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Rock County, Wisconsin
Rock County is a county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 160,331.[1] Its county seat is Janesville.[2] Rock County comprises the Janesville-Beloit, WI Metropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Madison-Janesville-Beloit, WI Combined Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Transportation3.1 Major highways 3.2 Airport4 Adjacent counties 5 Demographics 6 Communities6.1 Cities 6.2 Villages 6.3 Towns 6.4 Census-designated place 6.5 Unincorporated communities 6.6 Ghost towns/neighborhoods7 Politics 8 Tree cities 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory[edit] Rock County was created in 1836 as a territorial county on December 7, 1836 from Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County and fully organized February 19, 1839.[3] The county is named for the Rock River, which bisects the county from north to south.[4] Geography[edit] According to the U.S
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1910 United States Census
The Thirteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 Census
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Metropolitan Statistical Area
PopulationArea Density Ethnic identity Foreign-born Income Spanish speakers By decadeUrban areasPopulous cities and metropolitan areasMetropolitan areas574 Primary Statistical Areas 174 Combined Statistical Areas 929 Core Based Statistical Areas 389 Metropolitan Statistical Areas 541 Micropolitan Statistical AreasMegaregionsSee also North American metro areas World citiesv t eIn the United States, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area. Such regions are neither legally incorporated as a city or town would be, nor are they legal administrative divisions like counties or separate entities such as states; as such, the precise definition of any given metropolitan area can vary with the source
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1900 United States Census
The Twelfth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900,[1] determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit]The 1900 census collected the following information:[2]address name relationship to head of family gender race (listed as "Color or race" on the census) age,
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1890 United States Census
The Eleventh United States Census
United States Census
was taken beginning June 2, 1890. It determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 62,979,766—an increase of 25.5 percent over the 50,189,209 persons enumerated during the 1880 census. The data was tabulated by machine for the first time
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1880 United States Census
The United States Census
United States Census
of 1880 conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880 was the tenth United States
United States

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1870 United States Census
The United States Census
United States Census
of 1870 was the ninth United States Census. Conducted by the Census Bureau
Census Bureau
in June 1870, the 1870 Census
Census
was the first census to provide detailed information on the black population, only years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom. The population was said to be 38,555,983 individuals, a 22.62% increase since 1860
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1860 United States Census
The United States
United States
Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States
United States
starting June 1, 1860, and lasting five months. It determined the population of the United States
United States
to be 31,443,321, an increase of 35.4 percent over the 23,191,875 persons enumerated during the 1850 Census. The total population included 3,953,761 slaves, representing 12.6% of the total population. By the time the 1860 census returns were ready for tabulation, the nation was sinking into the American Civil War. As a result, Census Superintendent Joseph C. G. Kennedy
Joseph C. G. Kennedy
and his staff produced only an abbreviated set of public reports, without graphic or cartographic representations. The statistics did allow the Census staff to produce a cartographic display, including preparing maps of Southern states, for Union field commanders
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1850 United States Census
The United States Census
United States Census
of 1850 was the seventh census of the United States. Conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1850, it determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 23,191,876—an increase of 35.9 percent over the 17,069,453 persons enumerated during the 1840 Census. The total population included 3,204,313 slaves. This was the first census where there was an attempt to collect information about every member of every household, including women, children, and slaves. Prior to 1850, census records had recorded only the name of the head of the household and broad statistical accounting of other household members (three children under age five, one woman between the age of 35 and 40, etc.)
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1840 United States Census
The United States Census
United States Census
of 1840 was the sixth census of the United States. Conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1840, it determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32.7 percent over the 12,866,020 persons enumerated during the 1830 Census. The total population included 2,487,355 slaves. In 1840, the center of population was about 260 miles (418 km) west of Washington, near Weston, Virginia.Contents1 Controversy over statistics for mental illness among Northern blacks 2 Census questions 3 Data availability 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksControversy over statistics for mental illness among Northern blacks[edit] The 1840 Census was the first that attempted to count Americans who were "insane" or "idiotic"
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U.S. Highway 51
U.S. Route 51
U.S. Route 51
is a major south-north United States highway
United States highway
that extends 1,286 miles (2,070 km) from the western suburbs of New Orleans, Louisiana
Louisiana
to within 100 feet (30 m) of the Wisconsin– Michigan
Michigan
border. Much of the highway in Illinois
Illinois
and southern Wisconsin
Wisconsin
runs parallel to or overlaps Interstate 39
Interstate 39
(I-39), and much of the route in several states also parallels the Illinois Central Railroad. The highway's northern terminus is between Hurley, Wisconsin, and Ironwood, Michigan, where it ends with a T interchange at US 2
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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U.S. Highway 12
U.S. Route 12
U.S. Route 12
(US 12) is an east–west United States highway, running from Aberdeen, Washington
Aberdeen, Washington
to Detroit, Michigan, for almost 2,500 miles (4,000 km)
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Interstate 90
Interstate 90
Interstate 90
(I-90) is a transcontinental freeway, and the longest Interstate Highway
Interstate Highway
in the United States
United States
at 3,020.54 miles (4,861.09 km). Its western terminus is in Seattle, at State Route 519 near Safeco Field
Safeco Field
and CenturyLink Field, and its eastern terminus is in Boston, at Route 1A near Logan International Airport. The western portion of I-90 crosses the Continental Divide
Continental Divide
over Homestake Pass just east of Butte, Montana, connecting major cities such as Spokane, Washington, Billings, Montana, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and Madison, Wisconsin. East of the Wisconsin- Illinois
Illinois
border, much of I-90 follows several toll roads, many of which predate the Interstate Highway system
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U.S. Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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U.S. Highway 14
U.S. Route 14
U.S. Route 14
(abbreviated U.S. 14 or US 14), an east–west route, is one of the original United States highways of 1926. It currently has a length of 1,398 miles (2,250 km), but it had a peak length of 1,429 miles (2,300 km). For much of its length, it runs roughly parallel to Interstate 90. As of 2004, the highway's eastern terminus is in Chicago, Illinois. Its western terminus is the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, with the western terminus of U.S. Route 16
U.S. Route 16
and the western terminus of the eastern segment of U.S. Route 20.[1]Contents1 Route description1.1 Wyoming 1.2 South Dakota 1.3 Minnesota 1.4 Wisconsin 1.5 Illinois2 History 3 Major intersections 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksRoute description[edit] Wyoming[edit] Main article: U.S. Route 14
U.S. Route 14
in WyomingU.S
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