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Rock Music
Rock music
Rock music
is a broad genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in the United States
United States
in the early 1950s, and developed into a range of different styles in the 1960s and later, particularly in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and in the United States.[1][2] It has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll, a style which drew heavily on the African-American genres of blues and rhythm and blues, and from country music. Rock music
Rock music
also drew strongly on a number of other genres such as electric blues and folk, and incorporated influences from jazz, classical and other musical styles. Musically, rock has centered on the electric guitar, usually as part of a rock group with electric bass and drums and one or more singers
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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New-age Music
New-age music
New-age music
is a genre of music intended to create artistic inspiration, relaxation, and optimism. It is used by listeners for yoga, massage, meditation,[1] reading as a method of stress management[2] to bring about a state of ecstasy rather than trance,[3][4] or to create a peaceful atmosphere in their home or other environments, and is associated with environmentalism and New Age spirituality.[5][1] New-age music
New-age music
includes both acoustic forms, featuring instruments such as flutes, piano, acoustic guitar and a wide variety of non-Western acoustic instruments, and electronic forms, frequently relying on sustained synth pads or long sequencer-based runs
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Electronic Keyboard
An electronic keyboard or digital keyboard is an electronic musical instrument, an electronic or digital derivative of keyboard instruments.[1] Broadly speaking, the term electronic keyboard or just a keyboard can refer to any type of digital or electronic keyboard instrument. These include synthesizers, digital pianos, stage pianos, electronic organs and digital audio workstations. However, an electronic keyboard is more specifically a synthesizer with a built-in low-wattage power amplifier and small loudspeakers. Electronic keyboards are capable of recreating a wide range of instrument sounds (piano, electric piano, Hammond organ, pipe organ, violin, etc.) and synthesizer tones with less complex sound synthesis. Electronic keyboards are usually designed for home users, beginners and other non-professional users. They typically have unweighted keys. The least expensive models do not have velocity-sensitive keys, but mid- to high-priced models do
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Electric Blues
Electric blues
Electric blues
refers to any type of blues music distinguished by the use of electric amplification for musical instruments. The guitar was the first instrument to be popularly amplified and used by early pioneers T-Bone Walker
T-Bone Walker
in the late 1930s and John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
and Muddy Waters in the 1940s. Their styles developed into West Coast blues, Detroit
Detroit
blues, and post- World War II
World War II
Chicago
Chicago
blues, which differed from earlier, predominantly acoustic-style blues. By the early 1950s, Little Walter
Little Walter
was a featured soloist on blues harmonica or blues harp using a small hand-held microphone fed into a guitar amplifier. Although it took a little longer, the electric bass guitar gradually replaced the stand-up bass by the early 1960s
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Post-punk
Post-punk
Post-punk
(originally called new musick[2]) is a broad type of rock music that emerged from the punk movement of the 1970s, in which artists departed from the simplicity and traditionalism of punk rock to adopt a variety of avant-garde sensibilities
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Folk Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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Country Music
Country music
Country music
(/ˈkʌntri/), also known as country and western or simply country, is a genre of popular music that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s.[1] It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music) and blues. Country music
Country music
often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms, folk lyric and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos, electric and acoustic guitars, steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros), and fiddles as well as harmonicas.[2][3][4] Blues
Blues
modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history.[5] According to Lindsey Starnes, the term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century
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Rhythm And Blues
Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated as R&B, is a genre of popular music that originated in the 1940s.[1] The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.[2] In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, one or more saxophones, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy,[3] as well as triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term "rhythm and blues" has undergone a number of shifts in meaning
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Indie Rock
Chillwave Chamber popSubgenresEmo math rock noise pop post-punk revival sadcore/slowcore shoegazingFusion genresAlternative dance alternative R&B grindie indie folk new raveOther topicsBritpop DIY ethic hipster jangle pop lo-fi noise rock post-rock timeline of alternative rock Indie rock
Indie rock
is a genre of alternative rock that originated in the United States
United States
and the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the 1980s. Originally used to describe independent record labels, the term became associated with the music they produced and was initially used interchangeably with "alternative rock". As grunge and punk revival bands in the US, and then Britpop
Britpop
bands in the UK, broke into the mainstream in the 1990s, it came to be used to identify those acts that retained an outsider and underground perspective
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Blues
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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Post-rock
Post-rock
Post-rock
is a form of experimental rock[3] characterized by use of rock instruments primarily to explore textures and timbre rather than traditional song structure, chords or riffs.[4] Post-rock
Post-rock
artists typically unify rock instrumentation with electronics,[3] and are often instrumental.[5][6][3] Although firmly rooted in the indie or underground scene of the 1980s and early 1990s, post-rock's style often bears little resemblance musically to that of contemporary indie rock, departing from rock conventions.[6] Elements may be borrowed from genres such as ambient music, krautrock, IDM, jazz, minimalist classical, and dub reggae.[3] Prominent post-rock groups include Sigur Rós, Explosions in the Sky, Mono, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Stereolab, Maybeshewill, Mogwai, Disco Inferno, and Tortoise, with individual styles between groups differing widely despite being centered on guitars and drums
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Vocals
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
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Bass Guitar
The bass guitar[1] (also known as electric bass,[2][3][4] or bass) is a stringed instrument similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four to six strings or courses. The four-string bass is usually tuned the same as the double bass,[5] which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lowest pitched strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds. It is played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, strumming, tapping, thumping, or picking with a plectrum, often known as a pick
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New Wave Music
New wave is a genre of rock music[2] popular in late 1970s and the 1980s with ties to mid-1970s punk rock.[18] New wave moved away from blues and rock and roll sounds to create pop music that incorporated disco, mod, and electronic music. Initially new wave was similar to punk rock, before becoming a distinct genre. It subsequently engendered subgenres and fusions, including synth-pop.[15] New wave differs from other movements with ties to first-wave punk as it displays characteristics common to pop music, rather than the more "artsy" post-punk.[19] Although it incorporates much of the original punk rock sound and ethos,[5][20] new wave exhibits greater complexity in both music and lyrics
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