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Robin Thicke Performing
Performance
Performance
is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills and abilities.[1]Contents1 Management science 2 Arts 3 Performance
Performance
state3.1 Stage fright4 See also 5 References 6 Additional readingManagement science[edit] In work place, performance or job performance means good ranking with the hypothesized conception of requirements of a role. There are two types of job performances: contextual and task
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Performance (other)
A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which a performer or group of performers behave in a particular way for another group of people. Performance
Performance
may also refer to:Performing arts Performance
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Performance Management
Performance
Performance
management (PM) includes activities which ensure that goals are consistently being met in an effective and efficient manner. Performance
Performance
management can focus on the performance of an organization, a department, employee, or even the processes to build a product or service, as well as many[quantify] other areas.Contents1 Application1.1 Benefits2 Organizational development 3 In companies 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingApplication[edit] This is used most often in the workplace, can apply wherever people interact—schools, churches, community meetings, sports teams, health setting,[1] governmental agencies, social events, and even political settings—anywhere in the world people interact with their environments to produce desired effects
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Circus (performing Art)
A circus is a company of performers who put on diverse entertainment shows that include clowns, acrobats, trained animals, trapeze acts, musicians, dancers, hoopers, tightrope walkers, jugglers, magicians, unicyclists, as well as other object manipulation and stunt-oriented artists. The term 'circus' also describes the performance which has followed various formats through its 250-year modern history. Philip Astley is credited with being the 'father' of the modern circus when he opened the first circus in 1768 in England. A skilled equestrian, Astley demonstrated trick riding, riding in a circle rather than a straight line as his rivals did, and thus chanced on the format which was later named a 'circus'. In 1770 he hired acrobats, tightrope walkers, jugglers and a clown to fill in the pauses between acts. Performances developed significantly through the next fifty years, with large-scale theatrical battle reenactments becoming a significant feature
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Entertainment
Entertainment
Entertainment
is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention.[1] Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens
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Executive Functions
Executive functions
Executive functions
(collectively referred to as executive function and cognitive control) are a set of cognitive processes that are necessary for the cognitive control of behavior: selecting and successfully monitoring behaviors that facilitate the attainment of chosen goals. Executive functions
Executive functions
include basic cognitive processes such as attentional control, cognitive inhibition, inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Operetta
Operetta
Operetta
is a genre of light opera, light in terms both of music and subject matter.Contents1 Definitions1.1 Operettas and operas 1.2 Operettas and musicals2 Operetta
Operetta
in French2.1 Origins 2.2 Offenbach3 Operetta
Operetta
in German3.1 Austria-Hungary 3.2 Germany4 Operetta
Operetta
in English 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinitions[edit]Candide has been performed as a Broadway musical, and as an operetta at New York City Opera
Opera
and elsewhere.Operettas have similarities to both operas and musicals, and the boundaries between the genres are sometimes blurred. For instance, American composer Scott Joplin
Scott Joplin
insisted that his serious but ragtime-influenced work Treemonisha
Treemonisha
(1911) was an opera, but some reference works characterize it as an operetta
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Performativity
Performativity is language which effects change in the world and functions as a form of social action.[1] The concept has multiple applications in diverse fields, such as linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, law, gender studies, performance studies, and economics. Performativity was first defined by philosopher of language John L. Austin as the capacity of speech and communication to act or to consummate an action. Common examples of performative language are making promises, betting, performing a wedding ceremony, an umpire calling a strike, or a judge pronouncing a verdict
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Performance Art
Performance
Performance
art is a performance presented to an audience within a fine art context, traditionally interdisciplinary. Performance
Performance
may be either scripted or unscripted, random or carefully orchestrated; spontaneous or otherwise carefully planned with or without audience participation. The performance can be live or via media; the performer can be present or absent. It can be any situation that involves four basic elements: time, space, the performer's body, or presence in a medium, and a relationship between performer and audience. Performance art can happen anywhere, in any type of venue or setting and for any length of time
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Performance Poetry
Performance poetry
Performance poetry
is poetry that is specifically composed for or during a performance before an audience. During the 1980s, the term[1] came into popular usage to describe poetry written or composed for performance rather than print distribution, mostly open to improvisation.Contents1 History 2 Poetry
Poetry
in oral cultures 3 Advent of printing 4 20th century 5 The 1970s and after 6 The United Kingdom 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The term performance poetry originates from an early press release describing the 1980s performance poet Hedwig Gorski, whose audio recordings achieved success on spoken word radio programs around the world.[2] Her band, East of Eden Band, was described[by whom?] as the most successful at music and poetry collaborations, allowing cassettes of her live radio broadcast recordings to stay in rotation with popular underground music recordings on some radio stations
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Storytelling
Storytelling
Storytelling
describes the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, sometimes with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment. Every culture has its own stories or narratives, which are shared as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation or instilling moral values.[1] Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot, characters and narrative point of view. The term "storytelling" can refer in a narrow sense specifically to oral storytelling and also in a looser sense to techniques used in other media to unfold or disclose the narrati
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Performance Dance
Concert dance
Concert dance
(also known as performance dance or theatre dance in the United Kingdom) is dance performed for an audience
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Performance Science
Performance science is the multidisciplinary study of human performance. It draws together methodologies across numerous scientific disciplines, including those of biomechanics, economics, physiology, psychology, and sociology, to understand the fundamental skills, mechanisms, and outcomes of performance activities and experiences.[1] It carries implications for various domains of skilled human activity, often performed under extreme stress and/or under the scrutiny of audiences or evaluators
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Ballet
Ballet
Ballet
/ˈbæleɪ/ (French: [balɛ]) is a type of performance dance that originated during the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
in the 15th century and later developed into a concert dance form in France and Russia. It has since become a widespread, highly technical form of dance with its own vocabulary based on French terminology. It has been globally influential and has defined the foundational techniques used in many other dance genres and cultures. Ballet
Ballet
has been taught in various schools around the world, which have historically incorporated their own cultures to evolve the art. See glossary of ballet. A ballet, a work, consists of the choreography and music for a ballet production
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Recital
A concert is a live music performance in front of an audience. The performance may be by a single musician, sometimes then called a recital, or by a musical ensemble, such as an orchestra, choir, or band. Concerts are held in a wide variety and size of settings, from private houses and small nightclubs, dedicated concert halls, arenas and parks to large multipurpose buildings, and even sports stadiums. Indoor concerts held in the largest venues are sometimes called arena concerts or amphitheatre concerts. Informal names for a concert include show and gig. Regardless of the venue, musicians usually perform on a stage. Concerts often require live event support with professional audio equipment
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