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Robert Walpole
Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), known before 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain. Although the exact dates of his dominance, the "Robinocracy",[2] are a matter of scholarly debate, the period of 1721–1742 is often used. He dominated the Walpole–Townshend ministry
Walpole–Townshend ministry
and the subsequent Walpole ministry, and holds the record as the longest-serving British prime minister in history
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Pocket Borough
A rotten or pocket borough, more formally known as a nomination borough or proprietorial borough, was a parliamentary borough or constituency in England, Great Britain, or the United Kingdom before the Reform Act 1832, which had a very small electorate and could be used by a patron to gain unrepresentative influence within the unreformed House of Commons. The same terms were used for similar boroughs represented in the 18th-century Parliament of Ireland. Old Sarum
Old Sarum
in Wiltshire
Wiltshire
(pictured) was the most notorious pocket borough. It was a possession of the Pitt family from the mid-17th century until 1802, and one of its Members of Parliament was Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder
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Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revolution 11 December 1688 
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Glorious Revolution
The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England
James II of England
(James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England
William III of England
jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after the Declaration of Right, leading to the Bill of Rights 1689. King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism
Catholicism
and his close ties with France
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De Facto
In law and government, de facto (/deɪ ˈfæktoʊ/ or /di ˈfæktoʊ/[1]; Latin: de facto, "in fact"; Latin pronunciation: [deː ˈfaktoː]), describes practices that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised by official laws.[2][3][4] It is commonly used to refer to what happens in practice, in contrast with de jure ("in law"), which refers to things that happen according to law
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Scholar
The scholarly method or scholarship is the body of principles and practices used by scholars to make their claims about the world as valid and trustworthy as possible, and to make them known to the scholarly public. It is the methods that systemically advance the teaching, research, and practice of a given scholarly or academic field of study through rigorous inquiry. Scholarship is noted by its significance to its particular profession, and is creative, can be documented, can be replicated or elaborated, and can be and is peer-reviewed through various methods.[1]Contents1 Methods 2 Ethical issues 3 See also 4 ReferencesMethods[edit] Originally started to reconcile the philosophy of the ancient classical philosophers with medieval theology, scholasticism is not a philosophy or theology in itself but a tool and method for learning which places emphasis on dialectical reasoning
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Politician
A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. In democratic countries, politicians seek elective positions within a government through elections or, at times, temporary appointment to replace politicians who have died, resigned or have been otherwise removed from office. In non-democratic countries, they employ other means of reaching power through appointment, bribery, revolutions and intrigues. Some politicians are experienced in the art or science of government.[1] Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Great Massingham
Great Massingham is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It has a primary school (including a pre-school in the grounds), a village shop, a pub (Dabbling Duck), a village hall and a church (St. Mary's). It is also notable for the number of ponds in the village - two large ones in the village centre and more in the outskirts. The number of ducks has led for the logo of the school to be one. Great Massingham is also home to a radio transmitting station, broadcasting Radio Norfolk on 104.4 FM and KLFM on 96.7 The site also radiates digital (DAB) radio services. See also[edit]RAF Great Massingham Little MassinghamNotes[edit]^ "Parish population 2011"
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Rougham, Suffolk
Rushbrooke with Rougham is a large civil parish in the St Edmundsbury district of Suffolk in eastern England covering the villages of Blackthorpe, Rougham and Rushbrooke as well as Rougham Airfield. Located directly south-east of Bury St Edmunds, in 2005 its population was 1,140.[1] One 'Henry of Rushbrook' was Abbot of Bury St Edmunds from 1235 to 1248. The site of a former stately home, Rushbrooke Hall, is situated to the south of Rushbrooke. References[edit]^ a b Estimates of Total Population of Areas in Suffolk Suffolk County Council ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 27 August 2016. External links[edit] Media related to Rushbrooke with Rougham at Wikimedia CommonsThis Suffolk location article is a stub
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Middlesex
Middlesex (/ˈmɪdəlsɛks/, abbreviation: Middx) is a historic county in south-east England. It is now entirely within the wider urbanised area of London. Its area is now also mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London, with small sections in other neighbouring ceremonial counties. It was established in the Anglo-Saxon system from the territory of the Middle Saxons, and existed as an official unit until 1965. The historic county includes land stretching north of the River Thames from 3 miles (5 km) east to 17 miles (27 km) west of the City of London with the rivers Colne and Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries. The largely low-lying county, dominated by clay in its north and alluvium on gravel in its south, was the second smallest county by area in 1831.[3] The City of London was a county in its own right from the 12th century and was able to exert political control over Middlesex
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St James's
St James's
St James's
is a central district in the City of Westminster, London, forming part of the West End. In the 17th century the area developed as a residential location for the British aristocracy and around the 19th century was the focus of the development of gentlemen's clubs. Anciently part of the parish of St Martin in the Fields, much of it formed the parish of St James from 1685 to 1922. Since the Second World War the area has transitioned from residential to commercial use.Contents1 History1.1 Toponymy2 Urban development 3 Local government 4 Governance 5 Geography 6 Street name etymologies 7 Economy 8 Culture8.1 Clubland9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory[edit] Toponymy[edit] The St James name is derived from the dedication of a 12th-century leper hospital to Saint James the Less
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House Of Commons Of England
The House of Commons of England
England
was the lower house of the Parliament of England
England
(which incorporated Wales) from its development in the 14th century to the union of England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.Contents1 Origins 2 Development of independence 3 See also 4 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The Parliament of England
Parliament of England
developed from the Magnum Concilium that advised the English monarch in medieval times
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Share (finance)
Share may refer to:To share a resource (such as food or money) is to make joint use of it; see Sharing Share, Kwara, a town and LGA in Kwara State, Nigeria Share (finance), a stock or other security such as a mutual fund Share (newspaper), a newspaper in Toronto, Canada Share (film), a 2015 short drama film Southern Hemisphere Auroral Radar Experiment, tracking space weather from Antarctica Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, a health and soc
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Privy Council Of The United Kingdom
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The Privy Council formally advises the sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and corporately (as Queen-in-Council) it issues executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other powers enact Acts of Parliament. The Council also holds the delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, mostly used to regulate certain public institutions
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