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Rock And Roll
Rock and roll
Rock and roll
(often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s,[1][2] from African American musical styles such as gospel, jump blues, jazz, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues,[3] along with country music.[4] While elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records from the 1920s[5] and in country records of the 1930s,[4] the genre did not acquire its name until 1954.[6][7] According to Greg Kot, "rock and roll" refers to a style of popular music originating in the U.S
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Merriam-Webster Dictionary
Merriam–Webster, Incorporated, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries. In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G & C Merriam Co. in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1843, after Noah Webster died, the company bought the rights to An American Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language from Webster's estate. All Merriam–Webster dictionaries trace their lineage to this source. In 1964, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
acquired Merriam–Webster, Inc. as a subsidiary. The company adopted its current name in 1982.[1][2]Contents1 Origins1.1 Noah Webster 1.2 Merriam as publisher2 Services 3 Pronunciation guides 4 Writing entries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigins[edit] Noah Webster[edit] In 1806, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language
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Boswell Sisters
The Boswell Sisters
The Boswell Sisters
were a close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters Martha Boswell Lloyd (June 9, 1905 – July 2, 1958), Connee Boswell (original name Connie, December 3, 1907 – October 11, 1976), and Helvetia "Vet" Boswell
Helvetia "Vet" Boswell
(May 20, 1911 – November 12, 1988), noted for intricate harmonies and rhythmic experimentation. They attained national prominence in the United States in the 1930s.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Hit singles 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] The sisters were raised in a middle-class family at 3937 Camp Street in uptown New Orleans, Louisiana.[1] Martha and Connie were born in Kansas City, Missouri. Helvetia was born in Birmingham, Alabama. (Connee's name was originally spelled Connie until she changed it in the 1940s.) Born to a former vaudevillian, Clyde “A
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Singing
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
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Horn (instrument)
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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Bass (instrument)
Bass (/ˈbeɪs/ BAYSS) describes musical instruments that produce tones in the low-pitched range C4- C2. They belong to different families of instruments and can cover a wide range of musical roles. Since producing low pitches usually requires a long air column or string, the string and wind bass instruments are usually the largest instruments in their families or instrument classes. As seen in the musical instrument classification article, categorizing instruments can be difficult. For example, some instruments fall into more than one category
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Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
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Popular Music
Popular music
Popular music
is music with wide appeal[1][2][3] that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training.[1] It stands in contrast to both art music[4][5][6] and traditional or "folk" music. Art music
Art music
was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings
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American Heritage Dictionary
The American Heritage Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language (AHD) is an American dictionary of English published by Boston publisher Houghton Mifflin, the first edition of which appeared in 1969. Its creation was spurred by the controversy over the Webster's Third New International Dictionary.Contents1 History 2 Linguistics 3 Usage panel 4 Illustrations 5 First edition 6 Second and later editions 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] James Parton, the publisher (and co-owner) of the history magazine American Heritage, was appalled by the permissiveness of Webster's Third, published in 1961, and tried to buy the G. and C. Merriam Company so he could undo the changes. When that failed, he contracted with Houghton to publish a new dictionary
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Snare Drum
A snare drum or side drum is a percussion instrument that produces a sharp staccato sound when the head is struck with a drum stick, due to the use of a series of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin. Snare drums are often used in orchestras, concert bands, marching bands, parades, drumlines, drum corps, and more. It is one of the central pieces in a drum set, a collection of percussion instruments designed to be played by a seated drummer, which is used in many genres of music. Snare drums are usually played with drum sticks, but other beaters such as the brush or the rute can be used to achieve very different sounds. The snare drum is a versatile and expressive percussion instrument due its sensitivity and responsiveness. The sensitivity of the snare drum allows it to respond audibly to the softest strokes, even with a wire brush; as well, it can be used for complex rhythmic patterns and engaging solos at moderate volumes
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Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round
Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round is a 1934 American drama film with musical and comedic elements, directed by Benjamin Stoloff.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] Gangster Lee Lother (Sidney Blackmer) is shot and killed during an ocean liner cruise, and we're introduced in flashback to the interwoven stories and characters of the suspects: con-man and jewel-thief Jimmy Brett and his accomplice, a wife who bids goodbye to her husband without realizing he'll stowaway to spy on her, the star of the ship's entertainment revue and her brother with gambling debts, and the Inspector who interrupts his vacation to solve the case. The film's many musical numbers include a Busby Berkeley-like number with chorus girls in geometric patterns filmed from overhead. A song performed by The Boswell Sisters
The Boswell Sisters
titled "Rock and Roll", written by Richard A. Whiting
Richard A

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Billboard (magazine)
Billboard (styled as billboard) is an American entertainment media brand owned by the Billboard-Hollywood Reporter Media Group, a division of Eldridge Industries. It publishes pieces involving news, video, opinion, reviews, events, and style. It is also known for its music charts, including the Billboard Hot 100
Billboard Hot 100
and Billboard 200, tracking the most popular singles and albums in different genres. It also hosts events, owns a publishing firm, and operates several TV shows. Billboard was founded in 1894 by William Donaldson and James Hennegan as a trade publication for bill posters. Donaldson later acquired Hennegen's interest in 1900 for $500. In the early years of the 20th century, it covered the entertainment industry, such as circuses, fairs, and burlesque shows. It also created a mail service for travelling entertainers. Billboard began focusing more on the music industry as the jukebox, phonograph, and radio became commonplace
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Greg Kot
Greg Kot (born March 3, 1957) is an American writer, author and journalist. Since 1990, Kot has been the music critic at the Chicago Tribune,[1] where he has covered popular music and reported on music-related social, political and business issues. Kot cohosts Sound Opinions which claims in its intro to be "the world's only rock 'n' roll talk show," nationally syndicated through its home base at Chicago Public Radio, WBEZ-FM 91.5.[2] Kot's books include Wilco: Learning How to Die, Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music, and I'll Take You There: Mavis Staples, the Staple Singers and the March up Freedom's Highway.[3] He also co-authored The Beatles vs
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Merchantville, New Jersey
Merchantville is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,821,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 20 (+0.5%) from the 3,801 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 294 (−7.2%) from the 4,095 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] Merchantville was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1874, from portions of Delaware Township (now Cherry Hill Township) and Stockton Township.[20] While one source attributes the borough's name to a family named Merchant,[21] Francis F
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St. Louis
St. Louis
St. Louis
Lambert International Airport MidAmerica St. Louis
St. Louis
AirportWaterways Mississippi RiverWebsite stlouis-mo.gov St. Louis
St. Louis
(/seɪnt ˈluːɪs/)[10][11][12] is an independent city[13] and major U.S. port in the state of Missouri, built along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which marks Missouri's border with Illinois. The city had an estimated March 22, 2018 population of 308,626[8] and is the cultural and economic center of the Greater St. Louis area (home to 2,807,338 people ), making it the largest metropolitan area in Missouri
Missouri
and the 19th-largest in the United States. Prior to European settlement, the area was a major regional center of Native American Mississippian culture. The city of St. Louis
St

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