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Robin Hood
Robin Hood
Robin Hood
is a legendary heroic outlaw originally depicted in English folklore and subsequently featured in literature and film. According to legend, he was a highly skilled archer and swordsman. In some versions of the legend he is depicted as being of noble birth, and having fought in the Crusades
Crusades
before returning to England
England
to find his lands have been taken by the Sheriff. In other versions this is not the case and he is instead born into the yeoman class. Traditionally depicted dressed in Lincoln green, he is said to have robbed from the rich and given to the poor. Through retellings, additions, and variations a body of familiar characters associated with Robin Hood
Robin Hood
have been created. These include his paramour, Maid Marian, his band of outlaws, the Merry Men, and his chief opponent, the Sheriff of Nottingham
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Henry VIII Of England
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages and, in particular, his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England
Church of England
and dissolved convents and monasteries. Despite his resulting excommunication, Henry remained a believer in core Catholic
Catholic
theological teachings.[2] Domestically, Henry is known for his radical changes to the English Constitution, ushering in the theory of the divine right of kings to England
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Artisan
An artisan (from French: artisan, Italian: artigiano) is a skilled craft worker who makes or creates things by hand that may be functional or strictly decorative, for example furniture, decorative arts, sculptures, clothing, jewellery, food items, household items and tools or even mechanisms such as the handmade clockwork movement of a watchmaker. Artisans practice a craft and may through experience and aptitude reach the expressive levels of an artist. The adjective "artisanal" is sometimes used in describing hand-processing in what is usually viewed as an industrial process, such as in the phrase artisanal mining. Thus, "artisanal" is sometimes used in marketing and advertising as a buzz word to describe or imply some relation with the crafting of handmade food products, such as bread, beverages or cheese
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Exeter
Exeter
Exeter
(/ˈɛksɪtər/ ( listen)) is a cathedral city in Devon, England, with a population of 129,800 (mid-2016 est.). The city is on the River Exe
River Exe
about 37 miles (60 km) northeast of Plymouth
Plymouth
and 70 miles (110 km) southwest of Bristol. It is the county town of Devon, and the home of Devon
Devon
County Council. Exeter
Exeter
was the most south-westerly Roman fortified settlement in Britain, although there is evidence a British tribe existed in Exeter before the Roman invasion. Exeter
Exeter
became a religious centre during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and into the Tudor times: Exeter
Exeter
Cathedral, founded in the mid 11th century, became Anglican
Anglican
during the 16th-century English Reformation
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Third Crusade
Treaty
Treaty
of JaffaA truce of three years resulting from Crusader military victories. Recognition of the territorial status quo at the end of active campaigning, including continued Muslim
Muslim
control of
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Knight
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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John Stow
John Stow
John Stow
(also Stowe; 1524/25 – 5 April 1605) was an English historian and antiquarian, best known for his Survey of London (1598; second edition 1603).Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Survey of London3 Later years and death 4 Commemoration 5 References5.1 Edition 5.2 Further reading6 External linksLife[edit] John Stow
John Stow
was born in about 1525 in the City parish of St Michael, Cornhill, then at the heart of London's metropolis. His father, Thomas Stow, was a tallow chandler. Thomas Stow is recorded as paying rent of 6s 8d per year for the family dwelling, and as a youth Stow would fetch milk every morning from a farm on the land nearby to the east owned by the Minoresses of the Convent of St
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Sword
A sword is a bladed weapon intended for slashing or thrusting that is longer than a knife or dagger. The precise definition of the term varies with the historical epoch or the geographical region under consideration. A sword consists of a long blade attached to a hilt. The blade can be straight or curved. Thrusting swords have a pointed tip on the blade, and tend to be straighter; slashing swords have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade, and are more likely to be curved. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze
Bronze
Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard
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Cambridge University
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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Mariology
Mariology
Mariology
is the theological study of Mary, the mother of Jesus. Mariology
Mariology
methodically presents teachings about her to other parts of the faith, such as teachings about Jesus, redemption and grace. Christian Mariology
Mariology
aims to connect scripture, tradition and the teachings of the Church on Mary.[3][4][5] In the context of social history, Mariology
Mariology
may be broadly defined as the study of devotion to and thinking about Mary throughout the history of Christianity.[6] There exist a variety of Christian views on Mary ranging from the focus on Veneration of Mary in Roman Catholicism
Veneration of Mary in Roman Catholicism
in Roman Catholic Mariology
Mariology
to Protestant objections, with Anglican Marian theology
Anglican Marian theology
in between
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Page (occupation)
A page or page boy is traditionally a young male attendant or servant, but may also have been used for a messenger at the service of a nobleman. The origin of the term is uncertain, but it may come either from the Latin pagus (servant), possibly linked to peasant, or an earlier Greek word παῖς (pais = child). During wedding ceremonies, a page boy is often used as a symbolic attendant to carry the rings, a role comparable to the scattering of flower petals by flower girls.Contents1 The medieval page 2 The household page 3 The decorative page 4 Modern pages 5 See also 6 ReferencesThe medieval page[edit]Alof de Wignacourt and a page, by Caravaggio. Louvre, Paris.In medieval times, a page was an attendant to a nobleman, a knight, a Governor or a Castellan.[1] Until the age of about seven, sons of noble families would receive training in manners and basic literacy from their mothers or other female relatives
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Peasant
A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer, especially one living in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
under feudalism and paying rent, tax, fees or services to a landlord.[1][2] In Europe, peasants were divided into three classes according to their personal status: slave, serf, and free tenant. Peasants either hold title to land in fee simple, or hold land by any of several forms of land tenure, among them socage, quit-rent, leasehold, and copyhold.[3] The word "peasant" is—and long has been—often used pejoratively to refer to poor or landless farmers and agricultural workers, especially in the poorer countries of the world in which the agricultural labor force makes up a large percentage of the population
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Plebs
The plebs were, in ancient Rome, the general body of free Roman citizens who were not patricians, as determined by the census. The precise origins of the group and the term are unclear, though it may be that they began as a limited political movement in opposition to the elite (patricians) which became more widely applied.[1]Contents1 In ancient Rome1.1 Noble Plebeians2 Derivatives2.1 United States military academies 2.2 British Empire3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksIn ancient Rome[edit] In Latin the word plebs is a singular collective noun, and its genitive is plebis. The origin of the separation into orders is unclear, and it is disputed when the Romans were divided under the early kings into patricians and plebeians, or whether the clientes (or dependents) of the patricians formed a third group
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Feudalism
Feudalism
Feudalism
was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries
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Elizabethan Era
The Elizabethan era
Elizabethan era
is the epoch in the Tudor period
Tudor period
of the history of England
England
during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603). Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history
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Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish1150 1249 1293Livonian 1198–1290 Prussian 1217–1274 Lithuan
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