit] Bar cars were common during the heyday of U.S. rail travel prior to World War II. However, since May 2014 there are no bar cars left (not including Amtrak's full-service dining cars, lounges and café cars). Former services[edit] Metro-North Railroad has replaced the 1970s-era cars now used by commuters from Manhattan to Connecticut, with the new M-8 cars rolled out between 2010 and 2015
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Colonist Car
A colonist car (or emigrant car) was a type of railway passenger coach designed to provide inexpensive long-distant transportation for immigrants, mainly in North America. They were noted for very spartan accommodation. History[edit] Colonist cars were a solution to the challenge of North America settlement in the mid and late 19th century which saw the growth of settlement areas in the western interior of the continent, thousands of miles from the seaports where most immigrants arrived. Colonist cars began in the 1840s as the cheapest form of transport for immigrants who could only afford basic fares. At first they provided only benches around the side of what were often boxcars which could be converted to grain cars for return trips to the east coast.[1] Canadian Pacific Railway
Canadian Pacific Railway
colonist car No
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Compartment Coach
A compartment coach is a railway passenger coach (US: passenger car) divided into separate areas or compartments, with no means of moving between compartments.[1][self-published source?]Contents1 English origins 2 American corridor coach 3 Early compartment coaches3.1 Development in Prussia 3.2 Overview of Prussian eight-wheeled coaches 3.3 Development by the Deutsche Reichsbahn 3.4 Post-war development4 ReferencesEnglish origins[edit] Originally compartment coaches were passenger coaches with several separate compartments in the same coach body, each compartment having its own doors on the side of the coach to enable passengers to board and alight. The compartment coach was developed at the very beginning of the railway era in England simply by placing a post coach body on a railway undercarriage. Compartment coaches were used across almost the whole of Europe
Europe
and were built right up to the 1930s
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