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Robert Stockman
Robert Stockman (born October 6, 1953) is a scholar specializing in Bahá'í studies who has been called "the foremost historian of the Bahá’í Faith in America."[1] He received his undergraduate degree from Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
(B.A., 1975) and a doctorate in religious studies from Harvard University
Harvard University
(Th.D., 1990).[2]Contents1 Background 2 Career 3 Articles 4 Books 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Robert Stockman was raised in Granby, Connecticut
Granby, Connecticut
by Harold Herman and Margery (Fothergill) Stockman, who worked as apple farmers. He initially majored in geology at Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
and later received a master's degree in planetary science from Brown University, with a particular interest in the geology of Mars
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Wilmette, Illinois
Wilmette is a village in New Trier
Trier
Township, Cook County, Illinois, United States. It is located 14 miles (23 km) north of Chicago's downtown district (4 mi or 6 km from Chicago's northern border) and had a population at the 2010 census of 27,087.[4] Wilmette is considered a bedroom community in the North Shore region. In 2007, Wilmette was ranked as the seventh best place to raise children in the U.S., according to Business Week.[5] In 2015, Wilmette was ranked the best place to live in Illinois
Illinois
based on a variety of factors including its low unemployment rate, median income, low housing vacancy rate, high education expenditures per student, low crime, and short commute times.[6] Wilmette is home to 2 of Illinois' 17 elementary schools (Romona Elementary, St
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Juan Cole
John Ricardo I. "Juan" Cole (born October 23, 1952) is an American academic and commentator on the modern Middle East and South Asia.[1][2] He is Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan
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American Academy Of Religion
The American Academy of Religion (AAR) is the world's largest association of scholars in the field of religious studies and related topics. It is a nonprofit member association, serving as a professional and learned society for scholars involved in the academic study of religion. It has some 10,000 members worldwide, with the largest concentration being in the United States and Canada. AAR members are university and college professors, independent scholars, secondary teachers, clergy, seminarians, students, and interested lay-people.Contents1 History 2 Publications 3 Annual meeting 4 Other activities 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] AAR was founded in 1909 as the Association of Biblical Instructors in American Colleges and Secondary Schools.[1] The name was changed to National Association of Biblical Instructors (NABI) in 1933
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Indiana University South Bend
Indiana
Indiana
University South Bend (IU South Bend) is the third largest campus of the Indiana
Indiana
University system. It is popularly known as "IUSB" and is located in South Bend, Indiana, in St. Joseph County.Contents1 History 2 Campus 3 Buildings 4 Academics 5 Library 6 Student body 7 Student life 8 Housing 9 Athletics 10 Faculty10.1 Notable faculty11 Notable alumni 12 References 13 External linksHistory[edit] Indiana
Indiana
University began offering classes in South Bend in 1922 as an extension of the main campus of Indiana
Indiana
University Bloomington.[1] In the Great Depression, the superintendent of South Bend schools asked that more classes be added for those who could not afford to attend classes at the Bloomington campus. The classes were offered at Central High School in downtown South Bend and within a few years enrollment reached 500
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DePaul University
DePaul University
University
is a private university in Chicago, Illinois. Founded by the Vincentians in 1898, the university takes its name from the 17th-century French priest Saint Vincent de Paul. In 1998, it became the largest Catholic university
Catholic university
by enrollment in the United States. Following in the footsteps of its founders, DePaul places special emphasis on recruiting first-generation students and others from disadvantaged backgrounds.[4][5] DePaul's two main campuses are located in Lincoln Park and the Loop. The Lincoln Park Campus is home to the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, Science and Health, and Education. It also houses the School of Music, the Theatre School, and the John T. Richardson Library
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Harvard Divinity School
Harvard Divinity School
Harvard Divinity School
is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. As of June 2015[update], the school's mission is to train and educate its students either in the academic study of religion, or for the practice of a religious ministry or other public service vocation. It also caters to students from other Harvard schools that are interested in the former field
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Bahá'í Faith In North America
The Bahá'í Faith is a diverse and widespread religion founded by Bahá'u'lláh in the 19th century in Iran
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Amazon Standard Identification Number
The Amazon Standard Identification Number (ASIN) is a 10-character alphanumeric unique identifier assigned by Amazon.com
Amazon.com
and its partners for product identification within the Amazon organization.[1] Usage and structure[edit] Although ASINs used to be unique worldwide, global expansion has changed things so that ASINs are only guaranteed unique within a marketplace.[citation needed] The same product may be referred to by several ASINs though, and different national sites may use a different ASIN for the same product.[citation needed] In general, ASINs are likely to be different between the country sites unless they are for a class of product where the ASIN is based on an externally defined and internationally consistent identifier, such as ISBN
ISBN
for books.[citation needed] Each product sold on Amazon.com
Amazon.com
is given a unique ASIN
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Mars
Mars
Mars
is the fourth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System
Solar System
after Mercury. In English, Mars
Mars
carries a name of the Roman god of war, and is often referred to as the "Red Planet"[14][15] because the reddish iron oxide prevalent on its surface gives it a reddish appearance that is distinctive among the astronomical bodies visible to the naked eye.[16] Mars
Mars
is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere, having surface features reminiscent both of the impact craters of the Moon
Moon
and the valleys, deserts, and polar ice caps of Earth. The rotational period and seasonal cycles of Mars
Mars
are likewise similar to those of Earth, as is the tilt that produces the seasons
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Brown University
Brown University
Brown University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, it is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[7] At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the U.S. to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation.[8] Its engineering program, the first in the Ivy League, was established in 1847. It was one of the early doctoral-granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding masters and doctoral studies in 1887.[9] Its New Curriculum is sometimes referred to in education theory as the Brown Curriculum and was adopted by faculty vote in 1969 after a period of student lobbying
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Granby, Connecticut
Granby is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 11,282 at the 2010 census.[1] The town center is defined as a census-designated place known as Salmon Brook. Other areas in town include North Granby and West Granby. Granby is a rural town, located in the foothills of the Litchfield Hills
Litchfield Hills
of the Berkshires, besides the suburban natured center, the outskirts of town are filled with dense woods and rolling hills and mountains. From the 1890s to the 1920s a large number of immigrants from Sweden
Sweden
came to reside in the town.Contents1 History1.1 Daniel Hayes 1.2 First coins in the American colonies 1.3 Modern history2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Education 5 National Register of Historic Places 6 Notable residents 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Granby was founded by people who lived in Simsbury and settled as early as 1723
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
(/ˈwɛsliən/ WESS-lee-ən) is a private liberal arts college in Middletown, Connecticut, founded in 1831. Wesleyan is a Baccalaureate College that emphasizes undergraduate instruction in the arts and sciences, grants research master's degrees in many academic disciplines, and grants PhD degrees in biology, chemistry, mathematics and computer science, molecular biology and biochemistry, music, and physics.[5] Founded under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church
and with the support of prominent residents of Middletown, the now secular university was the first institution of higher education to be named after John Wesley, the founder of Methodism
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