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Robert Peel
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, FRS (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850), was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
(1834–35 and 1841–46) and twice as Home Secretary
Home Secretary
(1822–27 and 1828–30). He is regarded as the father of modern British policing and as one of the founders of the modern Conservative Party. The son of wealthy textile-manufacturer and politician Sir Robert Peel, 1st Baronet, making Robert the first future prime minister from an industrial business background, he was educated at Bury
Bury
Grammar School, Hipperholme Grammar School
Hipperholme Grammar School
and Harrow School, subsequently earning a double first in classics and mathematics from Christ Church, Oxford
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Chief Secretary For Ireland
The Chief Secretary for Ireland
Chief Secretary for Ireland
was a key political office in the British administration in Ireland. Nominally subordinate to the Lord Lieutenant, and officially the "Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant",[1] from the early 19th century until the end of British rule he was effectively the government minister with responsibility for governing Ireland; usually it was the Chief Secretary, rather than the Lord Lieutenant, who sat in the British Cabinet.[2] The Chief Secretary was ex officio President of the Local Government Board for Ireland from its creation in 1872.[3] British rule over much of Ireland came to an end as the result of the Irish War of Independence, which culminated in the establishment of the Irish Free State. In consequence the office of Chief Secretary was abolished, as well as that of Lord Lieutenant
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Middlesex
Middlesex (/ˈmɪdəlsɛks/, abbreviation: Middx) is a historic county in south-east England. It is now entirely within the wider urbanised area of London. Its area is now also mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London, with small sections in other neighbouring ceremonial counties. It was established in the Anglo-Saxon system from the territory of the Middle Saxons, and existed as an official unit until 1965. The historic county includes land stretching north of the River Thames from 3 miles (5 km) east to 17 miles (27 km) west of the City of London with the rivers Colne and Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries. The largely low-lying county, dominated by clay in its north and alluvium on gravel in its south, was the second smallest county by area in 1831.[3] The City of London was a county in its own right from the 12th century and was able to exert political control over Middlesex
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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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William Scott, 1st Baron Stowell
William Scott, 1st Baron Stowell
Baron Stowell
(17 October 1745 – 28 January 1836) was an English judge and jurist.Contents1 Background and education 2 Legal, political and judicial career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground and education[edit] Scott was born at Heworth, a village about four miles from Newcastle upon Tyne, the son of a tradesman engaged in the transport of coal. His younger brother John Scott became Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
and was made Earl of Eldon. He was educated at Newcastle Royal Grammar School and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he gained a Durham scholarship in 1761. In 1764 he graduated and became first a probationary fellow and then as successor to William (afterwards the well known Sir William) Jones a tutor of University College. As Camden reader of ancient history he rivalled the reputation of Blackstone
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Lieutenant (British Army And Royal Marines)
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
(Lt) (/lɛfˈtɛnənt/) is a junior officer rank in the British Army
British Army
and Royal Marines. It ranks above second lieutenant and below captain and has a NATO
NATO
ranking code of OF-1 and it is the senior subaltern rank. Unlike some armed forces which use first lieutenant, the British rank is simply lieutenant, with no ordinal attached. The rank is equivalent to that of a flying officer in the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although formerly considered senior to a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
(RN) sub-lieutenant, the British Army
British Army
and Royal Navy
Royal Navy
ranks of lieutenant and sub-lieutenant are now considered to be of equivalent status. The Army rank of lieutenant has always been junior to the Navy's rank of lieutenant. In the 21st-century British Army, the rank is ordinarily held for up to three years
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Westminster
Westminster
Westminster
(/ˈwɛsmɪnstər, ˈwɛst-/) is an area of central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames.[1] Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey
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Tory
A Tory
Tory
(/tɔːri/) holds a political philosophy (Toryism) based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. The Tory
Tory
ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. In Britain, the Tory
Tory
political faction originated with the Cavaliers
Cavaliers
during the English Civil War. It also had exponents in other parts of the former British Empire, such as the Loyalists of British America
British America
who opposed American secession during the American War of Independence
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Henry William Pickersgill
Henry William Pickersgill
Henry William Pickersgill
RA (3 December 1782 – 21 April 1875) was an English painter specialising in portraits. He was a Royal Academician for almost fifty years, and painted many of the most notable figures of his time.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in London, Pickersgill was adopted in his youth by a Mr Hall, a silk manufacturer in Spitalfields,[1] who financed his schooling and then took him into the family business
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Member Of The British House Of Commons
The commons is the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth. These resources are held in common, not owned privately. Commons
Commons
can also be understood as natural resources that groups of people (communities, user groups) manage for individual and collective benefit
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Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowled
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Baronet
A baronet (/ˈbærənɪt/ or /ˈbærəˌnɛt/;[1] abbreviated Bart or Bt[1]) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (/ˈbærənɪtɪs/,[2] /ˈbærənɪtɛs/,[3] or /ˌbærəˈnɛtɛs/;[4] abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 14th century and was used by James I of England
James I of England
in 1611 as a means of raising funds. A baronetcy is the only British hereditary honour that is not a peerage, with the exception of the Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
Black Knight, White Knight
Knight
and Green Knight
Knight
(of which only the Green Knight
Knight
is extant)
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British Parliament
HM Government     Conservative Party (245)Confidence and supply     Democratic Unionist
Democratic Unionist
Party (3)HM Most Loyal Opposition     Labour Party (191)Other opposition     Liberal Democrats (98)      Non-affiliated (29)      UKIP (3)      Ind. Labour (3)      Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2)      Green Party (1)      Ind. Social Democrat (1)      Ind
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Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg
Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg
Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg
PC FRS (26 October 1778 – 23 April 1866) was a Scottish politician and colonial administrator.Contents1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Personal life 4 Notes 5 External linksBackground and education[edit] Grant was born in Kidderpore, Bengal, India, the eldest son of Charles Grant, chairman of the directors of the British East India
India
Company. His brother, Sir Robert Grant, was also an MP as well as Governor of Bombay. He was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and became a fellow in 1802.[1] He was called to the bar in 1807. Political career[edit] In 1811 Grant was elected to the British House of Commons
British House of Commons
as Member of Parliament for Inverness Burghs. He held that seat until 1818, when was returned for Inverness-shire
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Cashel (UK Parliament Constituency)
Cashel is a former British Parliament constituency in Ireland, returning one MP. It was an original constituency represented in Parliament when the Union of Great Britain and Ireland
Ireland
took effect on 1 January 1801. There were problems with the 21 November 1868 election in the Borough. A petition was presented by the losing candidate, alleging corruption. As a result, the election was declared void. Parliament then passed the Sligo and Cashel Disenfranchisement Act 1870 (33 & 34 Vict. c.38). On 1 August 1870 Cashel lost the right to elect its own MP. The area was transferred to form part of the Tipperary (UK Parliament constituency).Contents1 History 2 Boundaries 3 Members of Parliament 4 Elections4.1 Elections in the 1860s5 External links 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The corporation of the city of Cashel existed, as the local government of its area, until it was abolished by the Municipal Corporations (Ireland) Act 1840
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