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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge (legally, The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge) is a collegiate research university in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Founded in 1209[9] and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[10] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople.[11] The two English ancient universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as Oxbridge. Cambridge is formed from a variety of institutions which include 31 semi-autonomous constituent colleges and over 150 academic departments, faculties and other institutions organised into six schools
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Culross

Culross (/ˈkurəs/) (Scottish Gaelic: Cuileann Ros, 'holly point or promontory')[2] is a village and former royal burgh, and parish, in Fife, Scotland. According to the 2006 estimate, the village has a population of 395.[1] Originally, Culross served as a port city on the Firth of Forth and is believed to have been founded by Saint Serf during the 6th century. The civil parish had a population of 4,348 in 2011.[3]

A legend states that when the British princess (and future saint) Teneu, daughter of the king of Lothian, became pregnant before marriage, her family threw her from a cliff. She survived the fall unharmed, and was soon met by an unmanned boat
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Culzean Castle
Culzean Castle (/kʌˈln/ kul-AYN, see yogh; Scots: Cullain[1]) is a castle overlooking the Firth of Clyde, near Maybole, Carrick, on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland. It is the former home of the Marquess of Ailsa, the chief of Clan Kennedy, but is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland. The clifftop castle lies within the Culzean Castle Country Park and is opened to the public
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Old Aberdeen

Old Aberdeen is part of the city of Aberdeen in Scotland. Old Aberdeen was originally a separate burgh, which was erected into a burgh of barony on 26 December 1489. It was incorporated into adjacent Aberdeen by Act of Parliament in 1891. It retains the status of a community council area.[1] The town's motto is "concordia res parvae crescunt" ("through harmony, small things increase").

College Bounds, Old Aberdeen
King's College, High Street, Old Aberdeen
Powis Gates
To the north of Aberdeen city centre, Old Aberdeen was for a long time fairly isolated at the edge of the city, being followed to the north by the River Don, Seaton Park and the small Brig o' Balgownie hamlet
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Hamilton House, East Lothian
Hamilton House, also known as Magdalen's House, is a 17th Century "Laird's House" in the town of Prestonpans in East Lothian, Scotland. It is an exemplar of this type of architecture and has retained its crow-stepped gables and corner towers. It is owned by the National Trust for Scotland and is a Category A Listed Building. The house was built in 1626[1] as a replacement for Preston Tower[2] for Sir John Hamilton, Lord Magdalens, who was a Senator of the College of Justice and the brother of the 1st Earl of Haddington. The property was vacated by the Hamiltons in the 1740s, and in the 19th century it was converted into a barracks and later used as a tavern. Around 1880 the Hislop family are recorded as being the owners of the building
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