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Robin Lovell-Badge
Robin Howard Lovell-Badge, CBE, FRS is a British scientist most famous for his discovery, along with Peter Goodfellow, of the SRY gene
SRY gene
on the Y-chromosome that is the determinant of sex in mammals.[1] He is currently a Group Leader and Head of the Division of Stem Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics at the Francis Crick Institute
Francis Crick Institute
in Central London.[2][3] References[edit]^ Koopman, Peter; Gubbay, John; Vivian, Nigel; Goodfellow, Peter; Lovell-Badge, Robin (1991). "Male development of chromosomally female mice transgenic for Sry". Nature. 351: 117–121. doi:10.1038/351117a0.  ^ "Robin Lovell-Badge: Biography". The Francis Crick Institute.  ^ "Dr Robin Lovell-Badge FMedSci FRS". London: Royal Society
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Peter Goodfellow
Peter Neville Goodfellow, FRS FMedSci (born 4 August 1951) is a British geneticist best known for his work on sex determination and the SRY gene that encodes testis determining factor
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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Creative Commons License
A Creative Commons
Creative Commons
(CC) license is one of several public copyright licenses that enable the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted work. A CC license is used when an author wants to give people the right to share, use, and build upon a work that they have created. CC provides an author flexibility (for example, they might choose to allow only non-commercial uses of their own work) and protects the people who use or redistribute an author's work from concerns of copyright infringement as long as they abide by the conditions that are specified in the license by which the author distributes the work.[1][2][3][4][5] There are several types of CC licenses. The licenses differ by several combinations that condition the terms of distribution. They were initially released on December 16, 2002 by Creative Commons, a U.S. non-profit corporation founded in 2001
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to
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SRY Gene
1HRY, 1HRZ, 1J46, 1J47, 2GZKIdentifiersAliases SRY, SRXX1, SRXY1, TDF, TDY, Testis determining factor, sex determining region Y, Sex-determining region of Y-chromosome, Sex-determining region YExternal IDs OMIM: 480000 HomoloGene: 48168 GeneCards: SRYGene location (Human)Chr. Y chromosome (human)[1]Band Yp11.2 Start 2,786,855 bp[1]End 2,787,699 bp[1]RNA expression patternMore reference expression dataGene ontologyMolecular function • transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding • transcription factor binding • calmodulin binding • transcription factor activity, RNA polymerase II distal enhancer sequence-specific binding • DNA binding • protein binding • RNA polymerase II transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA bindingCellular component • cytoplasm • nuclear speck • nucleoplasm • cell nucleusBiological process • cell differentiation • regulati
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Sheila Sherlock
Professor Dame
Dame
Sheila Patricia Violet Sherlock FRCP, FRCP Ed, FRS[1] (31 March 1918 – 30 December 2001) was a British physician and teacher who is considered the major pioneer in the field of hepatology, the study of the liver.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Publications 4 Affiliations 5 Honours and awards 6 Personal life 7 Legacy 8 Quotes 9 References 10 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Sheila Sherlock was born in Dublin
Dublin
on 31 March 1918, the only daughter of Violet Mary Catherine (née Beckett) and Samuel Philip Sherlock, an army officer then serving as a lieutenant in the 1st cavalry reserve. Her family moved from Ireland
Ireland
to London
London
soon after her birth and she attended private schools in the city until her family moved in 1929 to the village of Sandgate, Kent.[2] In Kent, she was educated at the Folkestone County School for Girls
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Paul Madden
Paul Anthony Madden, FRS, FRSE is a British chemist and Provost of The Queen's College, Oxford. From 1984 until 2005 he was Fellow in Chemistry at The Queen's College, Oxford and also Senior Tutor of the college and Chairman of the University Information Technology Committee
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Mike Paterson
Michael Stewart "Mike" Paterson, is a British computer scientist, who was the director of the Centre for Discrete Mathematics and its Applications at the University of Warwick
University of Warwick
until 2007, and chair of the Department of Computer Science
Computer Science
in 2005. He received his doctorate from Cambridge University in 1967, under the supervision of David Park.[1] He spent three years at MIT
MIT
and moved to University of Warwick
University of Warwick
in 1971.[2] Paterson is an expert on theoretical computer science with more than 100 publications, especially the design and analysis of algorithms and computational complexity. Paterson's distinguished career was recognised with the EATCS Award
EATCS Award
in 2006 and a workshop in honour of his 66th birthday in 2008, including contributions of several Turing Award and Gödel Prize laureates
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Bruce Ponder
Sir Bruce Anthony John Ponder FMedSci FRS (born 25 April 1944) is an English geneticist and cancer researcher. He is Emeritus Professor of Oncology
Oncology
at the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
and former director of the Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK
Cambridge Institute.Contents1 Education 2 Research 3 Career 4 Awards and honours 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Ponder was educated at Charterhouse School
Charterhouse School
and Jesus College, Cambridge.[1] He carried out his PhD studies with Lionel Crawford in London working on chromatin organisation and DNA sequence specificity using polyoma virus.[4] Research[edit] Ponder became interested in cancer genetics in the 1970s, when he saw the potential to use new methods of linkage analysis (using restriction fragment length polymorphisms) to identify genes that predispose to cancer
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Geoffrey Raisman
Professor Geoffrey (Geoff) Raisman FRS (28 June 1939 – 27 January 2017) was a British neuroscientist.[1]Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 External links 4 ReferencesPersonal life[edit] He was born in Leeds
Leeds
and died in London. His parents were Harry and Celia Raisman, both also born in Leeds. Geoffrey's grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Lithuania
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Allan Sandage
Allan Rex Sandage (June 18, 1926 – November 13, 2010) was an American astronomer. He was Staff Member Emeritus with the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California.[2] He determined the first reasonably accurate values for the Hubble constant
Hubble constant
and the age of the universe. He also discovered the first quasar.[3][4]Asteroids discovered: 1(96155) 1973 HA 27 April 1973Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Honors 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksCareer[edit] Sandage was one of the most influential astronomers of the 20th century.[5] He was born in Iowa City, Iowa, United States. He graduated from the University of Illinois
University of Illinois
in 1948
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Dale Sanders
Professor Dale Sanders, FRS (born 13 May 1953) is a director of the John Innes Centre,[2] an internationally leading institute for research in plant sciences and microbiology in Norwich, England.Contents1 Education 2 Research 3 Career 4 Awards and honours 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Sanders was educated at The Hemel Hempstead School
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David Schindler
David William Schindler, OC AOE FRSC FRS, (born August 3, 1940) is an American/Canadian limnologist. He holds the Killam Memorial Chair and is Professor of Ecology
Ecology
in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta
Alberta
in Edmonton, Alberta.[1][2] He is notable for "innovative large-scale experiments" on whole lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area
Experimental Lakes Area
(ELA)[3] which proved that "phosphorus controls the eutrophication (excessive algal blooms) in temperate lakes [4] leading to the banning of phosphates in detergents. He is also known for his research on acid rain[4][5] In 1989, Dr
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